Astronomical Catalogues - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Astronomical Catalogues PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Astronomical Catalogues

play fullscreen
1 / 113
Astronomical Catalogues
122 Views
Download Presentation
loe
Download Presentation

Astronomical Catalogues

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Astronomical Catalogues The science and art of collecting and disseminating data Carlos E. Lopez Universidad Nac. de San Juan, Argentina and Yale Southern Observatory

  2. Detectors Used in the Construction of Astrometric Catalogues photographic visual + telescope CCD visual 1990 1609 1887 past future

  3. What is Astrometry? • Astrometry is that part of astronomy dealing with the positions, motions and trigonometric distances of celestial objects.

  4. What is an Astrometric Survey? • An astrometric survey can be defined as a search oriented to finding those celestial objects meeting a given accuracy in their absolute or relative positions, motions or trigonometric distances. • Some of these surveys have been conducted with ground-based meridian circles, astrolabes or astrographic telescopes. Others have used or will use space-based instrumets. • In general, the final product of a Survey is a Catalogue.

  5. Astrometry’s Major Landmarks • 129 BC: Hipparchus publishes the first catalogue • 1609: Galileo starts to use the telescope in astronomical research • 1718: Halley* introduces the concept of proper motions • 1802: Herschel notes the relative orbital motion of Castor • 1838: Bessel determines the trigonometric parallax of 61 Cyg • 1887: The photographic plate is adopted as a detector • 1989: ESA launches the Hipparcos satellite * There is some evidence indicating that it was actually Nicholas of Cusa (circa 1400) who first mentioned the proper motion of stars

  6. Dictionary ASTRONOMICAL DATA: - is the alphanumeric code that describes a parameter or a property of a given celestial object CATALOG / CATALOGUE: - is a list of items, usually in a systematic order and with a description of each.

  7. Recycling and Evolution of the Astronomical Data Observation of the Celestial Object • Spectral Band • Magnitude • Spectral Type • Variability • Identification • Coordinates • Proper Motions • Multiplicity • Parallaxes • Identification General Catalogue Distribution and Use DetectionofErrors Comparison of Data Crossed Identification New Technologies New Technologies

  8. Two Main Different Types of Catalogues

  9. Example of OC Type: The Henry Draper Catalogue • 709 plates taken with the 8-inch Draper telescope from Cambridge (Mass.) • 1409 plates taken with a similar telescope from Arequipa (Perú). • 242093 stellar spectrum (artound 220000 stars) where clasified by Annie J. Cannon between 1911 and 1915.

  10. Example of CCC Type: El Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Catalogue (SAO)

  11. The Next Three Problems Once the type of catalogue to compile has been decided, we still have to: • order the Catalogue • designate each object • designate the combination: Catalogue + Object

  12. Possible Ways of Ordering the Data • Increasing Right Ascension for a given equinox • Increasing Right Ascension for a given equinox in declination bands • Discovery date • Discovery date in a given spectral band • Opposition date for a given year (Solar System)

  13. Possible Ways to Designate an Object

  14. Crossed Identification HR 2491 = HD 48915 = BD -16 1591 = FK4 257 = SAO 151881 = PPM 217626 = GSC 5949 2777 = HIP 32349 = 2MASS 06450887-1642566

  15. Sirius

  16. Sirius’ Cross ID, from SIMBAD 54 identifications

  17. Combination Catalogue + Object from: http://www.iee.org/Publish/Support/INSPEC/Document/Astron/index.cfm

  18. Modifications in the designations of Objects (as time goes by and technology changes) 1850: visual pair is discovered 1900: wide common proper motion companion is found 1975: B component is found to be spectroscopy binary 1985: C component is split by speckle interferometry 1990: additional speckle C component is resolved at a similar separation 1995: planet is found orbiting the A component 1998: second planet is found 2005: primary of B is resolved by long-baseline interferometry Hartkopf, W., and Mason, B. 2004. RevMexAA (SC) 21, 83-90

  19. Double Stars • There is a first reference to n1 and n2 Sgr in the Almagest • 1650 The duplicity of Mizar is annouced by Riccioli • By the end of the XVII century the duplicity of a Cen and a Cru is announced • 1667 Montanari points out the changes in brightness of Algol • 1779 Mayer publishes the first catalogue of double stars (80 entries) • 1802 W. Herschel admits that the changes in Castor may be the consequence of an orbital motion • 1827 Struve introduces the q and r parameters. Catalogue with 3134 pairs • 1837 first photographic observation of Mizar

  20. Double Stars • 1900 A new catalogue with 15,000 stars is published • 1919 First interferometric observations by K. Schwarzschild • 1921 Hertzsprung starts observations using photographic plates • 1970 Speckle interferometry observations • 1980 CHARA (Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy) is formed • 2002 The Tycho Double Stars Catalogue is announced by Fabricius et al.

  21. source: WDS web page

  22. The Washington Double Stars Catalogue (WDS) in numbers WDS Catalog(~12.5Mb) 00-06 hour section (~2.6Mb) 06-12 hour section (~3.6Mb) 12-18 hour section (~2.3Mb) 18-24 hour section (~4.0Mb) Format of the current WDS Notes file for the WDS (~1.0Mb) References and discoverer codes (~0.7Mb) Total 99798 systems

  23. The “Neglected stars” • List Set I: • Northern List (Dec > +20, num = 3072) • Equatorial List (-20 < Dec < +20, num = 2331) • Southern List (Dec < -20, num = 1039)List Set II: • Northern List (Dec > +20, num = 1860) • Equatorial List (-20 < Dec < +20, num = 2710) • Southern List (Dec < -20, num = 2062)List Set III: • Northern List (Dec > +20, num = 21,061) • Equatorial List (-20 < Dec < +20, num = 11,491) • Southern List (Dec < -20, num = 13,216) Total 58842 systems

  24. WDS main (sample)

  25. WDS (neglected stars)

  26. The case of LDS 11 = WDS 00181-5330 N WDS values: q= 45º;r = 19.0” (1960) E Values from USNO SA2.0: q= 75º;r= 19.0” (1996)

  27. LDS 4023 B? A

  28. LDS 4023

  29. LDS 4023

  30. Identification of LDS systems in 2MASS and SSS(R) (sample table) Lopez, C., 2005 RevMexAA (SC) (in press)

  31. Proper Motions • 1718: Halley announces the proper motion of the stars • 1775: Mayer publishes the first proper motions catalogue (998 stars) • 1783: Herschel suggests the idea of solar motion • 1887: the Astrographic Catalogue is started • 1916: Barnard discovers his famous star • 1926: Schlesinger starts the Yale Zones • 1947: Wright starts the NPM • 1950: Luyten starts to survey both hemispheres for high proper motion stars. • 1960: Giclas starts his surveys • 1965: Brower, Schill and Cesco start the SPM (YSO) • 1989: ESA launches the Hipparcos satallite • 2000: Monet announces the USNO B

  32. Parallaxes • 1580: First attempt by Tycho Brahe • 1781: “…the displacement due to the parallax must be less than 1 arcsec” said James Bradley when he attempted to determine the g Dra parallax • 1837: Parallax of Vega determined by Struve • 1838: Parallax of 61 Cyg determined by Bessel • 1890: Publication of parallaxes for 30 stars with errors in the order of +/-0.05 arcsec. • 1903: Systematic observations with photographic plates started by Schlesinger • 1924: First edition of the YPC (~1680 star) • 1935: Second edition of the YPC (~4100 stars)

  33. Parallaxes • 1952: Third edition of the YPC (~5800 stars) • 1981: First parallaxes determined with CCD • 1995: Fourth edition of the YPC (~8100) star • 1997: Hipparcos results • 2001: Henry et al. results from CTIOPI (CTIO Parallax Investigation) many nearby stars, one of them as close as 5.5 pc. • 2002: Scholz et al. present new nearby stars with d<25 pc. • 2003: Teegarden et al. dicovery of a star between 2.7 and 3.6 pc (using SkyMorph!!) • 2003: Phan-Bao et al. present new stars within 25 pc (DENIS’ mining) • 2005: Jao et al. present new results from the CTIOPI program

  34. Parallaxes Jao, W-Ch. et al. 2005 AJ. 129, 1954

  35. 1990 before after Number of entries in most of the astrometic catalogues # stars >> 106 # stars << 106

  36. The MEGA Catalogues Over the past 15 years four catalogues -with well over a million entries each- have been published. They are called MEGA Catalogues: Non-Astrometric Astrometric • 2MASS • DENIS • SDSS • Guide Star Catalogue (GSC) • USNO (A and B series) • SuperCosmos Sky Survey (SSS) • UCAC

  37. Guide Star Catalogue (GSC): the Pioneer • The GSC was constructed as support for the HST • Over 19 million objects in the 6th to 15th mag. range • Astrometry is available at the epochs of the individual plates used in the GSC (no proper motions) • Reference stars were selected from AGK3, SAOC, and CPC • Extensive analysis against the Carlsberg Automatic Meridian Circle data showed that GSC absolute positional errors from plate center to edge vary from 0.5" to 1.1" in the north and from 1.0" to 1.6" in the south. • Different improvements have yielded the following realeses: GSC I (1.0, 1.1, and 1.2) GSC II (2.0, 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3) Lasker, B. et al. 1990. AJ 99, 2019

  38. Schmidt Plates in GSC I

  39. Schmidt Plates in GSC II

  40. GSPC I is an all-sky set of photoelectrically determined BV sequences in the magnitude range from 9 to 15, generally near the centers of the fields of the GSC-I plates. Lasker, B., Sturch, C., Lopez, C. et all. 1988, ApJS, 68, 1.

  41. Comparison GSC 1.0 vs. CAMC (1, 2, and 3) Taff, L. et al. 1990. ApJ 353, L45 – L48

  42. Comparison GSC 1.0 vs. CAMC (1, 2, and 3) Taff, L. et al. 1990. ApJ 353, L45 – L48

  43. Comparison GSC 1.0 vs. GSC 1.2

  44. Quick Fact Sheet on GSC 1.1 vs. GSC 2.2

  45. GSPC II is generally an extension of GSPC I sequences to V=19 in (B), V and R passbands based on CCD photometry. Its purpose is the calibration of the GSC-II. Bucciarelli, et al. A&A 368, pp 335-346, 2001

  46. Other recentw major astrometric catalogues USNO-B1.0 SSS UCAC

  47. The USNO-B1: summary • Monet, D.; Levine, S.; Canzian, B. et al. 2003 AJ 125, 948 • Number of sources: 1,045,913,669 • Number of observations: 3,643,201,733 • Number of plates: 7,435 • Completeness down to V= 21 • 0.2 arcsec accuracy at J2000 • 0.3 mag accuracy in up to 5 colors yes, but …

  48. DSS frame around Hip 5164 Hip 5164

  49. USNO B1.0 frame around Hip 5164

  50. The Case of LDS 4023