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Best lines in Romeo & Juliet. By Ms. Secko. The Greatest love story of all time…. Romeo and Juliet , by William Shakespeare. The power of love Act 1, Scene 5, Page 2. “The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand, And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.

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the greatest love story of all time
The Greatest love story of all time…
  • Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare
the power of love act 1 scene 5 page 2
The power of loveAct 1, Scene 5, Page 2

“The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand,

And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.

Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!

For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

Literary Technique: Rhyme

rhyme
Rhyme

“The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand,

And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.

Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!

For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

Using rhyme in poetry gives a poem a repetitive quality by sound without repeating a line or phrase. The use of rhyme allows poetry to gain a songlike quality.

what does it add
What does it Add?

“The measure done, I’ll watch her place of stand,

And, touching hers, make blessèd my rude hand.

Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight!

For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.”

Through the use of rhyme, Shakespeare is able to capture an enamored Romeo who is surrounded by the “notes” of love. His rhyming speech IS the music behind his passion, Juliet. Through rhyme, the audience is able to understand Romeo’s deep feelings for Juliet. We want them to be together!

is it true love act 1 scene 5
Is it True love?Act 1, Scene 5

ROMEO

[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand

This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:

My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand

To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET

Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,

Which mannerly devotion shows in this;

For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch,

And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

Literary Technique: Allusion

allusion
Allusion

ROMEO

[To JULIET] If I profane with my unworthiest hand

This holy shrine, the gentle fine is this:

My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand

To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

JULIET

Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much,

Which mannerly devotion shows in this;

For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch,

And palmto palm is holypalmers' kiss.

what does it add1
What does it add?

ROMEO

[To JULIET] unworthiest hand…holy shrine…pilgrims…

JULIETpilgrim…hand…devotion…saintshave hands that pilgrims' hands do touch…and palmto palm is holypalmers' kiss.

Shakespeare’s allusion, or reference, to God brings this relationship to a new level. Using biblical language assures the audience that this relationship is different than any other; it is

Holy, true and blessed! We, too, are in love – with them!

the consequence of hate act 3 scene 1 page 5
The consequence of hateAct 3, Scene 1, Page 5

MERCUTIO: Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man

Literary Technique: Pun

slide10
Pun

MERCUTIO: Ay, ay, a scratch, a scratch. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a graveman

The use of pun, or play on words, is to suggest two possible meanings. In this case, the two meanings for “grave” are 1) serious, 2) buried. Naturally, the characters assume Mercutio is going to take his wound seriously and seek help. The audience, on the author hand, understands the foreshadowing of Mercutio’s death. The audience is deeply saddened.

death act 3 scene 1 page 5
DeathAct 3, Scene 1, Page 5

MERCUTIO: A plague o' both your houses!

Literary Technique: Metaphor

death act 3 scene 1 page 51
DeathAct 3, Scene 1, Page 5

MERCUTIO: A plague o' both your houses!

Literary Technique: Metaphor

what does it add2
What does it add?

MERCUTIO: A plague o' both your houses!

By using the “plague” metaphor, Mercutio is suggesting ultimate doom. Not only will there be death, but the audience knows that there will be pain and suffering on both sides. A plague does not discriminate, it will kill everyone in its path regardless of who you are, Capulet or Montague. Shakespeare’s metaphor sends chills up his audience’s spine – we fear the end results!

the end
The End

It’s not what is said, but, rather, how it’s said that makes it memorable….