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Poetry’s musical devices:. Alliteration Assonance Onomatopoeia Rhyme Rhythm . Alliteration- repetition of an initial consonant sound. “ W hen I w atch you you w et brown bag of a w oman” (“Miss Rosie” by Lucille Clifton) .

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poetry s musical devices

Poetry’s musical devices:

Alliteration Assonance Onomatopoeia

Rhyme Rhythm

alliteration repetition of an initial consonant sound
Alliteration- repetition of an initial consonant sound.
  • “When I watch you

you wet brown bag of a woman”

(“Miss Rosie” by Lucille Clifton)

slide3
Assonance- repetition of similar vowel sounds (followed by different consonants) in words that are close together.
  • “And so all the night tide, I lie down by the side,

Of my darling, my darling, my life and my bride”

(“Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allen Poe)

slide5
Rhyme- pattern of accented vowel sounds and all sounds following them in words that are close together.
  • End rhyme- when rhyming words occur at the end of lines.

“Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village, though;

(“Stopping by Woods on a Snowy

Evening” by Robert Frost)

slide6

Internal rhyme is rhyme that occurs within the line of the poem.

“The warm sun is falling, the bleak wind is wailing.

The bare boughs are sighing, the pale flowers are dying…”

(“Autumn: A Dirge” Percy Byshhe Shelley)

rhyme scheme the pattern of rhymed lines in a poem
Rhyme scheme- the pattern of rhymed lines in a poem.
  • “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? a

Thou are more lovely and more temperate b

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, a

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date. b

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, c

And often in his gold complexion dimmed; d

And every fair from fair sometime declines, c

By chance, or nature’s changing course, untrimmed; d

(“Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day” Shakespeare)

rhythm the musical quality in language produced by repetition
Rhythm- the musical quality in language produced by repetition.
  • Poems written in meter create rhythm by a strict pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables.

(p. 554-5)

free verse is poetry that does not have a regular meter or rhyme scheme
Free Verse is poetry that does not have a regular meter or rhyme scheme.
  • Free verse poems rely on other musical devices such as alliteration, internal rhyme, onomatopoeia to make them poetic.