Cancer cases and deaths across the world and in the UK : August 2010
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Cancer cases and deaths across the world and in the UK : August 2010. How many people are diagnosed with cancer worldwide?

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Cancer cases and deaths across the world and in the uk august 2010

Cancer cases and deaths across the world and in the UK : August 2010

How many people are diagnosed with cancer worldwide?

An estimated 12.7 million people were diagnosed with cancer worldwide in 2008. Because of the size of the populations, more than half of these people live in the developing countries, and just over 2% live in the UK.

Incidence across regions

There are big variations in cancer incidence across the world, with almost a three-fold difference in rates between regions. The highest incidence rates are seen in the more developed regions of the world, such as Australia/New Zealand and the lowest rates in the less developed regions, such as Africa and Central America. Despite the lower rates, the size of the populations means that the less developed regions carry a substantial burden of cancer, with over half (56%) of the world’s cancer cases being diagnosed there.

The UK incidence rate is slightly higher than the average in the more developed regions of the world, and more than 75% higher than the average in the less developed regions.

Incidence in males

An estimated 6.6 million men were diagnosed with cancer worldwide in 2008. Lung cancer is the most common, accounting for 16% of all cases diagnosed. Incidence reflects past smoking prevalence, and the number of men being diagnosed with lung cancer worldwide has more than doubled since the mid-1970s.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed in men worldwide (14%). Incidence is high among black populations, and has increased substantially in many developed countries which offer testing for Prostate Specific Antigen.

In the UK, prostate cancer accounts for almost a quarter (24%) of the cancer burden in men. Lung cancer is currently the second most common cancer (15%), though it may be overtaken by colorectal cancer (14%) soon, as male lung cancer incidence continues to fall. Stomach (3%) and liver (1%) cancers are relatively less common in UK men compared to many other parts of the world.

Incidence in females

An estimated 6 million women were diagnosed with cancer worldwide in 2008. Breast cancer is by far the most common, accounting for almost one in four (23%) cases diagnosed. The incidence of breast cancer is increasing in most countries, and the number of women being diagnosed worldwide has more than doubled since the mid-1970s.

Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in women worldwide (9%). There are big variations in incidence across the world, which may relate to population prevalence of Human papillomavirus. Incidence and mortality has declined substantially in nations with screening programmes.

In the UK, breast cancer accounts for almost a third (31%) of the cancer burden in women. Cervical (2%), stomach (2%) and liver (1%) cancers are relatively less common in UK women compared to many countries worldwide.

Estimated worldwide cancer incidence 2008

(with comparison to actual UK 2007 data)

The ten most commonly diagnosed cancers in males

worldwide 2008 (with comparison to UK 2007)

The ten most commonly diagnosed cancers in females

worldwide 2008 (with comparison to UK 2007)

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Cancer cases and deaths across the world and in the uk august 2010

How many people die from cancer worldwide? August 2010

An estimated 7.6 million people died from cancer worldwide in 2008. Because of the size of the populations, almost two-thirds of these deaths occur in the developing countries, and around 2% occur in the UK.

Mortality across regions

Compared with incidence, the variations in cancer mortality across the world are much smaller, with less than a two-fold difference in rates between the regions. The highest mortality rates are seen in Southern Africa and the more developed regions of the world, such as the UK and the European Union, and the lowest rates are seen in the less developed regions, such as South-Central Asia and Africa.

The UK mortality rate is slightly higher than the average in the more developed regions of the world, and more than 15% higher than the average in the less developed regions.

Mortality in males

An estimated 4.2 million men died from cancer worldwide in 2008. Lung cancer is by far the biggest killer, accounting for almost one in four (23%) cancer deaths in men.

Liver and stomach cancers are also big cancer killers in men worldwide (11% each). The prognosis for liver cancer is generally poor and much of the variation in incidence and mortality across the world can be explained by the distribution of Hepatitis B and C infection. Stomach cancer incidence and mortality has declined in many developed nations due to improvements in food preservation and storage, and falls in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection.

In the UK, lung cancer also accounts for around one in four (24%) cancer deaths in men. Prostate cancer is responsible for relatively more deaths in UK men than worldwide (12% vs. 6%), whereas deaths from stomach (4%) and liver (2%) cancers are relatively less common.

Mortality in females

An estimated 3.3 million women died from cancer worldwide in 2008. Breast and lung cancers are the most common killers, accounting for 14% and 13% of deaths, respectively.

Colorectal (9%), cervical (8%), stomach (8%) and liver (7%) cancers are also big cancer killers in women worldwide.

In the UK, lung cancer accounts for around one in five (21%) cancer deaths in women. Breast cancer is the next biggest killer (16%). Deaths from cervical (1%), stomach (3%) and liver (2%) cancers are relatively less common in UK women compared to many countries worldwide.

Estimated worldwide cancer mortality 2008

(with comparison to actual UK 2008 data)

The ten most common cancer deaths in males worldwide

2008 (with comparison to UK 2008)

The ten most common cancer deaths in females worldwide

2008 (with comparison to UK 2008)

The estimated worldwide incidence and mortality data used in this report have been obtained from the International Agency for Research on Cancer GLOBOCAN 2008 database (http://globocan.iarc.fr/). Actual UK incidence (2007) and mortality (2008) data are provided as a comparison from figures collated by Cancer Research UK. Cancer data includes all malignant neoplasms excluding non-melanoma skin cancer. The ranks in red show the cancers that are in the world top ten, but not the UK.

For more in-depth information on cancer incidence and mortality worldwide, please visit our website at http://info.cancerresearchuk.org/cancerstats/, or download a copy of our Worldwide Cancer CancerStats report.

Statistical Information Team.

Email:stats.team@cancer.org.uk.

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