2017 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow in New Mexico - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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2017 Gathering of Nations Pow Wow in New Mexico

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  1. Pow wow gathering in New Mexico

  2. Women's Golden Age competitors take part in the evening Grand Entry on the second day. According to the organizers, "A pow wow is a gathering of Indian Nations in a common circle of friendship.

  3. Nine-year-old Anhinga Benally, who is a Navajo junior girls' jingle competitor, prepares to dance on the first night. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  4. Narciso Toledo, from Jemez, carries the Eagle Staff in the evening Grand Entry on the second day. Organizers say "a pow wow usually begins with a Grand Entry of the dancers.

  5. Dancers take part in the evening Grand Entry on the second day. Organizers explain: "The dance competition for women and men is broken down by age group and dance style.

  6. Women's Golden Age competitors take part in the evening Grand Entry on the second day. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  7. Monty Walters, a Navajo Northern traditional competitor, waits for the Grand Entry on the opening night. Men's fancy dancers can be recognized by the large double feather bustles worn on their backs.

  8. Dancers take part in the Grand Entry on the opening night. Northern traditional dancers are men that wear full feather bustles on their back that typically come from an eagle or some other bird of prey.

  9. Seven-year-old Kerri Martin, who is a Navajo junior girls' fancy competitor, dances on the second day. Women's fancy shawl dancers are typified by the elaborately beaded capes, moccasins, and leggings.

  10. Thirteen-year-old Nizhoni Stencil, who is Navajo, and twelve-year-old Tasia Pecos, who is Jemez, prepare for the Grand Entry on the opening night. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  11. Dylan Ashley, who is Oglala Lakota, gets his hair braided by his cousin Justina Bruns in preparation. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  12. Dylan Ashley, who is Oglala Lakota, prepares. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  13. Sierra Pete, a Navajo women's fancy shawl competitor, sews the final fringes on her shawl in the back of her car. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  14. Nine-year-old Darrian Archuleta (R), a Pueblo-Southern Ute junior boys' traditional dancer, prepares. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  15. Kaidon Draper, a Navajo teen boys' fancy competitor, takes part in the Grand Entry on the opening night. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  16. A dancer's regalia is hung on a fence before the second day. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  17. Seven-year-old Kelly Dee, who is Navajo Hopi, competes in junior girls' fancy shawl category on the second day of the 32nd Annual Taos Pueblo Pow Wow, a Native American dance competition and social gathering, in Taos, New Mexico, July 8, 2017.

  18. Teen boys' fancy competitors stand before the judges after dancing on the second day. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  19. Linda Sewell, a Lakota women's golden age competitor, takes part in the Grand Entry on the opening night. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  20. Dancers take part in the evening Grand Entry on the second day. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  21. Competitors take part in an inter-tribal dance. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  22. Dancers take part in the Grand Entry on the opening night. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  23. Dancers take part in the evening Grand Entry on the second day. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  24. A competitor waits for food. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

  25. Evelyn Martinez, a Taos Pueblo women's jingle competitor, takes part in the Grand Entry on the opening night. REUTERS/Brian Snyder