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LEARNING COMMUNITIES: Webs of Life, Literacy & Learning. Ron Faris Oct. 4, 2007 Truro http://members.shaw.ca/rfaris. THIS WE KNOW, ALL THINGS ARE CONNECTED LIKE

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slide1

LEARNING

COMMUNITIES:

Webs of Life, Literacy & Learning

Ron Faris

Oct. 4, 2007 Truro

http://members.shaw.ca/rfaris

slide2

THIS WE KNOW,ALL THINGS ARE CONNECTED LIKE

THE BLOOD WHICH UNITES ONE FAMILY .WHATEVER BEFALLS THE EARTH,BEFALLS THE SONS AND DAUGHTERSOF THE EARTH.MAN DID NOT WEAVE THE WEB OF LIFE;HE IS MERELY A STRAND IN IT.WHATEVER HE DOES TO THE WEB, HE DOES TO HIMSELF.Ted Perry, inspired by Chief Seattle

key global trends
KEY GLOBAL TRENDS
  • Three inter-related drivers of change
      • Globalization – market ideology
      • Technological change
      • New knowledge and learning
  • From resource-based to knowledge-based economy
      • Human & social capital
      • New literacies
      • Learning technologies
knowledge based economy
KNOWLEDGE-BASED ECONOMY
  • Constant change = Continuous learning
  • Investment in education/learning results in significant returns to organizations, individuals

& society

  • Human & social capital are “intangible assets”
  • Human capital: Formal educational attainment
  • Social capital: Trust, networking & shared values
  • Social/human capital synergy:
    • Social capital the cradle of human capital
learning community initiatives
LEARNING COMMUNITY INITIATIVES
  • EUROPE
      • OECD Learning Regions - Spain, France, Denmark-Sweden & UK
      • Learning Communities Network & Test-beds - UK
      • Learning Villages - Finland, Portugal & Italy
  • AUSTRALIA
      • Learning Communities Network
      • Victoria State Learning Towns
  • CANADA
      • Community Learning Network projects in B.C.
      • South Island Learning Community (SILC) project
a learning region model
A LEARNING REGION MODEL

INDIVIDUAL

LEARNING

ECONOMIC

COMPETITIVENESS

SOCIAL

CAPITAL

ORGANIZATIONAL

LEARNING

SOCIAL

INCLUSION

Source: OECD, 2001

learning communities an operational definition
LEARNING COMMUNITIES: AN OPERATIONAL DEFINITION

Neighbourhoods, villages, towns, cities or regions that explicitly use lifelong learning as an organizing principle and social/cultural goal in order to promote collaboration of their civic, economic, public, voluntary and education sectors to enhance social, economic and environmental conditions on a sustainable, inclusive basis

“communities of place”

learning communities a nested concept
LEARNING COMMUNITIES: A NESTED CONCEPT
  • LEARNING COMMUNITIES OF PLACE
      • Learning Organizations
        • Peter Senge
      • Academic Learning Communities
        • Alexander Meiklejohn
      • Communities of Practice
        • Etienne Wenger
      • Learning Circles
        • Miles Horton & Kurt Lewin
purposes
PURPOSES
  • SUSTAINABLE TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE
      • Economic
      • Environmental
      • Social/cultural
  • SOCIAL INCLUSION
      • Building First Nation & non-First Nation bridges
  • COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING
      • Human capital - Individual attainment
      • Social capital - Trust, Networks, Shared Values
      • Built capital - Infrastructure
      • Natural capital - Ecology
learning communities a sustainable future

LEARNING

LEARNING COMMUNITIES: A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

Community Partners

civic

economic

public

education

voluntary

Inter-related Strategies

adult literacy

community econ development

expanded IT use

at-risk youth initiatives

Outcomes

economic regeneration

social inclusion

increased community capacity

lifelong learning

Input

learning community partnerships
LEARNING COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

CIVIC

Municipal - Band

Shire - Prov-Fed

ECONOMIC

Private - Social

PARTNERSHIPS

PUBLIC

Libraries - Museums

Social - Health Agencies

EDUCATION

K -20

COMMUNITY/

VOLUNTARY

learning communities success determinants
LEARNING COMMUNITIES:SUCCESS DETERMINANTS
  • 3 P’s of success
    • Partnership - learning to build links among all sectors and mobilize their shared resources
    • Participation - learning to foster participation of all learners and involve the public in the policy process
    • Performance - learning to assess progress and benchmark good practice
learning communities the 3 p s
LEARNING COMMUNITIES: THE 3 P’S

Performance

Assessment & Benchmarking

Civic, Economic, Public (e.g. libraries, health & social services), Education, & Voluntary/Community

Partnership

Info Tech

Learners, Organizations,

Ethnic & Aboriginal

communities

Media, Public forums, Website/Listservs & E-portfolios

Participation

adult literacy an investment
ADULT LITERACY: AN INVESTMENT

A one percent rise in adult literacy scores is associated with an eventual 2.5 percent relative rise in labour productivity and a 1.5 percent rise

in GDP per head (C$18 billion)

Three times greater effect than investment in physical capital

“…more important to economic growth than producing highly skilled graduates”

C. D. HOWE INSTITUTE (2005) Coulombe & Tremblay

sustainable triple bottom line
SUSTAINABLE TRIPLEBOTTOM LINE

SOCIAL

ENTERPRISE

IKEA

SUSTAINABILITY

ECO-JUSTICE

south island learning community silc project
SOUTH ISLAND LEARNING COMMUNITY (SILC) PROJECT

GOALS

  • Bridging First Nation & non-FN Communities
  • Building Community & Organizational Capacity
  • Testing Innovative Literacy Approaches:
    • Open Source Technologies
    • Learner E-Portfolio & Learning Plans
  • Developing Service-Learning Opportunities
silc formative evaluation
SILC: FORMATIVE EVALUATION
  • From Awareness to Involvement
  • From Involvement to Understanding
  • From Understanding to Commitment
community values
COMMUNITY VALUES
  • Balance citizen rights & responsibilities
  • Devolve resources and power to communities with increased capacity of learning and information & communications technologies
  • Mobilize human/social capital to foster sustainable local economic development, social inclusion & community capacity
slide21
Men and women have within themselves and their communities the spiritual and intellectual resources adequate to the solution of their own problems.

Canadian Association for Adult Education

Statement of Purposes, 1946

the web of learning learning communities
THE WEB OF LEARNING: LEARNING COMMUNITIES

Private & Social Enterprise

Local

Government

Economic

Sector

Community

Colleges

Universities

LEARNERS

Civic

Sector

Education

Sector

Service

Clubs

Institutes

Schools

Libraries

Museums

Public

Sector

Voluntary

Sector

Community

Associations

Health Agencies

Social Service Agencies

Faith

Communities

senge creating quality communities
SENGE:Creating Quality Communities

“Building learning organizations is not an individual task. It demands a shift that goes all the way to the core of our culture. We have drifted into a culture that fragments our thoughts, that detaches the world from the self and the self from the community.

We are so focused on our security that we don’t see the price we pay:living in bureaucratic organizations where the wonder and joy of learning have no place. Thus, we are losing the spaces to dance with the ever-changing patterns of life. We need to invent a new learning model for business, education, health care, government and the family.This invention will come from the patient, concerted efforts of communities of people invoking aspiration and wonder. As these communities manage to produce fundamental changes, we will regain our memory – the memory of the community nature of the self and the poetic nature of language and the world – the memory of the whole.”

selected bibliography early learning
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY:EARLY LEARNING
  • Keating, D. & C. Hertzman, 1999, Developmental Health and the Wealth of Nations: Social, Biological and Educational Dynamics, The Guilford Press, New York.
  • L. Irwin et al, 2007, Early Child Development: A Powerful Equalizer, WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, Geneva.
  • Schweinhart, L., 2006, The High/Scope Perry Preschool Study Through Age 40: Summary, Conclusions, and Frequently Asked Questions, High/Scope Educational Research Foundation,

Ypsilanti, Michigan.

adult literacy roi
ADULT LITERACY ROI
  • Coulombe, S. & J. Tremblay, 2005, Public Investment in Skills: Are Canadian Governments Doing Enough?, C. D. Howe Institute Commentary, No.217, Toronto.
  • Hartley, R., & J. Horne, 2006, Social and economic benefits of improved adult literacy, National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Adelaide.
  • Sticht, T., 1999, Adult Basic Education: Strategies to Increase Returns on Investment (ROI), Applied Behavioral & Cognitive Sciences, Inc.
a permanent underclass
A PERMANENT UNDERCLASS?
  • Butterwick, S. & C. White, 2006, A Path Out of Poverty: Helping BC Income Assistance Recipients Upgrade Their Education, CCPA, Vancouver.
  • Institute for COMPETITIVENESS & PROSPERITY, 2007, Prosperity, inequality, and poverty, Working Paper 10, (September 2007), Toronto.

- Morisette, R., & Zhang, X., 2006, “Revisiting wealth inequality”, PERSPECTIVES (Dec. 2006), Statistics Canada, Ottawa.

- Myers, K., & Lebroucker, P., 2006, Too Many Left Behind: Canada’s Adult Education and Training System, Research Report W/34 Work Network, CPRN, Ottawa.

human social capital
HUMAN & SOCIAL CAPITAL

- Duke,C. et al, 2006, Making knowledge work: Sustaining learning communities and regions, NIACE, Leicester.

- Mowbray, M., 2005, “Community, the State and social capital impact assessment”, Rebalancing the social and economic: Learning, partnership and place, NIACE, Leicester. Pp. 47-61.

- OECD, 2001, The Wellbeing of Nations: the Role of Human and Social Capital, Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, Paris.

nordic vs n american models
NORDIC vs N. AMERICAN MODELS

- Brooks, J. & Hwong, T., 2006, The Social Benefits and Economic Costs of Taxation: A Comparison of High- and Low- Tax Countries, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, Ottawa.

- Rubenson, K., 2006, “The Nordic Model of Lifelong Learning”, Compare: A journal of comparative education, Vol. 36, Issue 3 (Sept. 2006), pp. 327-341.

- Veeman, A. N., 2004, Adult Learning in Canada and Sweden: A Comparative Study of Four Sites, unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.

pan canadian literacy strategy
PAN-CANADIAN LITERACY STRATEGY
  • Alexander, C., 2007, Literacy Matters: A Call for Action, T D Bank Financial Group, Toronto.
  • Faris, R., & Blunt, A., 2007, Report on the CMEC Forum on Adult Literacy, Prince George, British Columbia (June 19-20, 2006), Council of Ministers of Education Canada, Toronto.
  • HRDC, 2005, Towards A Fully Literate Canada, National Advisory Committee on Literacy and Essential Skills (Bradshaw Cmtee), Ottawa.