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Slides last updated: October 2013. There are two main types of lung cancer 1.

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there are two main types of lung cancer 1
There are two main types of lung cancer1
  • Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013, accessed on 15/09/2013.
nsclc can be further divided into different sub types 1
NSCLC can be further divided into different sub-types1

Large cell carcinoma

(2.6% of lung cancer)

Lung Cancer (100%)

Other NSCLC

(20.2% of lung cancer)

Squamous cell

carcinoma

(21.4% of lung cancer)

Adenocarcinoma

(40.1% of lung cancer)

NSCLC

(85.3% of lung cancer)

  • Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013, accessed on 15/09/2013.
nsclc adenocarcinoma
NSCLC: Adenocarcinoma

40.1%1

Adenocarcinoma

Adenocarcinoma lesions are usually peripherally located2

Most frequent in women and non-smokers2

Some patients have EGFR/ErbB1 mutations; these patients require a specific diagnosis and treatment approach3

1. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013, accessed on 15/09/2013. 2. Heighway J & Betticher DC. Atlas Genet Cytogenet Oncol Haematol. February 2004. 3. Vijayalakshmi R, et al. Indian J Surg Oncol 2011;2:178‒188.

nsclc squamous cell carcinoma
NSCLC: Squamous cell carcinoma

21.4%1

Squamous Cell Carcinoma2

Squamous Cell Carcinoma lesions are generally centrally located, near bronchi

Tends to spread locally

Closely correlated with smoking

1. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013, accessed on 15/09/2013. 2. Heighway J & Betticher DC. Atlas Genet Cytogenet Oncol Haematol. February 2004.

nsclc large cell carcinoma
NSCLC: Large cell carcinoma

2.6%1

Large Cell Carcinoma

Comprised of undifferentiated cells 2

Lesions are usually peripherally located but can occur anywhere 2

High tendency to metastasize2

1. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013, accessed on 15/09/2013. 2. Heighway J & Betticher DC. Atlas Genet Cytogenet Oncol Haematol. February 2004.

nsclc other
NSCLC: Other

20.2%1

Other, including Not Otherwise Specified (NOS) or Unknown

A classification of NOS or unknown is usually due to ineffective sampling and examination2

This classification is expected to decline in use due to more accurate biopsies and advances in immunohistochemistry and biomarker testing2

1. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. (eds). SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010, National Cancer Institute. Bethesda, MD, http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2010/, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013, accessed on 15/09/2013. 2. Righi L, Graziano P, Fornari A, et al. Cancer 2011;117:3416‒3423.