chapter five
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
CHAPTER FIVE

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 15

CHAPTER FIVE - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 109 Views
  • Uploaded on

CHAPTER FIVE. Cognitive Development. CASE STUDY: LUPITA. Why might Ms. Padilla initially underestimate Lupita’s academic potential? What clues suggest that Lupita is, in fact, quite bright?. CLUES THAT LUPITA IS A BRIGHT STUDENT. She completes assignments quickly.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'CHAPTER FIVE' - kylene


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
chapter five

CHAPTER FIVE

Cognitive Development

case study lupita
CASE STUDY: LUPITA
  • Why might Ms. Padilla initially underestimate Lupita’s academic potential?
  • What clues suggest that Lupita is, in fact, quite bright?
clues that lupita is a bright student
CLUES THAT LUPITA IS A BRIGHT STUDENT
  • She completes assignments quickly.
  • She has facility with puzzles.
  • She correctly interprets the aide’s subtle message.
  • She is skillful in guiding her peers.
early developmental theorists
EARLY DEVELOPMENTAL THEORISTS
  • Jean Piaget observed that children have self-constructed understanding of physical and social phenomena that change in quantitative ways over time.
  • Lev Vygotsky proposed mechanisms through which children’s social and cultural environments influence their development, and his work provided the groundwork for sociocultural theory.
general principles development
GENERAL PRINCIPLES: Development
  • The sequence of development is somewhat predictable.
  • Children develop at different rates.
  • Development is often marked by spurts and plateaus.
  • Development involves both quantitative and qualitative changes.
  • Heredity and environment interact in their effects on development.
  • Formal schooling promotes development.
  • Children’s own behaviors influence their development.
general principles developmental processes
GENERAL PRINCIPLES:Developmental Processes
  • The brain continues to develop throughout childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.
  • Children have a natural tendency to organize their experience.
  • Children are naturally inclined to make sense of and adapt to their environment.
  • Development builds on prior acquisitions.
general principles factors that promote development
GENERAL PRINCIPLES:Factors That Promote Development
  • Interactions with, as well as observations of, the physical environment promote development.
  • Language development facilitates cognitive development.
  • Interactions with other people promote development.
  • Inconsistencies between existing understandings and external events promote development.
  • Challenging tasks promote development.
trends in cognitive development
TRENDS IN COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
  • Children’s growing working memory capacity enables them to handle increasingly complex cognitive tasks.
  • Children’s growing knowledge base enhances their ability to learn new things.
  • Children’s knowledge, beliefs, and thinking processes become increasingly integrated.
  • Thinking becomes increasingly logical during elementary years.
  • Thinking becomes increasingly abstract in middle and secondary years.
more trends in cognitive development
MORE TRENDS IN COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
  • Several logical thinking processes important for mathematical and scientific reasoning improve considerably in adolescence.
  • Children think more logically and abstractly about tasks and topics they know well.
  • True expertise comes only after many years of study and practice.
  • To some extent, different cultures encourage different reasoning skills.
components of intelligence
COMPONENTS OF INTELLIGENCE
  • It is adaptive.
  • It is related to learning ability.
  • It involves the use of prior knowledge.
  • It involves interaction and coordination of many different thinking and reasoning processes.
  • It is culture-specific.
general principles intelligence
GENERAL PRINCIPLES:Intelligence
  • Intelligence can be measured only imprecisely.
  • Intelligence reflects general speed and efficiency of cognitive processing.
  • Intelligence involves numerous specific processes and abilities.
  • Learners may be more intelligent in some domains than in others.
  • Intelligence is a product of both heredity and environment.
  • Cognitive styles and dispositions predispose learners to think and act in more- or less-intelligent ways.
  • Learners act more intelligently with physical, symbolic, or social support.
addressing students developmental needs
ADDRESSING STUDENTS’ DEVELOPMENTAL NEEDS
  • Accommodating developmental differences and diversity in the classroom
  • Fostering cognitive development in all children and adolescents
recommendations accommodating developmental differences and diversity
RECOMMENDATIONS:Accommodating Developmental Differences and Diversity
  • Explore students’ reasoning with problem-solving tasks and probing questions.
  • Interpret intelligence test results cautiously.
  • Look for signs of exceptional abilities and talents.
  • Consult with specialists if children show significant delays in development.
recommendations fostering cognitive development in all children
RECOMMENDATIONS:Fostering Cognitive Development in All Children
  • Encourage play activities.
  • Share the wisdom of previous generations.
  • Rely on concrete objects and activities, especially in the early elementary years.
  • Present abstract ideas more frequently in middle school and high school grades, but tie them to concrete objects and events.
more recommendations fostering cognitive development
MORE RECOMMENDATIONS:Fostering Cognitive Development
  • Introduce sophisticated reasoning processes within the context of familiar situations and group work.
  • Scaffold students’ early efforts at challenging tasks and assignments.
  • Involve students in age-appropriate ways in adult activities.
  • Provide guidance and support so that all students can perform more intelligently.
ad