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Shh … . We’re Reading Silently. Transitioning from Oral to Silent Reading. Jane Hunt, Ed.D . Loyola University Chicago Jhunt2@luc.edu. A Life Skill: Reading aloud or silently?. Let’s Practice Begin with your yellow sheet. W hen I say “open it” begin reading. All read at the same time.

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shh we re reading silently transitioning from oral to silent reading

Shh…. We’re Reading Silently. Transitioning from Oral to Silent Reading.

Jane Hunt, Ed.D.

Loyola University Chicago

Jhunt2@luc.edu

a life skill reading aloud or silently
A Life Skill: Reading aloud or silently?

Let’s Practice

Begin with your yellow sheet.

When I say “open it” begin reading. All read at the same time.

Read aloud so that it sounds very good to everyone around you. Make sure you read loudly and clearly. Be expressive.

(From Rick Bayless’ Topolobampo Restaurant)

let s try something else
Let’s try something else….

Let’s Practice

This time with the blue sheet.

When I say “open it,” read what it says aloud. Everyone reads.

Read aloud so that it sounds very good to everyone around you. Make sure you read loudly and clearly. Be expressive.

(Cetinkaya, 2013)

life reading is silent reading
“Life Reading is Silent Reading.”

Huey (1908/1968)

“Research from this time confirmed the superiority of silent reading over oral reading in speed and comprehension, initiating the call for silent reading in schools.” (Pearson, Goodin, 2010)

Smith (1934) noted that between the years of 1918 and 1925 scientific investigations provided evidence that silent reading was superior over oral reading both in comprehension and speed.

relevant research findings
Relevant Research Findings

Time special education students spent reading silently predicted reading growth while time spent reading aloud did not. (Leinhardt, Zigmond, and Cooley, 1981).

The present emphasis and sporadic use of round robin reading in the secondary grades has produced a lack of direct practice of silent reading. Research evidence shows that the amount of time allocated to silent reading instruction is minuscule in the primary and intermediate grades. (Anderson, Hiebert, Scott & Wilkinson, 1985)

slide8
Common Silent Reading Research Topics

Motivation

Choice and control

Time

Classroom libraries

Accountability

Home and summer reading

questions for professional development research plcs
Questions for Professional Development/Research/PLCs

Are silent reading behaviors really silent?

What should be observed when students are reading to themselves with narrative and expository texts?

What do teachers need to do to develop silent reading behaviors and strategies?

(Wright, Sherman & Jones, 2010)

teaching silent reading as a life skill
Teaching Silent Reading as a life skill

Teaching silent reading as opposed to asking our students to read silently??

(So that they don’t disturb others and disrupt the classroom…

Unless they are in a guided reading group….when they might be reading a text chorally)

close reading and ccss ela as observed recently in several grade 3 6 classrooms
Close Reading and CCSS ELA(as observed recently in several grade 3- 6 classrooms)

Teacher reads passage first aloud to the students

Students read the passage three times

First time for the gist

Second time to read for main ideas and details

Third time to notice elements of author’s craft

Let’s consider this…………….

ask yourself
Ask yourself……..?

Who is doing the work?

Who needs to learn to read?

Who is doing the heavy lifting?

How heavy is the lifting?

slide14
Who Is?

Doing the teaching / coaching?

Doing the reading / thinking / responding?

engaged silent reading swan coddington guthrie 2010
Engaged Silent Reading (Swan, Coddington, Guthrie, 2010)

“Intrinsically motivated, strategic reading”

When reading is automatic and easy, it may not require high order systems of processing, such as reasoning or self-correcting. Conversely, when students read silently to extend their learning from text, they are reading for knowledge, which may require more strategic reading because extended reading requires reasoning, identifying key points, organizing information, and linking new information to prior knowledge to build deep, meaningful, conceptual knowledge. P. 96 (in Hiebert & Reutzel, 2010).

explicit and intentional teaching for silent reading
Explicit and intentional teaching for silent reading

Previewing – Previewing a text is a reading technique where the reader looks through an entire text/ book to see what it might be about, if it might be interesting prior to reading it/ if I can make any connections to my experiences.

Scanning- Scanning a text is a reading technique where the reader looks for specific information rather than trying to absorb all the information.

Skimming - Skimming is reading a text to get the gist, the basic overall idea, rather than concentrating on absorbing all the details.

silent reading think alouds
Silent Reading Think Alouds

Showing students what good readers do and how they “meet” a new text (rather than reading it to them the first time).

Previewing

Cover, book jacket, illustrations, photos, captions, title, headings, bolded print, paragraphs, sentences…

previewing the text
Previewing the text

Look at the photo

What does it tell us?

What is the title of this short text?

Can you make a connection to anything?

jane goodall scanning and skimming

Jane Goodall: Scanning and Skimming

Scan – Look over your text to see if you can find what one of her most important discoveries was regarding what chimpanzees are able to do.

Skim – Look at paragraphs one by one quickly to see what might be included in this text.

reading carefully and writing your own headings
Reading Carefully and Writing your own headings

Number each paragraph

Read the article carefully to get the main information from each paragraph.

I do, We do, You do

I do the first one

We do the second one together, but read silently.

With a partner, write a heading for the last two paragraphs.

headings
Headings

Help readers to recognize that headings are especially important for silent reading.

Try asking them to write their own: provide the title and one or two section headers and remove the rest.

consider vocabulary

Consider Vocabulary

Go back to the photo and with your partner jot down some words that you think could be in the article that goes with this.

some possibilities
Some Possibilities?

Winter Olympics

ski jumping

countries

practice

ramp

sport

dangerous

coach

downhill

Brave

Russia

gold, silver, bronze

practice with newsela
Practice with Newsela

Open and preview your article.

Skim your article to see what the purpose might have been for writing this article.

Scan your article to find out who won the gold medal.

Read the headings in the article.

Ask yourself an “I wonder….?” question about this article.

finding main ideas in texts
Finding Main Ideas in Texts

From Newsela.com articles

In the center write the topic:

In the ring around the center, list most important words

In the ring around it, write detail words

In the box at the bottom right the main idea in ten words or less. (Ten fingers)

Write a few sentences with all of these detail words, and you have a summary.

classroom practices
Classroom Practices

Silent reading during guided reading groups – Read short texts section by section.

Add to Daily Five – Read (silently) WITH someone

Whole class shared reading with differentiated texts on the same topic

Jigsawing texts so students can read silently independently and have a responsibility to contribute to the group’s gathering of knowledge

pre reading reader considerations
Pre-reading reader considerations

Help me recognize what I am reading about…..

Help me figure out what I might already know about this…..

Help me determine what words I might have trouble with that could derail me when I read this by myself…..

Help me recognize why I might want to read this…..

Help me determine what I will learn when I read this….

Help me identify what I might find confusing when I read…….

Help me to make inferences…..

using differentiated text for whole class lessons

Using differentiated text for whole class lessons

Newsela.com (begins at approximately 3rdgrade)

Readworks.org

workshop resources
Workshop Resources

Research

Cetinkaya, C. (2013). A Neglected Skill: Silent Reading Fluency. International Journal of Academic Research, 5(4),475 – 480.

Hiebert, E. H & Reutzel, D. R. (Eds.) (2010). Revisiting Silent Reading: New Directions for Teachers and Researchers. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Books and Websites

McDonnell, Patrick. (2011). Me…..Jane. New York: Little Brown and Company.

Ruurs, Margriet. ( 2005). My Librarian is a Camel: How Books Are Brought to Children Around the World. Honesdale, PA: Boyds Mills Press.