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Developmental Psychology - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Developmental Psychology. Paul Moye. 2 year old Timmy curls his toes when his mother rubs the outside bottom part of his foot. Timmy is demonstrating this major infant reflex. Babinski Reflex Other Reflexes: Rooting(mouth) Sucking Morro(falling) Grasping.

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slide2
2 year old Timmy curls his toes when his mother rubs the outside bottom part of his foot. Timmy is demonstrating this major infant reflex
slide3
Babinski Reflex
  • Other Reflexes:
    • Rooting(mouth)
    • Sucking
    • Morro(falling)
    • Grasping
slide4
This major issue of developmental psychology reflects the question:

“Do our early personality traits persist through life or do we become different persons as we age?”

slide5
Stability vs. change
  • Other issues:
    • Nature vs. nurture
    • Continuity vs. stages
slide6
This developmental process is reflected by the fact that we crawl before we walk and we use nouns before adjectives, all as a part of our increasing neural connections.
slide7
Maturation
    • Biological growth processes that enable orderly changes in behavior, relatively uninfluenced by experience.
slide8
This person’s research with rhesus monkeys showed that a monkey’s motivation for attachment is in the comfort of body contact, not nourishment
slide9
Harry Harlow, 1950’s
  • Related terms:
    • Secure base
    • Safe haven
slide10
The first moving object a duckling sees during the hours shortly after hatching is normally its mother. This window of time in which the duckling must see the mother to follow it for proper development is a ______ ______. This rigid attachment process found in animals alone is known as _______.
slide12
An infant is shown a picture of a dog several different times and each time the child becomes less interested in the picture. This child is demonstrating ….
slide13
Habituation: decreasing responsiveness with repeated stimulation.
    • Important for testing infant cognition with schemas
slide14
Tina cannot remember her little sister’s birth from when she was a year old. Her brain had not made a majority of her neural connections (maturation). Tina demonstrates _______ ______.
slide16
A baby is confused when a person playing peek-a-boo covers his face. According to Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development, the baby, who thinks the person has disappeared, has not yet established this aspect of sensorimotor development…
slide18
A child in the concrete operational stage of Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development would know demonstrate awareness of this idea by stating that a tall skinny glass that has a higher level of water has the same amount of water when poured into a short wide glass with a lower level of water.
slide22
The same child sees many other cats and notices that they purr instead of barking. This child realizes that this animal is in fact not a dog but a different type of animal. The child is demonstrating …
slide24
A child demonstrates this preoperational characteristic through a conversation such as this:
  • “Do you have a brother?”
  • “Yes”
  • “What’s his name?”
  • “Jim”
  • Does Jim have a brother?”
  • “No”
bowlby s attachment styles
Bowlby’s attachment styles
  • A _______ attached child is trusting as a child and trusting as an adult.
slide28
A _______ attached child is severely stressed when the parent leaves the room and fears abandonment as an adult.
slide29
Anxious/ambivalent
  • Other attachment styles:
    • Avoidant
    • disorganized
slide30
This was the name of Mary Ainsworth’s experiment that tested attachment styles by having a parent in a child in a room together and then having the parent leave the room. Then stranger would enter the room.
slide32
A parenting style where the parents try to act as friends to their child and allow them to do whatever they please
slide34
A parenting style where the parents demand the children to do hours of chores with no time to play with no room for discussion, negotiation, or explanation
slide36
A parenting style where the parents talk with the kids to come up with a reasonable set of chores for the children to do. These parents would set an appropriate time for curfew, and then explain to their children why this time is reasonable.
slide38
Chelsea is involved in an ongoing research study that takes data on the long term effects of weekly consumption of energy drinks. Taking data on the same people over time is known as….
slide40
This research design studies the effects of weekly consumption of AMP on boys and girls. It takes data at one point in time and is known as …
slide41
Cross sectional research
  • Sequential research is a combination of longitudinal and cross sectional
slide42
These are the eight stages of whose theory?
    • Trust vs. mistrust
    • Autonomy vs. shame
    • Initiative vs. guilt
    • Industry vs. inferiority
    • Identity vs. confusion
    • Intimacy vs. isolation
    • Generativity vs. stagnation
    • Integrity vs. despair
slide45
Freud’s psychosexual development theory
    • Oral
    • Anal
    • Phallic
    • Latency
    • genital
slide46
In this stage of Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, I would explain that cheating is bad because I will get punished…
slide48
In this stage of Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, I would explain that cheating is bad because it violates the natural laws of honesty….
slide50
In this stage of Kohlberg’s theory of moral development, I would explain that cheating is bad because I will feel guilty …