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Topical Interest Groups as Communities of Practice: Strategies for Building a Community of Practice. Facilitated by: PK12 Educational Evaluation TIG Evaluation 2011 Anaheim, CA. Agenda:. Purpose of the Think Tank Introductions Overview of what we learned from other TIGs

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Topical Interest Groups as Communities of Practice: Strategies for Building a Community of Practice


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topical interest groups as communities of practice strategies for building a community of practice

Topical Interest Groups as Communities of Practice: Strategies for Building a Community of Practice

Facilitated by:

PK12 Educational Evaluation TIG

Evaluation 2011

Anaheim, CA

agenda
Agenda:
  • Purpose of the Think Tank
  • Introductions
  • Overview of what we learned from other TIGs
  • Communities of Practice – Definitions / description
  • Small group discussion
  • Large group discussion
the thinking behind the think tank
The thinking behind the Think Tank
  • Grow our CoP to improve support for members
  • Become more visible & communicate more actively
    • Renewed mission, vision, values statement
    • Identified goals & action steps
    • Hosted week of AEA365
  • Build on Strengths/Insights from other TIG leaders and members
background the development of the think tank
Background –The development of the Think Tank
  • To learn from other TIGs’ experiences, we asked leaders what they do to support members
  • Reached out to 6 TIGs’ chairs and co-chairs
    • TIGs with relatively large number of members or TIGsformed around broad interest areas
objectives of the think tank
Objectives of the Think Tank
  • Think more broadly about TIG activities, membership & how it supports ourCoPs
  • Start thinking about action steps to support CoP s within our TIG
  • Support your TIGs & the AEA leadership
what we asked tig leaders
What we asked TIG leaders…
  • Do you have regular communication with your members? If so, how do you maintain communication?
  • What is your TIG leadership working structure to make decisions and implement them effectively? How actively do you work outside the proposal review process?
  • What would you say is a strength of your TIG?
  • Will you be hosting any AEA events (e.g., webinars) during this year? If so, how did you decide?
  • Is there anything you like to do differently this year?
what we learned
What we learned…
  • TIG activity varied in terms of communicating with members, leadership team structure, & how actively they engage with their community.
  • Committed membership and diversity is seen as the strength of the TIG.
  • The majority of TIG leaders wanted to try out new strategies at the conference.
  • All TIG leaders were open to the idea of increasing collaboration with our TIG and hosting events.
community of practice cop definition
Community of Practice (CoP): Definition
  • Groups of people who interact regularly to share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better.
  • Term coined by Etienne Wenger & Jean Lave (1991)
  • Growing concept in business, organizational design, government, education, professional associations, development projects, & civic life.
3 elements of cop
3 Elements of CoP
  • The domain: An identity defined by a shared domain of interest.
  • The community: Members engage in joint activities & discussions, help each other, share information, & build relationships that enable them to learn from each other.
  • The practice: Members are practitioners who develop shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems—shared practice.
what do cops look like
What do CoPs look like?

CoPs develop their practice through variety of activities:

  • Problem solving
    • "Can we work on this design and brainstorm some ideas; I’m stuck."
  • Requests for information
    • "Where can I find the code to connect to the server?"
  • Seeking experience
    • "Has anyone dealt with a customer in this situation?"
  • Reusing assets
    • "I have a proposal for a local area network I wrote for a client last year. I can send it to you and you can easily tweak it for this new client."
what do cops look like1
What do CoPs look like?
  • Coordination and synergy
    • "Can we combine our data for additional research?
  • Discussing developments
    • "What do you think of the new system? Does it really help?"
  • Documentation projects
    • "We have faced this problem five times now. Let us write it down once and for all."
  • Visits
    • "Can we come and see the after-school program you have evaluated as effective?
  • Mapping knowledge and identifying gaps
    • "Who knows what, and what are we missing? What other groups should we connect with?"
slide12

Social Learning

Network

Community

  • Connections among people to quickly solve problems, share knowledge, make connections.
  • Aims to optimize connectivity among people.
  • Shared identity around
  • topic or set of challenges.
  • Requires sustained identification & engagement.
  • Requires time & commitment.
  • Aims to develop the learning partnership around a common agenda for learning.
small group discussion
Small Group Discussion
  • How do we describe our TIGS that we participate in? Are they networks or communities?
  • Do we want to build strong networks or communities within our TIGs? Either way, what are some action steps that we can take in this next year?
  • How can we facilitate collaborations and communications across TIGs to facilitate Communities of practice?
whole group discussion
Whole Group Discussion
  • Report discussion points to the larger group
  • What are some action steps to achieve our discussion points?
  • What are some facilitators and challenges to achieve these action steps?