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Successfully Working on the Indian Reservation: Guidance for Non-Indians (based on experiences with the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation) Marilyn Smith, Kyle Prior, Zanetta Hanks, & Naomi Mason. CYFAR Program Showcase

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Successfully Working on the Indian Reservation: Guidance for Non-Indians (based on experiences with the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation)Marilyn Smith, Kyle Prior, Zanetta Hanks, & Naomi Mason

CYFAR Program Showcase

Topics to help non-Indians understand the cultural and historical

perspectives important to consider when working on the reservation.

Tribal Sovereignty:

When Cooperative Extension considered a CYFAR grant partnership with the tribe,

several important steps were taken to honor tribal sovereignty:

  • Met with agencies & organizations to get support and buy-in
  • Visited with key community leaders
  • Worked with key leaders to develop draft memorandum of agreement (MOA)
  • Met with administrative council to review and revise draft MOA
  • Requested time on the Governing Council meeting agenda to discuss project and MOA
  • Chair signed MOA and forwarded to University officials for signature. Renewed annually.

MOA available from the authors………

Governing Council:

Elected body made up of 7 elected representatives. The chair is responsible for the day-to-day operation of tribal business.

Council meets monthly. Administrative council (7 elected representatives) meet every Monday morning to follow-up on actions and/or planning for the future.

Tribal Law & Jurisdiction

Established by Executive Order in 1877 creating a 289,000 acre reservation. Updated Children’s Code passed in 2003 establishing a juvenile justice system.

Outdated Drug and Alcohol Stereotypes: The Truth Is…

SAMHSA's National Survey on Drug Use and Health (2002 & 2003). This study examines three categories of risk factors for substance use (individual/peers, family, and school). These risk factors were compared between American Indian or Alaska Native youth and other racial and ethnic groups. These estimates are based on 46,310 respondents aged 12 to 17, representing a national population of 25 million youth. Nationally, there are an estimated 183,000 American Indian or Alaska Native youths aged 12 to 17. Results of that survey indicate:

  • American Indian or Alaska Native youths were more likely than other youths to perceive moderate to no risk associated with substance use, to perceive their parents as not strongly disapproving of their substance use, and to believe that all or most of the students in their school get drunk at least once a week.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native youths were less likely than other youths to participate in youth activities.
  • According to American Indian or Alaska Native youths, their parents were about as likely as those of other youths to talk to their child about dangers of substance use, to let the youth know they had done a good job, to tell their youth that they were proud of something they had done, to make their youth do chores around the house or to limit the amount of time watching TV. However, parents of American Indian or Alaska Native youths were less likely to provide help with school homework or to limit the time out with friends on school nights.

The reservation is 415 sq. miles and is located on the

Nevada/Idaho border – 100 miles north of Elko, NV and

100 miles south of Mtn. Home, ID. Tribal Enrollment is 1,818.

Duck Valley Indian Reservation

Project MAGIC Graduates (2000-2005)

MAGIC: Making A Group and Individual Commitment

Court Ordered Juvenile Offenders.

Comparison of results before and after the program.

All numbers shown in percentages.