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Presentation of Preliminary Draft: Recreational Resources. 2007 Comprehensive Land Use Plan Commission Meeting – May 3, 2006 Grand Lake Stream. RECREATIONAL RESOURCES: CHANGES SINCE 1997 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •. Introduction The Recreation Landscape

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Presentation of preliminary draft recreational resources

Presentation of Preliminary Draft:Recreational Resources

2007 Comprehensive Land Use Plan

Commission Meeting – May 3, 2006

Grand Lake Stream


Recreational resources changes since 1997
RECREATIONAL RESOURCES: CHANGES SINCE 1997• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Introduction

  • The Recreation Landscape

  • Recreational Activities and Facilities

  • Historic Trends and Future Demand

  • LURC Regulatory Approach

  • Recreational Resource Issues

  • Goals & Policies


Introduction
INTRODUCTION• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Uniqueness of recreational experience in remote setting

    • Exceptional recreational resources

    • Concern over increased use and development

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • Principal value status

    • Economic value to the state, jurisdiction, and neighboring towns


The recreation landscape
THE RECREATION LANDSCAPE• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Private lands

    • Public lands

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • North Maine Woods, Inc.

    • Private lands held by non-profit conservation organizations

    • Conservation easements


Uses and facilities
USES AND FACILITIES• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Types of impacts caused by recreational uses and facilities

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • Impacts caused by location of recreational uses and facilities

    • Recognition that intensive recreational use could harm jurisdiction’s resource and character values

  • Reduced emphasis on:

    • Impacts of specific activities and facilities


Historic trends
HISTORIC TRENDS• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Organization:

    • Use levels: How much use is being accommodated?

    • Types of uses: How is the nature of recreating changing?

    • Recreationist attributes: Who is recreating?

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Static trends (Recreationist attributes - mostly Maine residents; decline in hunting and fishing licenses; continued increase in whitewater rafting and snowmobiling)

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • Changing trends and new information (recreationist attributes - age considerations; declining public use in remote recreation areas; increased popularity of motorized recreation; increasing interest in nature-based recreation)

    • Complexity of trends analysis, lack of data specific to the jurisdiction


Future demand
FUTURE DEMAND• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Demand for recreational opportunities will continue to increase

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • Recognition that recreational use is in constant flux

    • Recognition that recreational use is polarizing towards two extremes: Backcountry non-motorized primitive recreation with minimal accommodations, and recreation tied to a strong demand for amenities (including motorized recreation and nature-based recreation)

    • Factors affecting demand (rate of loss of recreational opportunities elsewhere; level of focus on tourism marketing; economic health of Maine and Northeast)


Regulatory approach
REGULATORY APPROACH• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Promoting primitive recreation and diversified, non-intensive, nonexclusive use of recreational resources

    • Protecting primitive recreational resources and uses via zoning, coexistence with other uses (in M-GN), consideration of recreational resources in LURC’s development review

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • Approach to regulating recreational facilities based on impact and scale


Issues
ISSUES• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Continued emphasis on:

    • Impacts of development

    • Water use conflicts

    • Existing and emerging recreational uses and facilities (sporting camps, commercial whitewater rafting, campsites and campgrounds, alpine ski areas, and emerging uses and facilities)

  • New or increased emphasis on:

    • Public use of private land (public access)

    • Broader recreational use conflicts (motorized vs. non-motorized uses)

    • Nature-based tourist facilities

    • Existing and emerging recreational uses and facilities (ATV’s, sporting camps)


Goals
GOALS• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • 1997 Goal

    • Conserve and protect the natural beauty and unspoiled qualities of the waters, shorelands, mountains, plant and animal habitats, forests, scenic vistas, trails and other natural and recreational features in order to protect and enhance their values for a range of public recreational uses.

  • Proposed Goal

    • Conserve the recreational resources that are fundamental to maintaining and enhancing diverse, abundant recreational opportunities.


Policies

  • Protect remote, undeveloped and other significant recreational areas, including such areas around rivers and streams, trails, ponds and lakes, to protect their natural character for primitive recreational activities such as canoeing, hiking, fishing and nature study.

  • Encourage traditional outdoor recreation by working with landowners to conserve the natural resources of the jurisdiction and to enhance recreational opportunities.

  • Protect remoteness and the natural resource values that distinguish and enhance recreational pursuits.

  • Promote primitive recreational activities and encourage diversified, non-intensive, and nonexclusive use of recreational resources. Nonexclusive uses are those in which a wide range of people can participate, generally at a reasonable cost.

  • Encourage diversified, non-intensive, and nonexclusive use of recreational resources.

POLICIES• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1997 Policies Proposed Policies


Policies1
POLICIES recreational areas, including such areas around rivers and streams, trails, ponds and lakes, to protect their natural character for primitive recreational activities such as canoeing, hiking, fishing and nature study.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1997 Policies Proposed Policies

  • Accommodate a range of recreational uses and facilities in appropriate locations, based on the level of use, size and scale, and compatibility with existing recreational and non-recreational uses. Specifically:

    a. Direct intensive recreational uses and facilities to areas most appropriate for growth, and near existing services and infrastructure.

    b. Accommodate less intensive, nonexclusive recreational uses and facilities in other appropriate locations where such uses and facilities will not adversely affect existing uses and resources.

    c. In more remote locations, give preference to low-impact, small-scale facilities that are most supportive of primitive recreational uses.

  • Promote a range of recreational opportunities, including (a) major, intensive recreational facilities near organized areas or in new development centers determined to be appropriate, (b) less-intensive, nonexclusive recreational facilities in other areas, and (c) opportunities for primitive recreation without intrusion from more intensive forms of recreation.

  • Encourage intensive recreational facilities to locate or expand away from areas where there is a potential for conflict with existing uses, natural resources and other values of the jurisdiction.


Policies2
POLICIES recreational areas, including such areas around rivers and streams, trails, ponds and lakes, to protect their natural character for primitive recreational activities such as canoeing, hiking, fishing and nature study.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1997 Policies Proposed Policies

  • Consider traditional sporting camps as recreational and cultural resources, worthy of protection from incompatible development and land uses, and give special consideration to sporting camps in the Commission’s development standards and in its review of rezoning petitions and development proposals within the immediate vicinity of a sporting camp.

  • Discourage the conversion or expansion of sporting camps located in more remote locations to facilities or uses that are more intensive or less compatible with remote values.

  • Consider traditional sporting camps as recreational and cultural resources, worthy of protection from incompatible development and land uses, and give special consideration to sporting camps in the Commission’s development standards, particularly the replacement of nonconforming structures


Policies3
POLICIES recreational areas, including such areas around rivers and streams, trails, ponds and lakes, to protect their natural character for primitive recreational activities such as canoeing, hiking, fishing and nature study.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1997 Policies Proposed Policies

  • Support cooperative efforts that ensure continued public access across, and recreational use of, private lands.

  • Cooperate with other appropriate agencies in identifying those lakes where surface use conflicts can be minimized or avoided by establishing limits on the power or type of watercraft on such lakes.


Remaining tasks
REMAINING TASKS recreational areas, including such areas around rivers and streams, trails, ponds and lakes, to protect their natural character for primitive recreational activities such as canoeing, hiking, fishing and nature study.• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

  • Some reorganization may occur:

    • Language related to changing land ownership patterns may be relocated to Chapter 4, and cross-referenced here.

  • Some fact-checking is still needed:

    • Number of commercial sporting camps operating today

    • Amount, location and type of publicly owned lands held by DOC, DIFW, and federal government (including AT)

    • Possible legislative updates related to ATV issues


Presentation of preliminary draft recreational resources

Questions? Comments? recreational areas, including such areas around rivers and streams, trails, ponds and lakes, to protect their natural character for primitive recreational activities such as canoeing, hiking, fishing and nature study.

June follow-up discussion?