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  1. Your organization name/logo Dogs Proposed Animal Ordinance

  2. The New Ordinance Making a model ordinance: • Input from the National Animal Control Assoc. • Local animal services and veterinary expertise • Regional animal services expertise: city 1, city 2, city 3 • Citizen and volunteer (rescue) input and approval of neighborhood associations • Recommended animal ordinances of cities across the country • Research from national humane and veterinary organizations

  3. NACA Recommendations National Animal Control Association The most effective ordinances are those that are: Easy to read and understand—by Animal Control, the prosecutor, the judge, and the general public.

  4. NACA Recommendations continued • By failing to provide potable water. • By depriving it of proper nutrition. • By failing to provide medical care. • By failing to provide proper shelter. • By failing to provide room to exercise. For example… do not say it is unlawful to be cruel to an animal unless you add:

  5. Overview Significant updates to the animal ordinance include the following: • Definitions • Minimum Care Standards • Confinement Standards • Dangerous or Vicious Designation • Rabies/Quarantine

  6. Minimum Care Standards A serious omission from the previous ordinance. Dog guardians must, at a minimum, meet his/her dog’s basic need for: • Exercise • Shelter • Nutrition

  7. Confinement Extensive improvements to this section. • General (fences, control, etc.) • Legal access • Prohibition of fixed-point chaining • Electronic devices • Confinement during transportation • Penalties, failure to confine

  8. Quote John Mays, director of the National Animal Control Association “Little Rock has one of the worst situations in the country that I’ve seen of backyard dogs—chained and neglected, or roaming.”

  9. What do you mean by “chaining”? • Some people keep dogs continuously chained to a fixed object such as a tree. • Many dogs they live on chains all day, every day. • Why is chaining inhumane for dogs and dangerous for people?

  10. Why is chaining inhumane? Many dogs are chained 7 days a week, 24 hours a day.

  11. Why is chaining inhumane? Chains are often very heavy - some people use logging chains.

  12. Why is chaining inhumane? Padlocks are common, too.

  13. Why is chaining inhumane? Chained dogs often get tangled, keeping them from shelter, food, and water.

  14. Why is chaining inhumane? Some dogs live their entire lives on very short chains with little freedom to move.

  15. Why is chaining inhumane? Some dogs live their entire lives on very short chains with little freedom to move.

  16. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs have no protection from heat, rain, and cold.

  17. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs have no protection from heat, rain, and cold.

  18. Why is chaining inhumane? Other chained dogs have inadequate shelter.

  19. Why is chaining inhumane? Other chained dogs have inadequate shelter.

  20. Why is chaining inhumane? Chained dogs can’t seek better shelter.

  21. Why is chaining inhumane? Grass is usually beaten down by constant pacing, leaving hard-packed dirt and mud.

  22. Why is chaining inhumane? Chained dogs can get hung over fences and off decks, causing death. We know it’s hard to look at these photos. It hurts the dogs even more, which is why they need better laws to protect them.

  23. Why is chaining inhumane? Chains frequently become embedded, causing injury and infection. We know it’s hard to look at these photos. It hurts the dogs even more, which is why they need better laws to protect them.

  24. Why is chaining inhumane? Chains frequently become embedded, causing injury and infection. We know it’s hard to look at these photos. It hurts the dogs even more, which is why they need better laws to protect them.

  25. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs live in unhealthy, trashy surroundings infested with parasites.

  26. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs live in unhealthy, trashy surroundings infested with parasites.

  27. Why is chaining inhumane? • Chained dogs are vulnerable to roaming dogs. • Chained dogs are vulnerable to thieves. • Pit bulls often stolen for fighting • Smaller dogs stolen for pit bull bait • Some people collect free and stolen dogs and sell them to research labs or Class B research lab dealers Annabelle is a sweet dog who was chained near a busy street. Anyone could have taken her.

  28. Why is chaining inhumane? Chaining can be a sign of dog-fighting – a very cruel crime. These dogs were part of a fighting ring in North Carolina.

  29. Why is chaining inhumane? Chaining laws gives officers a tool to crack down on dog fighting without having to catch a fight in progress. This chained dog was part of a dog-fighting ring in Ohio.

  30. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs do not get enough food and water. Pedro died of starvation soon after this photo was taken.

  31. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs do not get enough food and water. Charlie’s owners moved away and he went a week without food. He was rescued.

  32. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs do not get enough food and water. How long has this bowl been empty?

  33. Why is chaining inhumane? Many chained dogs do not get enough food and water. These dogs were rescued from chains.

  34. Why is chaining dangerous to people? • Centers for Disease Control (CDC): • Chained dogs 2.8 times more likely to bite • Dogs most likely to bite are male, unneutered, and chained • Victims are most often children – small and weak targets

  35. American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA): Why is chaining dangerous to people? “Never tether or chain your dog because this can contribute to aggressive behavior.” United States Department Agriculture (USDA):“Continuous confinement of dogs by a tether is inhumane.” In 1997, USDA disallowed chaining as primary source of confinement under the U.S. Animal Welfare Act

  36. Why is chaining dangerous to people? • Chained dogs usually unsocialized, territorial, and prone to aggression. • “Fight or flight” instinct kicks in when threatened. Since can’t flee – forced to fight. • Attacks often occur when a child enters territory. • When an unsocialized dog breaks loose and roams, he is a danger to people. • Chained dogs are rarely vaccinated, presenting disease threat.

  37. Fatal Dog Attacks by Karen Delise • Chained dogs killed at least 109 people from 1965-2001: • 99 were children that wandered into reach of a chained dog • 11 attacks by dogs who broke free • Chained dogs are statistically more dangerous than free-running packs of dogs. .

  38. Children Killed by Chained Dogs Tony Evans, Jr., Age 3 Mississippi Pablo Hernandez, Age 5 Texas Abraham Jonathan Tackett, Age 2 Ft. Yukon, AlaskaZachary King, Age 7Minneapolis, MinnesotaKorie-Lyn Edwards, 17 mosMontague Township, Canada Tiffany Pauley, Age 5Atlanta, GAAmber Jones, Age 10TexasJonathan Martin, Age 2VirginiaAsia Turner, Age 4South CarolinaRobbie Shafer, Age 4VirginiaCody, Age 3British ColumbiaKamryn Billingsley, Age 1 MonthMississippi Myles Leakes, Age 4Florida Visit mothersagainstchaining.orgfor more info

  39. Children Attacked by Chained Dogs Alexander Lester, Age 12Pennsylvania, Elizabeth Stanek, Age 15North Carolina Alisia Johnson, Age 3Mississippi Kade Fries, Age 10Texas Jacob Brady, Age 16 mo.Virginia Malik Gipson, Age 9Illinois J'Naya Allen, Age 8Georgia Alex Miller, Age 7Tennessee Zachary Spafford, Age 8IndianaKassime Reddick, Age 9New Jersey Trinity Robichaud, Age 5South Carolina DeNasha Hackner, Age 9Indiana Maysia Moore, Age 8Washington Visit mothersagainstchaining.orgfor more info

  40. Chaining makes aggressive - not protective - dogs • Protective dog: Socialized by spending time with people. Can sense when human family is threatened. • Inside pets make the best guard dogs. • Most K9 officers keep their dogs inside the house, where they are part of the family. • Inside dogs are a very effective way to scare intruder. • Aggressive dog: Can't distinguish between family and threat. Likely to attack anyone. • Leaving a dog on a chain is how to raise an aggressive dog.

  41. Dogs shouldn’t be let loose, either! • Dogs should be socialized and kept: • Inside the home and • In a fenced yard • But you don't have to have a fence to have a dog! • Apartment-dwellers don’t even haveyards! But their dogs are happy living inside with regular walks • Many resources are available to help people train their dogs to be well-behaved family members

  42. Owning a dog is a responsibility! Dog owners must be able to provide basic needs: ExerciseFoodWaterShelter Dogs are living creatures—not objects to be tossed in the yard like a junked car

  43. Nutrition Minimum Care Standard 1)It shall be unlawful for any person keeping or harboring any dog to fail, refuse or neglect to provide such dog with clean, fresh potable water adequate for the dog’s size, age, and physical condition. This water supply shall be either free flowing or provided in a removable receptacle that is weighted and secured to prevent tipping. (2)It shall be unlawful for any person keeping or harboring any dog to fail, refuse or neglect to provide such dog with wholesome foodstuff suitable for the dog’s physical condition and age and in sufficient quantities to maintain an adequate level of nutrition for the dog.

  44. Exercise Minimum Care Standard (1) The enclosure or confinement area for a dog shall encompass sufficient useable space to keep the animal in good condition. (2) When a dog is confined by means of a tether and cable run, the trolley system shall be configured to allow access to the maximum available exercise area. (3) When a dog is confined outside by means of an enclosure or an electronic containment device, the following minimum space requirements shall be met: Size of Dog Pen (increase pen size by half of total area per additional dog) Extra Large (over 75 lbs) ** sq. feetLarge (50-75 lbs) **sq. feetMedium (20-50 lbs) **sq. feetSmall (under 20 lbs) **sq. feet

  45. Shelter Minimum Care Standard (1) Any dog that is habitually kept outside or repeatedly left outside unattended by an adult person shall be provided with a structurally sound, moisture-proof and windproof shelter large enough to keep the dog reasonably clean and dry. (2) A shelter which does not protect the dog from temperature extremes or precipitation, or which does not provide adequate ventilation or drainage, shall not comply with this section. (3) A dog’s shelter and bedding and other accessible space shall be maintained in a manner which minimizes the risk of the dog contracting disease, being injured or becoming infested with parasites.

  46. Fixed-point Chaining Prohibition: safer for the dog and the community. • Dogs are highly social pack animals. Guardians are encouraged to bring them into their homes. • If the dog is not going to be allowed inside, an adequate fence is the next best option. A fence will allow the dog freedom of movement and the ability to exercise. • If a fence is not possible, citizens are still responsible for the socialization and humane treatment of their dogs. An alternative to fixed-point chaining is a trolley (overhead run): • Very inexpensive. • Easy to install. • Provide more freedom of movement than a fixed chain, which alleviates some of the dog’s frustration and aggression.

  47. Fixed-point Chaining Prohibition: safer for the dog and the community. Chaining. Direct point chaining, or tethering of dogs to a stationary object, is prohibited. Dogs may be restrained by means of a trolley system, or a tether attached to a pulley on a cable run, if the following conditions are met: 1. Only one dog may be tethered to each cable run. 2. The tether must be attached to a properly fitting collar or harness worn by the dog, with enough room between the collar and the dog's throat through which two fingers may fit. Choke collars and pinch collars are prohibited for purposes of tethering a dog to a cable run. 3. There must be a swivel on at least one end of the tether to minimize tangling of the tether. 4. The tether and cable run must be of adequate size and strength to effectively restrain the dog. The size and weight of the tether must not be excessive, as determined by the Animal Services officer, considering the age, size and health of the dog. 5. The cable run must be at least (10) feet in length and mounted at least four (4) feet and no more than seven (7) feet above ground level. 6. The length of the tether from the cable run to the dog's collar should allow access to the maximum available exercise area and should allow continuous access to water and shelter. The trolley system must be of appropriate configuration to confine the dog to the owner's property, to prevent the tether from extending over and object or an edge that could result in injury or strangulation of the dog, and to prevent the tether from becoming tangled with other objects or animals

  48. Fixed-point Chaining Prohibition: safer for the dog and the community.

  49. Limited chain area…

  50. …expanded Trolley area