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Placard A. T.R. as a young boy.

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Placard A

T.R. as a young boy.

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Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. was born on October 27, 1858, in a four-story brownstone at 28 East 20th Street, in the modern-day Gramercy section of New York City to businessman/philanthropist Theodore "Thee" Roosevelt, Sr. and socialite Martha Stewart "Mittie" Bulloch. Roosevelt's youth was in large part shaped by his poor health and his need to overcome severe asthma, with debilitating impact on the body and the personality. He experienced recurring sudden nighttime asthma attacks that caused near death-like experiences of being smothered to death, terrifying the boy and his parents. Thee had a significant influence on him. Theodore Jr. later wrote: "My father, Theodore Roosevelt, was the best man I ever knew. He combined strength and courage with gentleness, tenderness, and great unselfishness. He would not tolerate in us children selfishness or cruelty, idleness, cowardice, or untruthfulness." PLACARD A

Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. was born on October 27, 1858, in a four-story brownstone at 28 East 20th Street, in the modern-day Gramercy section of New York City to businessman/philanthropist Theodore "Thee" Roosevelt, Sr. and socialite Martha Stewart "Mittie" Bulloch. Roosevelt's youth was in large part shaped by his poor health and his need to overcome severe asthma, with debilitating impact on the body and the personality. He experienced recurring sudden nighttime asthma attacks that caused near death-like experiences of being smothered to death, terrifying the boy and his parents. Thee had a significant influence on him. Theodore Jr. later wrote: "My father, Theodore Roosevelt, was the best man I ever knew. He combined strength and courage with gentleness, tenderness, and great unselfishness. He would not tolerate in us children selfishness or cruelty, idleness, cowardice, or untruthfulness." PLACARD A

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Placard B

Young T.R.’s taxidermy kit

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His lifelong interest in zoology began at age seven when he saw a dead seal at a local market - after obtaining the seal's head, Roosevelt and two cousins formed what they called the "Roosevelt Museum of Natural History". Having learned the rudiments of taxidermy, he filled his makeshift museum with animals that he killed or caught, then studied and prepared for display. At age nine, he codified his observation of insects with a paper entitled "The Natural History of Insects". PLACARD B

His lifelong interest in zoology began at age seven when he saw a dead seal at a local market - after obtaining the seal's head, Roosevelt and two cousins formed what they called the "Roosevelt Museum of Natural History". Having learned the rudiments of taxidermy, he filled his makeshift museum with animals that he killed or caught, then studied and prepared for display. At age nine, he codified his observation of insects with a paper entitled "The Natural History of Insects". PLACARD B

His lifelong interest in zoology began at age seven when he saw a dead seal at a local market - after obtaining the seal's head, Roosevelt and two cousins formed what they called the "Roosevelt Museum of Natural History". Having learned the rudiments of taxidermy, he filled his makeshift museum with animals that he killed or caught, then studied and prepared for display. At age nine, he codified his observation of insects with a paper entitled "The Natural History of Insects". PLACARD B

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Placard C

T.R.’s family trip hiking trip to the Alps had a lasting impression.

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Family trips abroad, including tours of Europe in 1869 and 1870, and Egypt in 1872, also had a lasting impact. Hiking with his family in the Alps in 1869, he found he could actually keep pace with his father. He had discovered the significant benefits of physical exertion to minimize his asthma and bolster his spirits. With encouragement from his father, he then began a heavy regime of exercise. After being manhandled by two older boys on a camping trip, a boxing coach was added, to strengthen a weakened body and psyche. PLACARD C

Family trips abroad, including tours of Europe in 1869 and 1870, and Egypt in 1872, also had a lasting impact. Hiking with his family in the Alps in 1869, he found he could actually keep pace with his father. He had discovered the significant benefits of physical exertion to minimize his asthma and bolster his spirits. With encouragement from his father, he then began a heavy regime of exercise. After being manhandled by two older boys on a camping trip, a boxing coach was added, to strengthen a weakened body and psyche. PLACARD C

Family trips abroad, including tours of Europe in 1869 and 1870, and Egypt in 1872, also had a lasting impact. Hiking with his family in the Alps in 1869, he found he could actually keep pace with his father. He had discovered the significant benefits of physical exertion to minimize his asthma and bolster his spirits. With encouragement from his father, he then began a heavy regime of exercise. After being manhandled by two older boys on a camping trip, a boxing coach was added, to strengthen a weakened body and psyche. PLACARD C

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Placard D

T.R. boxing photo – Harvard University

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He did well in science, philosophy, and rhetoric courses but continued to struggle in Latin and Greek. He studied biology intently and was already an accomplished naturalist and published ornithologist; he read prodigiously with an almost photographic memory. While at Harvard, Roosevelt was active in rowing and boxing; he was runner-up in a Harvard boxing tournament. Roosevelt graduated Phi Beta Kappa (22nd of 177) from Harvard with an A.B. magna cum laude in 1880. PLACARD D

He did well in science, philosophy, and rhetoric courses but continued to struggle in Latin and Greek. He studied biology intently and was already an accomplished naturalist and published ornithologist; he read prodigiously with an almost photographic memory. While at Harvard, Roosevelt was active in rowing and boxing; he was runner-up in a Harvard boxing tournament. Roosevelt graduated Phi Beta Kappa (22nd of 177) from Harvard with an A.B. magna cum laude in 1880. PLACARD D

He did well in science, philosophy, and rhetoric courses but continued to struggle in Latin and Greek. He studied biology intently and was already an accomplished naturalist and published ornithologist; he read prodigiously with an almost photographic memory. While at Harvard, Roosevelt was active in rowing and boxing; he was runner-up in a Harvard boxing tournament. Roosevelt graduated Phi Beta Kappa (22nd of 177) from Harvard with an A.B. magna cum laude in 1880. PLACARD D

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Placard E

T.R. writes “The Naval War of 1812” during his time at Columbia University Law School.

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He entered Columbia Law School, and was an able student, but found the law often a frustration of irrationality; he spent much of his time writing a book on the War of 1812. One modern naval historian wrote: "Roosevelt's study of the War of 1812 influenced all subsequent scholarship on the naval aspects of the War of 1812 and continues to be reprinted. More than a classic, it remains, after 120 years, a standard study of the war.“ Roosevelt summarized one of the primary morals of the war thus: "It must be but a poor spirited American whose veins do not tingle with pride when he reads of the cruises and fights of the sea-captains, and their grim prowess, which kept the old Yankee flag floating over the waters of the Atlantic for three years, in the teeth of the mightiest naval power the world has ever seen ...“ PLACARD E

He entered Columbia Law School, and was an able student, but found the law often a frustration of irrationality; he spent much of his time writing a book on the War of 1812. One modern naval historian wrote: "Roosevelt's study of the War of 1812 influenced all subsequent scholarship on the naval aspects of the War of 1812 and continues to be reprinted. More than a classic, it remains, after 120 years, a standard study of the war.“ Roosevelt summarized one of the primary morals of the war thus: "It must be but a poor spirited American whose veins do not tingle with pride when he reads of the cruises and fights of the sea-captains, and their grim prowess, which kept the old Yankee flag floating over the waters of the Atlantic for three years, in the teeth of the mightiest naval power the world has ever seen ...“ PLACARD E

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Placard F

T.R. journal entry

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On his 22nd birthday, Roosevelt married Alice Hathaway Lee, daughter of George Cabot Lee and Caroline Watts Haskell. They had one daughter, Alice Lee Roosevelt on February 12, 1884. Alice died two days after their daughter was born from an undiagnosed case of kidney failure (in those days called Bright's disease), which had been masked by the pregnancy. In his diary, Roosevelt wrote a large 'X' on the page and then, "The light has gone out of my life." His mother Mittie died of typhoid fever on the same day, at 3:00 am, some eleven hours earlier, in the same house. The distraught Roosevelt left baby Alice in the care of his sister Bamie in New York City while he took time to grieve; he assumed custody of his daughter when she was three. He also reacted by focusing on work, specifically re-energizing a legislative investigation into corruption in New York City with a concurrent bill to centralize power in the mayor's office. PLACARD F

On his 22nd birthday, Roosevelt married Alice Hathaway Lee, daughter of George Cabot Lee and Caroline Watts Haskell. They had one daughter, Alice Lee Roosevelt on February 12, 1884. Alice died two days after their daughter was born from an undiagnosed case of kidney failure (in those days called Bright's disease), which had been masked by the pregnancy. In his diary, Roosevelt wrote a large 'X' on the page and then, "The light has gone out of my life." His mother Mittie died of typhoid fever on the same day, at 3:00 am, some eleven hours earlier, in the same house. The distraught Roosevelt left baby Alice in the care of his sister Bamie in New York City while he took time to grieve; he assumed custody of his daughter when she was three. He also reacted by focusing on work, specifically re-energizing a legislative investigation into corruption in New York City with a concurrent bill to centralize power in the mayor's office. PLACARD F

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Placard G

Life as a rancher

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From 1884 to 1886 Roosevelt lived the rough life of a rancher in the Badlands of Dakota Territory.  Though the typical Easterner in some respects--with his fancy cowboy outfit, eyeglasses, books, clean language and hygiene--he soon gained the respect of the other ranchers.  Roosevelt spent entire days in the saddle and was physically transformed, developing a deep tan, broad shoulders, a powerful chest, and a purposeful walk.  The western experience also deepened his love of the great outdoors. PLACARD G

From 1884 to 1886 Roosevelt lived the rough life of a rancher in the Badlands of Dakota Territory.  Though the typical Easterner in some respects--with his fancy cowboy outfit, eyeglasses, books, clean language and hygiene--he soon gained the respect of the other ranchers.  Roosevelt spent entire days in the saddle and was physically transformed, developing a deep tan, broad shoulders, a powerful chest, and a purposeful walk.  The western experience also deepened his love of the great outdoors. PLACARD G

From 1884 to 1886 Roosevelt lived the rough life of a rancher in the Badlands of Dakota Territory.  Though the typical Easterner in some respects--with his fancy cowboy outfit, eyeglasses, books, clean language and hygiene--he soon gained the respect of the other ranchers.  Roosevelt spent entire days in the saddle and was physically transformed, developing a deep tan, broad shoulders, a powerful chest, and a purposeful walk.  The western experience also deepened his love of the great outdoors. PLACARD G

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Placard H

NYC Police Commissioner

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Roosevelt became president of the board of New York City Police Commissioners in 1895 for two years and radically reformed the police force. The New York Police Department (NYPD) was reputed as one of the most corrupt in America; the NYPD's history division records that Roosevelt was "an iron-willed leader of unimpeachable honesty, (who) brought a reforming zeal to the New York City Police Commission in 1895.“ Roosevelt and his fellow commissioners established new disciplinary rules, created a bicycle squad to enforce New York's traffic laws and standardized the use of .32 Colt Caliber pistols by officers. In Riis' autobiography, he described the effect of his book on the new police commissioner: When Roosevelt read [my] book..... No one ever helped as he did. For two years we were brothers in (New York City's crime-ridden) Mulberry Street. When he left I had seen its golden age.” PLACARD H

Roosevelt became president of the board of New York City Police Commissioners in 1895 for two years and radically reformed the police force. The New York Police Department (NYPD) was reputed as one of the most corrupt in America; the NYPD's history division records that Roosevelt was "an iron-willed leader of unimpeachable honesty, (who) brought a reforming zeal to the New York City Police Commission in 1895.“ Roosevelt and his fellow commissioners established new disciplinary rules, created a bicycle squad to enforce New York's traffic laws and standardized the use of .32 Colt Caliber pistols by officers. In Riis' autobiography, he described the effect of his book on the new police commissioner: When Roosevelt read [my] book..... No one ever helped as he did. For two years we were brothers in (New York City's crime-ridden) Mulberry Street. When he left I had seen its golden age.” PLACARD H

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Placard I

Lt. Colonel First U.S. Calvary

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Roosevelt campaigned for William McKinley in 1896, leading to a presidential appointment to the position of Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897. Roosevelt was instrumental in preparing the Navy for the Spanish–American War. Roosevelt had an analytical mind, even as he was itching for war. He explained his priorities to one of the Navy's planners in late 1897: "I would regard war with Spain from two viewpoints: first, the advisability on the grounds both of humanity and self-interest of interfering on behalf of the Cubans, and of taking one more step toward the complete freeing of America from European dominion; second, the benefit done our people by giving them something to think of which is not material gain, and especially the benefit done our military forces by trying both the Navy and Army in actual practice.“ In 1898 the U.S. went to war against Spain, and Roosevelt became a Lt. Colonel of the First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry. PLACARD I

Roosevelt campaigned for William McKinley in 1896, leading to a presidential appointment to the position of Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1897. Roosevelt was instrumental in preparing the Navy for the Spanish–American War. Roosevelt had an analytical mind, even as he was itching for war. He explained his priorities to one of the Navy's planners in late 1897: "I would regard war with Spain from two viewpoints: first, the advisability on the grounds both of humanity and self-interest of interfering on behalf of the Cubans, and of taking one more step toward the complete freeing of America from European dominion; second, the benefit done our people by giving them something to think of which is not material gain, and especially the benefit done our military forces by trying both the Navy and Army in actual practice.“ In 1898 the U.S. went to war against Spain, and Roosevelt became a Lt. Colonel of the First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry. PLACARD I

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Placard J

Rough Riders

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On July 1, 1898, Col. Roosevelt led the “Rough Riders” to victory in the Battle of San Juan Hill. Roosevelt was nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor (awarded posthumously 100 years later). Roosevelt commented on his role in the battles: "On the day of the big fight I had to ask my men to do a deed that European military writers consider utterly impossible of performance, that is, to attack over open ground an unshaken infantry armed with the best modern repeating rifles behind a formidable system of entrenchments. The only way to get them to do it in the way it had to be done was to lead them myself.“ PLACARD J

On July 1, 1898, Col. Roosevelt led the “Rough Riders” to victory in the Battle of San Juan Hill. Roosevelt was nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor (awarded posthumously 100 years later). Roosevelt commented on his role in the battles: "On the day of the big fight I had to ask my men to do a deed that European military writers consider utterly impossible of performance, that is, to attack over open ground an unshaken infantry armed with the best modern repeating rifles behind a formidable system of entrenchments. The only way to get them to do it in the way it had to be done was to lead them myself.“ PLACARD J

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Placard K

T.R. runs for Governor of N.Y.

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A “certified war hero,” Roosevelt was elected Governor of New York. Governor Roosevelt learned a great deal about current economic issues and political techniques that later proved valuable to his presidency. He was exposed to the problems of trusts, monopoly, labor relations, and conservation. He was then nominated to become McKinley’s vice president in 1900. The office of vice president was a powerless sinecure and did not suit Roosevelt's aggressive temperament. However campaigning for it played to his skills. Roosevelt threw himself into the campaign with his accustomed energy, crisscrossing the nation denouncing the radicalism of William Jennings Bryan in contrast to the heroism of the soldiers and sailors who fought and won the war against Spain. McKinley’s assassination in September 1901 made Roosevelt an accidental president. PLACARD K

A “certified war hero,” Roosevelt was elected Governor of New York. Governor Roosevelt learned a great deal about current economic issues and political techniques that later proved valuable to his presidency. He was exposed to the problems of trusts, monopoly, labor relations, and conservation. He was then nominated to become McKinley’s vice president in 1900. The office of vice president was a powerless sinecure and did not suit Roosevelt's aggressive temperament. However campaigning for it played to his skills. Roosevelt threw himself into the campaign with his accustomed energy, crisscrossing the nation denouncing the radicalism of William Jennings Bryan in contrast to the heroism of the soldiers and sailors who fought and won the war against Spain. McKinley’s assassination in September 1901 made Roosevelt an accidental president. PLACARD K

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Placard L

Big Stick Diplomacy

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Big Stick ideology, Big Stick diplomacy, or Big Stick policy refers to U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt’s foreign policy: "speak softly, and carry a big stick." Roosevelt attributed the term to a West African proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.” The theory is that leaders strive for peace while also keeping other nations aware of its military power. Roosevelt first used the phrase in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair on September 2, 1901, four days before the assassination of President William McKinley who died eight days later, which subsequently thrust Roosevelt into the presidency. PLACARD L

Big Stick ideology, Big Stick diplomacy, or Big Stick policy refers to U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt’s foreign policy: "speak softly, and carry a big stick." Roosevelt attributed the term to a West African proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.” The theory is that leaders strive for peace while also keeping other nations aware of its military power. Roosevelt first used the phrase in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair on September 2, 1901, four days before the assassination of President William McKinley who died eight days later, which subsequently thrust Roosevelt into the presidency. PLACARD L

Big Stick ideology, Big Stick diplomacy, or Big Stick policy refers to U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt’s foreign policy: "speak softly, and carry a big stick." Roosevelt attributed the term to a West African proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.” The theory is that leaders strive for peace while also keeping other nations aware of its military power. Roosevelt first used the phrase in a speech at the Minnesota State Fair on September 2, 1901, four days before the assassination of President William McKinley who died eight days later, which subsequently thrust Roosevelt into the presidency. PLACARD L

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Placard M

Trustbuster

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The Good, the Bad, and the Bully: This was the core of Theodore Roosevelt's leadership. He boiled everything down to a case of right versus wrong and good versus bad. If a trust controlled an entire industry but provided good service at reasonable rates, it was a "good" trust to be left alone. Only the "bad" trusts that jacked up rates and exploited consumers would come under attack. Who would decide the difference between right and wrong? The occupant of the White House trusted only himself to make this decision in the interests of the people. The American public cheered Roosevelt's new offensive. The Supreme Court, in a narrow 5 to 4 decision, agreed and dissolved the Northern Securities Company. Roosevelt said confidently that no man, no matter how powerful, was above the law. As he landed blows on other "bad" trusts, his popularity grew and grew. PLACARD M

The Good, the Bad, and the Bully: This was the core of Theodore Roosevelt's leadership. He boiled everything down to a case of right versus wrong and good versus bad. If a trust controlled an entire industry but provided good service at reasonable rates, it was a "good" trust to be left alone. Only the "bad" trusts that jacked up rates and exploited consumers would come under attack. Who would decide the difference between right and wrong? The occupant of the White House trusted only himself to make this decision in the interests of the people. The American public cheered Roosevelt's new offensive. The Supreme Court, in a narrow 5 to 4 decision, agreed and dissolved the Northern Securities Company. Roosevelt said confidently that no man, no matter how powerful, was above the law. As he landed blows on other "bad" trusts, his popularity grew and grew. PLACARD M

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Placard N

The Roosevelt Corollary

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The Roosevelt Corollary is a corollary to the Monroe Doctrine that was articulated by President Theodore Roosevelt in his State of the Union Address in 1904 after the Venezuela Crisis of 1902–03. The corollary states that the United States will intervene in conflicts between European countries and Latin American countries to enforce legitimate claims of the European powers, rather than having the Europeans press their claims directly. PLACARD N

The Roosevelt Corollary is a corollary to the Monroe Doctrine that was articulated by President Theodore Roosevelt in his State of the Union Address in 1904 after the Venezuela Crisis of 1902–03. The corollary states that the United States will intervene in conflicts between European countries and Latin American countries to enforce legitimate claims of the European powers, rather than having the Europeans press their claims directly. PLACARD N

The Roosevelt Corollary is a corollary to the Monroe Doctrine that was articulated by President Theodore Roosevelt in his State of the Union Address in 1904 after the Venezuela Crisis of 1902–03. The corollary states that the United States will intervene in conflicts between European countries and Latin American countries to enforce legitimate claims of the European powers, rather than having the Europeans press their claims directly. PLACARD N

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Placard O

Smithsonian – Roosevelt African Expedition

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In March 1909, shortly after the end of his presidency, Roosevelt left New York for the Smithsonian-Roosevelt African Expedition, a safari in east and central Africa outfitted by the Smithsonian Institution. Roosevelt's party landed in Mombasa, British East Africa (now Kenya), traveled to the Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of the Congo) before following the Nile to Khartoum in modern Sudan. Financed by Andrew Carnegie and by his own proposed writings, Roosevelt's party hunted for specimens for the Smithsonian Institution and for the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Roosevelt and his companions killed or trapped approximately 11,400 animals, from insects and moles to hippopotamuses and elephants. PLACARD O

In March 1909, shortly after the end of his presidency, Roosevelt left New York for the Smithsonian-Roosevelt African Expedition, a safari in east and central Africa outfitted by the Smithsonian Institution. Roosevelt's party landed in Mombasa, British East Africa (now Kenya), traveled to the Belgian Congo (now Democratic Republic of the Congo) before following the Nile to Khartoum in modern Sudan. Financed by Andrew Carnegie and by his own proposed writings, Roosevelt's party hunted for specimens for the Smithsonian Institution and for the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Roosevelt and his companions killed or trapped approximately 11,400 animals, from insects and moles to hippopotamuses and elephants. PLACARD O

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Placard P

Election of 1912 – formation of the Bull Moose Party

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In 1912 Roosevelt came out of retirement to challenge President Taft for the Republican nomination. TR won most of the primaries but was denied the nomination; so he ran as the Progressive “Bull Moose” candidate. Roosevelt, however, failed to move enough Republicans in his direction. He did win 4.1 million votes (27%), compared to Taft's 3.5 million (23%). However, Wilson's 6.3 million votes (42%) were enough to garner 435 electoral votes. Roosevelt had 88 electoral votes to Taft's 8 electoral votes. But Pennsylvania was Roosevelt's only eastern state; in the Midwest, he carried Michigan, Minnesota, and South Dakota; in the West, California, and Washington; he did not win any southern states. PLACARD P

In 1912 Roosevelt came out of retirement to challenge President Taft for the Republican nomination. TR won most of the primaries but was denied the nomination; so he ran as the Progressive “Bull Moose” candidate. Roosevelt, however, failed to move enough Republicans in his direction. He did win 4.1 million votes (27%), compared to Taft's 3.5 million (23%). However, Wilson's 6.3 million votes (42%) were enough to garner 435 electoral votes. Roosevelt had 88 electoral votes to Taft's 8 electoral votes. But Pennsylvania was Roosevelt's only eastern state; in the Midwest, he carried Michigan, Minnesota, and South Dakota; in the West, California, and Washington; he did not win any southern states. PLACARD P

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Placard Q

T.R. assassination attempt

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While Roosevelt was campaigning in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1912, a saloonkeeper named John FlammangSchrank shot him, but the bullet lodged in his chest only after penetrating his steel eyeglass case and passing through a thick (50 pages) single-folded copy of the speech he was carrying in his jacket. Roosevelt, as an experienced hunter and anatomist, correctly concluded that since he was not coughing blood, the bullet had not completely penetrated the chest wall to his lung, and so declined suggestions he go to the hospital immediately. Instead, he delivered his scheduled speech with blood seeping into his shirt. He spoke for 90 minutes. His opening comments to the gathered crowd were, "Ladies and gentlemen, I don't know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose.“ Afterwards, probes and x-ray showed that the bullet had traversed three inches (76 mm) of tissue and lodged in Roosevelt's chest muscle but did not penetrate the pleura, and it would be more dangerous to attempt to remove the bullet than to leave it in place. Roosevelt carried it with him for the rest of his life. PLACARD Q

While Roosevelt was campaigning in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on October 14, 1912, a saloonkeeper named John FlammangSchrank shot him, but the bullet lodged in his chest only after penetrating his steel eyeglass case and passing through a thick (50 pages) single-folded copy of the speech he was carrying in his jacket. Roosevelt, as an experienced hunter and anatomist, correctly concluded that since he was not coughing blood, the bullet had not completely penetrated the chest wall to his lung, and so declined suggestions he go to the hospital immediately. Instead, he delivered his scheduled speech with blood seeping into his shirt. He spoke for 90 minutes. His opening comments to the gathered crowd were, "Ladies and gentlemen, I don't know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose.“ Afterwards, probes and x-ray showed that the bullet had traversed three inches (76 mm) of tissue and lodged in Roosevelt's chest muscle but did not penetrate the pleura, and it would be more dangerous to attempt to remove the bullet than to leave it in place. Roosevelt carried it with him for the rest of his life. PLACARD Q

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Placard R

January 6, 1919

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On January 6, 1919, Roosevelt died unexpectedly in his sleep at Sagamore Hill (his home in Cove Neck, NY) from a blood clot detaching itself from a vein and entering his lungs. Upon receiving word of his death, his son Archie telegraphed his siblings simply, "The old lion is dead.“ Woodrow Wilson's vice president, Thomas R. Marshall, said that "Death had to take Roosevelt sleeping, for if he had been awake, there would have been a fight.“ In addition to sisters Corinne and Bamie and his wife Edith, Theodore was survived by five children and eight grandchildren at the time of his death. PLACARD R

On January 6, 1919, Roosevelt died unexpectedly in his sleep at Sagamore Hill (his home in Cove Neck, NY) from a blood clot detaching itself from a vein and entering his lungs. Upon receiving word of his death, his son Archie telegraphed his siblings simply, "The old lion is dead.“ Woodrow Wilson's vice president, Thomas R. Marshall, said that "Death had to take Roosevelt sleeping, for if he had been awake, there would have been a fight.“ In addition to sisters Corinne and Bamie and his wife Edith, Theodore was survived by five children and eight grandchildren at the time of his death. PLACARD R

On January 6, 1919, Roosevelt died unexpectedly in his sleep at Sagamore Hill (his home in Cove Neck, NY) from a blood clot detaching itself from a vein and entering his lungs. Upon receiving word of his death, his son Archie telegraphed his siblings simply, "The old lion is dead.“ Woodrow Wilson's vice president, Thomas R. Marshall, said that "Death had to take Roosevelt sleeping, for if he had been awake, there would have been a fight.“ In addition to sisters Corinne and Bamie and his wife Edith, Theodore was survived by five children and eight grandchildren at the time of his death. PLACARD R