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Building Math in the classroom - Teaching Through Problem-Solving -. Day 2. NCTM’s view of problem solving. Problem solving means engaging in a task for which the solution method is not known in advance.

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Building Math in the classroom - Teaching Through Problem-Solving -


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    1. Building Math in the classroom- Teaching Through Problem-Solving - Day 2 Presentation is prepared for The Park City Mathematics Institute, Secondary School Teachers Program, July 9-July 20, 2007 by Akihiko Takahashi

    2. NCTM’s view of problem solving • Problem solving means engaging in a task for which the solution method is not known in advance. • Problem solving is an integral part of all mathematics learning, and so it should not be an isolated part of the mathematics program. • Choosing worthwhile problems and mathematical tasks • There are many, many problems that are interesting and fun but that may not lead to the development of the mathematical ideas that are important for a class at a particular time. Presentation is prepared for The Park City Mathematics Institute, Secondary School Teachers Program, July 9-July 20, 2007 by Akihiko Takahashi

    3. The Secret of The Crystal Ball • Chose any two digit number. • Add together both digits. • Subtract the total from your original number. • When you have the final number look it up on the chart and find the relevant symbol. • Concentrate on the symbol and when you have it clearly in your mind. • Click on the crystal ball to see the symbol. http://www.cbs.com/primetime/ghost_whisperer/crystal_ball.shtml Presentation is prepared for The Park City Mathematics Institute, Secondary School Teachers Program, July 9-July 20, 2007 by Akihiko Takahashi

    4. Curriculum & Textbook Students Problem Designing a lesson for teaching through problem solving Teaching through problem solving Presentation is prepared for The Park City Mathematics Institute, Secondary School Teachers Program, July 9-July 20, 2007 by Akihiko Takahashi

    5. How would you use this mathematical situation for your students?- Explore mathematics in this situation- Presentation is prepared for The Park City Mathematics Institute, Secondary School Teachers Program, July 9-July 20, 2007 by Akihiko Takahashi

    6. Task for each table-Wednesday and Thursday- • Short sketch of teaching through problem solving • Purpose of the problem solving (goal of the lesson) • What mathematics, beside developing problem solving skills, you would teach by using this situation? • Questioning • How would you pose the problem • What question(s) would you ask to your students to learn mathematics? • Beyond show and tell • Anticipate students’ responses to your questions that including misunderstandings to facilitate discussion • Briefly describe how would you facilitate discussion Presentation is prepared for The Park City Mathematics Institute, Secondary School Teachers Program, July 9-July 20, 2007 by Akihiko Takahashi