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ISAW Workshop #2: Teaching Integration of Sources in Writing
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  1. ISAW Workshop #2:Teaching Integration of Sources in Writing Belinda Braunstein, UC Merced October 27, 2012

  2. Workshop Outcomes When you finish this 90 minute workshop, you will… • Be able to use current MLA parenthetical citation format (refresher for teachers) • Have an overview of a four-step method you can use with your students for integrating direct quotes from sources in an essay, including: • Quote selection/reason for inclusion • Ways to introduce a quote • How to follow the quote • Reviewing what they’ve included for usefulness and format

  3. Three-Minute Discussion What types of writing do your students do that might include quoted text?

  4. What is a “dropped quote”? Example: California law prevents the killing of mountain lions except for specific lions that have proven to be a threat to humans or livestock. "Fish and game is even blocked from keeping mountain lions from killing the endangered desert bighorn sheep" (Perry B4). It’s cited correctly, but we don’t know who this is. Also, how is the quote related? Correction: California law prevents the killing of mountain lions except for specific lions that have proven to be a threat to humans or livestock. The noted conservationist Tony Perry points out that, ironically, "Fish and game is even blocked from keeping mountain lions from killing the endangered desert bighorn sheep" (B4). http://writingcenter.gmu.edu/resources-template.php?id=1 Correction: California law prevents the killing of mountain lions except for specific lions that have proven to be a threat to humans or livestock. The noted conservationist Tony Perry points out that, ironically, "Fish and game is even blocked from keeping mountain lions from killing the endangered desert bighorn sheep" (B4). There is something wrong with a law that prevents us from protecting an endangered species from a non-threatened species that is reducing its numbers. This is why we must reconsider the mountain lion’s legal status as a “specially protected species.” http://writingcenter.gmu.edu/resources-template.php?id=1

  5. How to Avoid Dropped Quotes • Have the quote there for a reason, such as to provide support for your position • Introduce the quote • Explain and expand on the quote immediately after • Review your quotes for usefulness and correct format when editing

  6. Step 1 Quote Selection and Reason for Inclusion

  7. Don’t forget: You can copy-paste this slide into other presentations, and move or resize the poll.

  8. Step 2 Introducing a Quote

  9. Choose the Best Source! (Example slide for students) You are writing a paper on the 19th Amendment. Who might be the best source to cite? • Susan B. Anthony, about the importance of the female vote • A friend from school who plans to vote now that she is 18 • A page from Wikipedia with some facts

  10. Use a “signal phrase”! journalist and author • According to Jane Doe, "..." • As Jane Doe goes on to explain, "..." • Characterized by John Doe, the society is "..." • As one critic points out, "..." • John Doe believes that "..." • Jane Doe claims that "..." • In the words of John Doe, "..." Also, if the reader doesn’t know who the quoted person is, give the person’s credentials in the signal phrase, too. Why should we care what they say?

  11. Words to Introduce Quotes acknowledges, adds, admits, affirms, agrees, argues, asserts, believes, claims, comments, compares, confirms, contends, declares, demonstrates, denies, disputes, emphasizes, endorses, grants, illustrates, implies, insists, notes, observes, points out, reasons, refutes, rejects, reports, responds, states, suggests, thinks, underlines, writes

  12. Example of Dropped Quote Correction (AP level?) The men in Stephen Crane's short story, "The Open Boat," are courageous; they want to live. "The idealistic virtues of bravery, fortitude, and integrity possess no meaning in a universe that denies the importance of man" (Stein 151). The ideals of their native environment, then, mean little when confronted with the harshness of the open ocean. These men finally realize that it is possible they will die. The men in Stephen Crane's short story, "The Open Boat," are courageous; they want to live. "The idealistic virtues of bravery, fortitude, and integrity possess no meaning in a universe that denies the importance of man" (Stein 151). The ideals of their native environment, then, mean little when confronted with the harshness of the open ocean. These men finally realize that it is possible they will die. The men in Stephen Crane's short story, "The Open Boat," are courageous; they want to live. As critic William Bysshe Stein points out, however, "the idealistic virtues of bravery, fortitude, and integrity possess no meaning in a universe that denies the importance of man" (151). The ideals of their native environment, then, mean little when confronted with the harshness of the open ocean. These men finally realize that it is possible they will die. The men in Stephen Crane's short story, "The Open Boat," are courageous; they want to live. As critic William Bysshe Stein points out, however, "the idealistic virtues of bravery, fortitude, and integrity possess no meaning in a universe that denies the importance of man" (151). The ideals of their native environment, then, mean little when confronted with the harshness of the open ocean. These men finally realize that it is possible they will die. Source: http://writing2.richmond.edu/writing/wweb/introquo.html

  13. Step 3 How to Follow a Quote

  14. Example by a freshman English is also already considered the de facto language of the United States, for many citizens consider English as the key to success and prosperity in the U.S. For instance, Charles Krauthammer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and commentator, states, “He may speak [his native language] in the street and proudly teach it to his children, but he knows that his future and certainly theirs lie inevitably in learning English as the gateway to American life” (540). Living in America, everyone knows that in order to thrive and succeed, s/he would have to understand and practice English. English is also already considered the de facto language of the United States, for many citizens consider English as the key to success and prosperity in the U.S. For instance, Charles Krauthammer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and commentator, states, “He may speak [his native language] in the street and proudly teach it to his children, but he knows that his future and certainly theirs lie inevitably in learning English as the gateway to American life” (540). Living in America, everyone knows that in order to thrive and succeed, s/he would have to understand and practice English.

  15. Step 4 Review What You’ve Included

  16. Well done.