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Please sit in your assigned seats and quietly follow the directions below: 20 minutes of silent reading You may: Read silently Work on homework Complete your Key Words Art Assignment.

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slide1

Please sit in your assigned seats and quietly follow the directions below:

20 minutes of silent reading

You may:

Read silently

Work on homework

Complete your Key Words Art Assignment

slide2

USHC Standard 5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of domestic and foreign developments that contributed to the emergence of the United States as a world power in the twentieth century.

USHC 5.4: Analyze the causes and consequences of United States involvement in WWI, including the failure of neutrality and the reasons for the declaration of war, the role of propaganda in creating a unified war effort, the limitation of individual liberties, and Woodrow Wilson’s leadership in the Treaty of Versailles and the creation of the League of Nations.

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President Woodrow Wilson declared the U.S. neutral, in order to keep the country out of “Europe’s war”

• Many Americans took sides anyway

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Support for the Central Powers

• Many German Americans supported their homeland

• Many Irish Americans supported the Central Powers because they’d endured centuries of British rule in Ireland

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Support for the Allies

• In general, American public opinion favored the Allies

• Many Americans valued the heritage, language, and political ideals they shared with Great Britain

• American politicians, military leaders, and business men supported the Allies because of their strong ties politically and economically to the Allied powers

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There were several reasons for the U.S. entering WWI:

  • Investment in Allied Victory
  • Many American banks began to invest heavily in Allied victory
  • Some banks also invested in the Central Powers
  • Most foreign loans required the approval of the secretary of Treasury, who was strongly pro-British
  • If the Allies won, the money would be paid back; if not, the money might be lost forever
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2. The British Blockade

  • The United States was unable to send supplies and food to Germany, because the British navy set up a blockade to keep Germany from receiving supplies
  • The U.S. was therefore only sending supplies and food to Great Britain and the other Allies
  • The blockade also kept any news about the war from Germany from reaching the United States
  • War news that reached the U.S. was almost entirely British news
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3. German U-boats

  • Germany decided they needed to starve France and Great Britain out of the war, by cutting off the supplies and food coming from the United States
  • They sent U-boats, which are submarines, to sink without warning any ship they found in British waters
  • Americans were outraged by Germany’s stance
  • The British passenger liner Lusitania was sunk, killing 128 Americans on May 7,1915
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3. German U-boats

  • The French passenger ship Sussex was torpedoed, injuring several Americans on board, in March 1916
  • Germany signed the Sussex Pledge, agreeing, with certain conditions, to stop sinking merchant ships without warning
  • Woodrow Wilson was re-elected president, running of the slogan, “He kept us out of the war”
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4. The Zimmerman Telegram

  • In January 1917, German official Arthur Zimmerman telegraphed the German ambassador to Mexico, asking him to make Mexico an offer
  • Zimmerman proposed that Mexico side with Germany if the U.S. entered the war against Germany and the other Central Powers
  • Zimmerman promised Mexico that they would regain “lost territory in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona” after the war
  • British intelligence intercepted the Zimmerman telegram
  • Shortly after, the letter was leaked to American newspapers
  • Americans were outraged, and many concluded war with Germany was necessary
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On February 1, 1917 Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare, violating the Sussex Pledge

  • Between February 3 and March 21, German U-boats sank 6 American merchant ships without warning
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President Woodrow Wilson appeared before a special session of Congress on April 2, 1917 to ask for a declaration of war against Germany

  • The Senate passed the resolution on April 4
  • The House of Representatives passed the resolution on April 6, and President Wilson signed it