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Shipping. Agenda Part 1 . Introduction, Nomenclature, Major shipping companies Part 2. Charter - Voyage, time and others Part 3. Deck maintenance Part. Engine room and maintenance Part 5. Communication system and others. Deck Maintenance. Deck Side Crew Hierarchy Master

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shipping
Shipping
  • Agenda
    • Part 1. Introduction, Nomenclature, Major shipping companies
    • Part 2. Charter - Voyage, time and others
    • Part 3. Deck maintenance
    • Part. Engine room and maintenance
    • Part 5.Communication system and others
deck maintenance
Deck Maintenance
  • Deck Side Crew Hierarchy
    • Master
    • Chief Officer / Chief Mate
    • Second Officer / Second Mate
    • Third Officer / Third Mate
    • Fourth Officer / Fourth Mate
    • Fifth Officer / Fifth Mate
    • Cadets
    • Radio Officer
    • Purser
deck department
Deck Department
  • The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage.
vessel
Vessel
  • Funnel
  • Stern
  • Propeller and Rudder
  • Portside (left) and Starboard (right)
  • Anchor
  • Bulbous bow
  • Bow
  • Deck
  • Superstructure
key parts of vessel
Key Parts of Vessel
  • Anchor chain
  • Portside (Left side when viewed from rear)
  • Starboard side (Right side)
  • Hull
  • Crane/Grab
  • Lifeboats
  • Gangways
freeboard
Freeboard
  • The freeboard on commercial vessels is measured between the uppermost continuous deck and the waterline.
  • It is the distance from the waterline to the upper deck level, measured at the lowest point of where water can enter the ship.
load line
Load Line
  • The purpose of a load line is to ensure that a ship has sufficient freeboard and reserve buoyancy.
  • This must not be less than the freeboard marked on the Load Line Certificate issued to that ship.
  • This symbol must also be permanently marked, so that if the paint wears off it remains visible.
  • The load line makes it easy for anyone to determine if a ship has been overloaded.
  • The exact location of the Load Line is calculated and/or verified by a Classification Society and that society issues the relevant certificates.
  • This symbol, also called an international load line or Plimsoll line, indicates the maximum safe draft, and therefore the minimum freeboard for the vessel in various operating conditions.
load line11
Load Line
  • The letters on the Load line marks have the following meanings:
  • TF – Tropical Fresh Water
  • F – Fresh Water
  • T – Tropical Seawater
  • S – Summer Temperate Seawater
  • W – Winter Temperate Seawater
  • WNA – Winter North Atlantic
  • Fresh water is considered to have a density of 1000 kg/m³ and sea water 1025 kg/m³. Fresh water marks make allowance for the fact that the ship will float deeper in fresh water than salt water. A ship loaded to her Fresh Water mark in fresh water will float at her Summer Mark once she has passed into sea water. Similarly if loaded to her Tropical Fresh water mark she will float at her Tropical Mark once she passes in to sea water.
load line12
Load Line
  • The Summer load line is the primary load line and it is from this mark that all other marks are derived. The position of the summer load line is calculated from the Load Line Rules and depends on many factors such as length of ship, type of ship, type and number of superstructures, amount of sheer, bow height and so on. The horizontal line through the circle of the Plimsoll mark is at the same level as the summer load line.
  • The Winter load line is one forty-eighth of the summer load draft below the summer load line.
  • The Tropical load line is one forty-eighth of the summer load draft above the summer load line.The Fresh Water load line is an amount equal to millimetres above the summer load line where is the displacement in metric tonnes at the summer load draft and T is the metric tonnes per centimetre immersion at that draft.In any case where cannot be ascertained the fresh water load line is at the same level as the tropical load line.The position of the Tropical Fresh load line relative to the tropical load line is found in the same way as the fresh water load line is to the summer load line.The Winter North Atlantic load line is used by vessels not exceeding 100 metres in length when in certain areas of the North Atlantic Ocean during the winter period. When assigned it is 50 millimetres below the winter mark.
draft
Draft
  • The draft (or draught) of a ship's hull is the vertical distance between the waterline (loadline) and the bottom of the hull, with the thickness of the hull included.
  • Draft determines the minimum depth of water a ship or boat can safely navigate.
  • The draft can also be used to determine the weight of the cargo on board by calculating the total displacement of water and then using Archimedes’ principle.
ballast tank
Ballast Tank
  • It is a compartment within a boat or ship, that holds water.
  • A vessel may have a single ballast tank near its center or multiple ballast tanks typically on either side.
  • A large vessel typically will have several ballast tanks including double bottom tanks, wing tanks as well as forepeak and aftpeak tanks.
  • Adding ballast to a vessel lowers its center of gravity, and increases the draft of the vessel which is required for proper propeller immersion.
sea watch
Sea Watch
  • At sea, the mate (chief officer) on watch has three fundamental duties: navigate the ship, safely avoid traffic, and respond to any emergencies that may arise.
  • Mates generally stand watch with able seamen who act as helmsman and lookout.
  • The helmsman executes turns and the lookout reports dangers such as approaching ships.
  • These roles are often combined to a single helmsman/lookout and, under some circumstances, can eliminated completely.
  • The ability to smartly handle a ship is key to safe watchstanding.
sea watch21
Sea Watch
  • At sea, the mate (chief officer) on watch has three fundamental duties: navigate the ship, safely avoid traffic, and respond to any emergencies that may arise.
  • Mates generally stand watch with able seamen who act as helmsman and lookout.
  • The helmsman executes turns and the lookout reports dangers such as approaching ships.
  • These roles are often combined to a single helmsman/lookout and, under some circumstances, can eliminated completely.
  • The ability to smartly handle a ship is key to safe watchstanding.
anchor
Anchor
  • An anchor is an object, often made out of metal, that is used to attach a ship to the bottom of a body of water at a specific point.
  • There are two primary classes of anchors—temporary and permanent.
  • A permanent anchor is often called a mooring, and is rarely moved; it is quite possible the vessel cannot hoist it aboard but must hire a service to move or maintain it.
  • Vessels carry one or more temporary anchors which may be of different designs and weights.
  • An anchor works by resisting the movement force of the vessel which is attached to it.
  • There are two primary ways to do this—via sheer mass, and by "hooking" into the seabed
levels of deck
Levels of Deck
  • Boat deck: Especially on ships with sponsons, the deck area where lifeboats or the ship's gig are stored.
  • Boiler deck
  • Bridge deck: (a) The deck area including the helm and where the Officer of the Deck will be found.
  • Main deck: The highest deck of the hull (also called the upper deck, see below), usually but not always the weather deck. Anything above the main deck is superstructure.
  • Poop deck: The deck forming the roof of a poop or poop cabin, built on the upper deck and extending from the aft.
  • Side-deck: The upper deck of any structures
  • Upper deck: The highest deck of the hull.
steering wheel29
Steering Wheel
  • The wheel of a ship is the modern method of adjusting the angle of the rudder, in turn changing the direction of the ship. It is also called the helm, together with the rest of the steering mechanism
  • The wheel is typically connected to a mechanical or hydraulic system.
  • In some modern ships the wheel is replaced with a simple toggle that remotely controls an electro-mechanical or electro-hydraulic drive for the rudder, with a rudder position indicator presenting feedback to the helmsperson.
propeller
Propeller
  • Basically a type of fan which transmits power by converting rotational motion into thrust for propulsion of ship through water.
  • It is effected by rotating two or more twisted blades about a central shaft, in a manner analogous to rotating a screw.
  • The blades of a propeller act as rotating wings and produce force through application Newton’s third law.
rudder
Rudder
  • A rudder is a device used to steer a ship.
  • A rudder operates by redirecting the fluid past the hull or fuselage, thus imparting a turning or yawing motion to the craft.
  • In basic form, a rudder is a flat plane or sheet of material attached with hinges to the craft's stern, tail or after end.
  • Often rudders are shaped so as to minimize hydrodynamic or aerodynamic drag.
  • In larger vessels, cables, pushrods and hydraulics may be used to link rudders to steering wheels. In typical aircraft, pedals operate rudders via mechanical linkages.