putting geographic information ontologies to work the case of geospatial science n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Putting Geographic Information Ontologies to Work The Case of Geospatial Science PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Putting Geographic Information Ontologies to Work The Case of Geospatial Science

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 37

Putting Geographic Information Ontologies to Work The Case of Geospatial Science - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 70 Views
  • Uploaded on

GEOINFO 2013 – XIV Brazilian Symposium on Geoinformatics – November 2013. Putting Geographic Information Ontologies to Work The Case of Geospatial Science . Helen Couclelis Geography Department University of California Santa Barbara California, USA.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Putting Geographic Information Ontologies to Work The Case of Geospatial Science' - liona


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
putting geographic information ontologies to work the case of geospatial science

GEOINFO 2013 – XIV Brazilian Symposium on Geoinformatics – November 2013

Putting Geographic Information Ontologies to WorkThe Case of Geospatial Science

Helen Couclelis

Geography Department

University of California

Santa Barbara

California, USA

is giscience working hard enough for us
Is GIScience ‘working’ hard enough for us?
  • great theoretical work = great practical benefits?
  • Werner Kuhn
  • VGI, trust, and clean wells in Africa
  • Kathleen Stewart & Christophe Claramunt
  • Call for papers:
      • Spatio-temporal theories and models for environmental, urban and social sciences
  • Gilberto Câmara & team
  • geoinformatics and … and… and…
and helen couclelis
and Helen Couclelis?
  • Early enthusiasm
  • models!planning!
  • spatial interaction, CA, ABM *
  • Mature doubts
  • uncertainty beyond data
  • forecasts and policy
  • Mature enthusiasm
  • the ‘big picture’
  • ontologyand representation in space and time

*EU’s FuturICT shortlisted project

why o ntology what o ntology
Why ontology? What Ontology?...
  • from Plato to SUMO and DOLCE
    • Worldversusmicro-worlds
  • at first
  • interoperability
  • then

cognition, language, structure, meaning, concepts, measurements, physical /non-physical entities, space, time, user, culture, reality, philosophy

  • recently
  • micro-ontologies
  • microtheoriesand the Semantic Web
note gruber s agent centered definition
Note Gruber’s agent-centered definition:
  • An ontology is “a formal, explicit specification of a sharedconceptualization”
  • “… an ontology is a description … of the concepts and relationships that can exist for an agent or a community of agents.”
  • Ontologies must “constrain the possible interpretationsfor the defined terms.”
o ntologies are social artifacts
ontologies are social artifacts
  • “The ultimate source of meaning is the physical world and the agents who use signs to represent entities in the world and their intentionsconcerning them”.
  • (Sowa)
overview
Overview
  • (Introduction)
  • Representation and the Big Picture in GISc
  • Ontologies of Geographic Information
  • A micro-ontology generating engine?
  • Geodesign: an application
  • Questions & Discussion
slide10
This is not a pipe

The map is not the territory

The model is not reality

Representation and the Big Picture

giscience and the big picture questions
GIScience and the big-picturequestions
  • frameworks, general theories, ontologies, base models
  • “The challenge of representing fields-objects in a computer environment” (Camara 2000)
  • “Field-object integration through a common base model” (Kjenstad 2006)
  • “A general theory to bring many previous ideas under a single umbrella” (Goodchild et al. 2007)
  • “Need for a conceptually unifying data model” (Voudouris 2010)
slide12

Camara et al. 2000Gangemi & Mika 2003 Kuhn 2001

Couclelis 2010

Voudouris 2010

Goodchild et al. 2007

Kjenstad 2006

Two different paradigms in geospatial representation. Spatial-primitives centered (left) and concept-centered (right). Source: M. Kavouras and M. Kokla (2008) Theories of Geographic Concepts, p. 296.

slide13

many

commonalitiesamongtheseauthors

slide14

The same concepts are categorized differently depending on the context

http://vissim.uwf.edu/VOTT/VOTT_desc.htm

ontologies of geographic information
‘Ontologies of geographic information’*

sense-perceptionsobservationsdata informationknowledgewisdom

???

?

At every step, we ask:

“what is the meaning of_?”

What gives information its meaning?

How are data transformed into knowledge?

Why model information and not directly the world?

*Couclelis 2010, IJGIS, December

slide16

What gives information its meaning?

    • semantics on top of structure (syntax)
  • How are data transformed into knowledge?
    • by being integrated into some coherent story
  • Why model information and not directly the world?
    • Information entails a source and a decoder (agent)
modeling information not the world three principles
Modeling information, not the world:three principles
  • Foregrounding the perspective of the user
  • Distinguishing a linked sequence layers of varying degrees of semantic richness
  • Selecting data through criteria resulting from the users’ purpose-oriented semantic choices
slide18
A representation is constructed in a particular way fora purpose weather maps forscientific study school text illustration TV weather forecast

river models fornavigation company water resource agency cross-border regulation

Purpose comes from the intentionality of the user

a GIScience representation (model) is constructed in response to some user need

my 2010 framework the static version
My 2010 framework: the static version

The foundations

information

spacetime framework

purpose

The key ingredients

spacetime granules

classes of properties

GI Constructs (GICs)

Thestructure

  • representation levels

Most ontologies are represented as trees or semi-lattices

slide21

This one is a lattice, with information and spacetimeframework at one end, and intentionality at the other

The foundations

information

spacetime framework

purpose

The key ingredients

spacetime granules

classes of properties

GI Constructs (GICs)

Thestructure

  • representation levels
  • lattice
slide22
The foundations

information

spacetime framework

purpose

The key ingredients

spacetime granules

classes of properties

GI Constructs (GICs)

Thestructure

representation levels

  • lattice

Actually, it should be this way around

slide23

Geographic Information Constructs (GICs)

topons, chronons, and codes across 7 property domains

slide26

A somewhat similar idea from more practical folks…

A review and assessment of land-use change models: dynamics of space, time, and human choice

By Agarwal, Chetan; Green, Glen M.; Grove, J. Morgan; Evans, Tom P.; Schweik, Charles M. (2002)

Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-297. Newton Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northeastern Research Station.

the framework 3 years later
The framework, 3 years later…
  • A micro-ontology generating engine?...
slide28

Ontology >> language for model design

ontologies are models of models

micro-theories are models

a model is a micro-theory

modeling is a language

a model is a statement about the world

language has semantics, syntax and pragmatics

building a model is design-ing

designed things reflect designer’s purpose

purpose is supported by function

a structure emerges
A structure emerges…

Syntactics

structure

Model designer

purpose

perspective

Semantics

meaning

Pragmatics

context

slide30

Unpacking the ‘Ontologies’ framework

Pragmatics

Semantics

Syntax

SS

context

Purpose

measurements

context

Patterns

Data structures Interpretations Micro-ontologies

the temporal extension
The temporal extension
  • One additional key ingredient:
  • R-event
  • For each level, a change in information that significantly alters the structure of GICs at that level
  • ‘significant’ is relative to purpose!
  • “Information: a difference that makes a difference”Gregory Bateson
  • And the R-event types by level are…
some f eatures of the framework
Some features of the framework
  • Guides construction of micro-ontologies (and possibly process models)
  • Integrates design & analysis through user perspective
  • Adds context-relevant notions of time, change and uncertainty
  • Is compatible with much other work in geographic information science
and now something more applied
And now, something more applied!
  • Geodesigning from the inside out
slide36

My advisor used to say…

  • “there is nothing as practical as a good theory”
  • Searching for practical solutions by becoming more abstract
what next
What next?...

Tentative, but a different way of looking at geospatial representation

Continue connecting with literature

Formalize!

Try deriving micro-ontologies foruse with the Semantic Web

Experiment with environmental and other process models