retirement planning it s never too soon or too late to start n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Retirement Planning: It ’ s Never Too Soon – or Too Late – to Start PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Retirement Planning: It ’ s Never Too Soon – or Too Late – to Start

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 21

Retirement Planning: It ’ s Never Too Soon – or Too Late – to Start - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 96 Views
  • Uploaded on

Retirement Planning: It ’ s Never Too Soon – or Too Late – to Start. Today We Will Help You :. Examine “ retirement. ” Determine your goal. Learn about investment tools. Develop an investment strategy to better pursue your goal. Retirement:. Then and Now. Then.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Retirement Planning: It ’ s Never Too Soon – or Too Late – to Start


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Retirement Planning: It’s Never Too Soon – or Too Late – to Start AFN5600

    2. Today We Will Help You: • Examine “retirement.” • Determine your goal. • Learn about investment tools. • Develop an investment strategy to better pursue your goal.

    3. Retirement: Then and Now

    4. Then ... • Job longevity meant retirement security. • On average, people had shorter life expectancies. • That may have meant lower health care costs and lower retirement income needs.

    5. Now ... • Changing jobs is more common. • Medicare and Social Security have an uncertain future. • Health care and long-term care cost more. • People live longer.

    6. Your Hopes and Dreams for Retirement • Retirement is closer than you think. • What’s on your wish list? Perhaps travel, a vacation home, or education? • Your desired lifestyle will determine your income need.

    7. Consider the Inflation Factor Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics. Inflation is measured by the annual change in the Consumer Price Index.

    8. How Much Is Enough? Experts say you may need 60% to 80% of your final working year’s salary each year during retirement.

    9. Average Annual Social Security Benefits $24,576 $15,132 Retired Workers Retired Couples Source: Social Security Administration, Fact Sheet, Social Security, 2013 Changes, October 2012.

    10. How Do You Pursue Your Goal? • Use tax-advantaged accounts. • Invest, invest, invest.

    11. Use Tax-Advantaged Accounts • 401(k) Plans • IRAs

    12. Invest! Invest! Invest! • A strategy is key. • Complete worksheets.

    13. There Are Three Basic Asset Classes Stocks average annual return: 10.81%* Bonds average annual return: 8.10%* Money Market Instruments average annual return: 4.48%* High Stocks Bonds Risk/ReturnPotential Money Market Instruments Low *Sources: Standard & Poor’s; the Federal Reserve. Stocks are represented by Standard & Poor’s Composite Index of 500 stocks, an unmanaged index generally considered representative of the large-cap U.S. stock market. Results include reinvestment of dividends and other investment income. Bonds are represented by Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index. Money market instruments are represented by Barclays 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. Results are for the 30-year period ended December 31, 2012. The performance of any index is not indicative of the performance of a particular investment and does not take into account the effects of inflation or the fees and expenses associated with investing. Past performance cannot guarantee future results. Individuals cannot invest directly in any index.

    14. Understand Your Risk Tolerance • Realize your time horizon. • The longer the time frame, the more aggressive you may want to be.

    15. Conservative Mix Conservative Bonds Average Annual Rate of Return — 8.45%* 20% money market instruments, 50% bonds, 30% stocks 50% Stocks 30% 20% Money Market Instruments Past performance cannot guarantee future results. *All figures represent performance for the 30-year period ended December 31, 2012. Stocks are represented by the annual total returns of the S&P 500, bonds are represented by the Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, and money market instruments are represented by the Barclays 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. This illustration is not intended to represent the past or future performance of any specific investment. Asset allocation does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss.

    16. Moderate Mix Moderate Stocks Average Annual Rate of Return — 9.66%* 10% money market instruments, 30% bonds, 60% stocks 60% 30% 10% Bonds Money Market Instruments Past performance cannot guarantee future results. *All figures represent performance for the 30-year period ended December 31, 2012. Stocks are represented by the annual total returns of the S&P 500, bonds are represented by the Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, and money market instruments are represented by the Barclays 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. This illustration is not intended to represent the past or future performance of any specific investment. Asset allocation does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss.

    17. Aggressive Mix Aggressive Average Annual Rate of Return — 10.10%* 10% money market instruments, 10% bonds, 80% stocks Money Market Instruments 10% Stocks 80% 10% Bonds Past performance cannot guarantee future results. *All figures represent performance for the 30-year period ended December 31, 2012. Stocks are represented by the annual total returns of the S&P 500, bonds are represented by Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, and money market instruments are represented by Barclays 3-Month Treasury Bill Index. This illustration is not intended to represent the past or future performance of any specific investment. Asset allocation does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss.

    18. Your Current Savings • How much have you alreadysaved? • How much might it beworth?

    19. Your Monthly Savings Goal • Is it too high? • Consider adjusting your investment mix.

    20. Retirement Planning

    21. Questions and Answers Investment options are offered through a group variable annuity contract (Forms 902-GAQC-09 or 902-GAQC-09(CT) or 902-GAQC-09(OR)) underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company for contracts issued in all states except New York. United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Omaha, NE 68175 is licensed nationwide except in New York. Companion Life Insurance Company, Hauppauge, NY 11788 is licensed in New York and underwrites the group variable annuity (Form 900-GAQC-07(NY)). Each company accepts full responsibility for each of their respective contractual obligations under the contract but does not guarantee any contributions or investment returns except as to the Guaranteed Account and the Lifetime Guaranteed Income Account as provided under the contract. Neither United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Companion Life Insurance Company, nor their representatives or affiliates offers investment advice in connection with the contract. Specific features of the Lifetime Guaranteed Income Account (Rider Forms 651-GAQR-10 or 651-GAQR-10(CT) or 651-GAQR-10(OR)) vary by state. Restrictions apply. The Lifetime Guaranteed Income Account is not available in Nevada or New York. Group variable annuities are long-term investment vehicles designed to accumulate money on a tax-deferred basis for retirement purposes. Distributions may be subject to ordinary income tax and, if taken prior to age 59½, a 10 percent federal tax penalty may apply. Investing in a group variable annuity involves risk, including possible loss of principal. Prior to selecting investment options for your retirement account, you should consider the investment objectives, risks, fees and expenses of each option carefully. For this and other important information, you should review your enrollment materials or the participant website. Read this information carefully.