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Hydraulic Nanomanipulator. P13375. Table of Contents & Agenda. Introductions. Customer Dr. Schrlau Team David Anderson Ryan Dunn Bryon Elston Elizabeth Fischer Robert Menna Guides Bill Nowak Charlie Tabb. Team Roles. Project Objectives & Goals. Improve 13371 design

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Hydraulic nanomanipulator

Hydraulic Nanomanipulator

P13375



Introductions
Introductions

  • Customer

    Dr. Schrlau

  • Team

    David Anderson

    Ryan Dunn

    Bryon Elston

    Elizabeth Fischer

    Robert Menna

  • Guides

    Bill Nowak

    Charlie Tabb



Project objectives goals
Project Objectives & Goals

  • Improve 13371 design

    • Reduce Backlash

    • Increase Speed

    • Add Remote Access

  • Increase access to nanotechnology






Existing system p133713
Existing System (P13371)

  • Manipulator Subsystem


House of quality pareto analysis
House of Quality Pareto Analysis

  • Top Specifications

    • Ease of Use

    • Calibration

    • Video Latency

    • Manipulator Backlash

    • Control Latency

    • Limit of Travel in Each Direction

    • Resolution

    • Input Device Control (Remote and Local)

    • Speed of Travel

  • If Top 9 of 17 Specs Met

    • 75% of customer needs satisfied




Options considered
Options Considered

  • Double acting cylinders

    • $200 a piece from Parker

  • Precision pumps

    • Quoted at $2000 for one pump alone from Burt and other suppliers

  • Smaller low friction cylinders

    • Seems promising

  • Micro-stepping

    • Reduces speed proportionally to increase in resolution

  • Stiffer or softer springs

    • Tested and produced greater backlash




System proposition
System Proposition

  • Components

    • MQP10-10S Cylinders at Manipulator

    • New carriage

  • System Accomplishments

    • Double speed of P13371 (0.04 mm/s to 0.105 mm/s)

    • Maintain resolution of 104.67 nm

    • Improve robustness of system with new low friction precision pistons

      • This will improve backlash, along with better filling methods





Stepper motors1
Stepper Motors

  • Gear ratio: 13.76 planetary Gear

  • Max holding torque: 7.55 N-m

  • Max sustainable torque: 2.94 N-m

  • Step angle: 0.067 degrees

  • Max Speed: 22.88 RPM

  • # Leads: 4 – Bipolar stepper

  • Electrical: 12V supply 1.6A/phase




Resolution feasibility analysis
Resolution Feasibility Analysis

  • Lead=0.0125 in/rev = 0.3175mm/rev

  • Gear Ratio = 13.76

  • Step Angle Before Gears = 1.8°

  • With hydraulic advantage of 1.10

    • 104.67 nm/step

    • This is essentially equivalent to the spec of 100 nm/step

  • Spec Met

  • Previous team was at 54 nm


Range of motion feasibility analysis
Range of Motion Feasibility Analysis

  • Change to Manipulator Cylinders only

    • New Cylinders have a stroke of 10mm

    • Spec. is 0.25cm<x<1cm for each axis

    • 10mm=1cm

      • If the equilibrium position is set to half stroke the range of motion in each direction is 0.5 cm

    • Spec Met (FS=2)

    • Previous team was at 1.1 cm


Speed feasibility analysis
Speed Feasibility Analysis

  • Motor Speed= 22rpm

  • Lead of Lead Screw= 0.3175 mm/rev

  • Speed Spec= > 0.5 mm/s

  • 0.1056 mm/s < 0.5 mm/s

    • Spec Not Met

  • Previous team had a measured speed of 0.04 mm/s listed in technical report

    • Proposed solution provides twice the speed of previous



Friction anlaysis
Friction Anlaysis

  • Axis Units Weight

  • z (g) 104.68

  • x (g) 155.12

  • y (g) 154.91

  • x+y (g) 310.3

  • x+y+z (g) 414.71

  • x carriage assembly (g) 28.66

  • Pipette Mount 31.9 g

  • overall carriage friction coefficient 0.547 (from P13371 test results)

  • f(y-axis) = 0.547*(0.0319+0.15512)*9.81 m/s^2

  • f(y-axis) = 1.004 N

  • f(x-axis) = 0.547*(0.0319 + 0.02866)*9.81

  • f(x-axis) = 0.325 N

  • Note: Only z-axis friction due to sliding of rods in thru holes – if system is properly balanced torque will be a minimum and this will be a non-issue – can alleviate using springs around piston or alignment rods


Pressure feasibility
Pressure Feasibility

The stepper motor has been tested up to 70N

Torque Feasibility







Feasibility analysis
Feasibility Analysis

  • Manipulator was modeled in Solidworks

  • Weight =447.2 g (Spec Met of 550 g)

    • Previous team was at 689 g

  • Size 11.86 x 11.93 x 10.01 cm

    (Spec Not Met of 8 X 8 X 8 cm)

    • Previous Team was at 13 x 13 x 13






Software concept selection
Software Concept Selection

  • Decision made to implement software via D3 – MATLAB with Java networking


Matlab local model
MATLAB Local Model

  • Accepts command and control signals from client (i.e. to direct manipulator)

  • Interfaces with camera hardware for live video imaging access

  • Image processing for automated calibration (needle tip located, centered)

  • Manipulator resolution mapped to speed setting, configurable via software

  • P13371 provides working Java serial communication to microcontroller

    • Implementing USB interface


Remote access support
Remote Access Support

MATLAB local model wrapping underlying Java networking support

  • Command and Control Channel –

    • Accepts input from remote client to direct local model

      • Manipulator movement via client input devices

      • Speed control

    • Command protocol implemented via Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)

      • Connection based, ordered, error-checked command transmission

  • Media Streaming Channel –

    • Captures image/video media from manipulator microscope camera

    • Media is streamed to connected client in real time

    • Client-configurable image quality (resolution, color depth, compression)

    • Media data transmitted via User Datagram Protocol (UDP)

      • Connectionless, low overhead, reduced latency bulk data transmission


Remote access support1
Remote Access Support

  • Proof of concept MATLAB / Java software completed

    • Feasibility and reliability of software concept selection proven

    • Portable with simple, single executable and MATLAB runtime library

    • Research and development paves the way to refine final solution

Client (Remote Model)

Host (Local Model)


Remote access support2
Remote Access Support

Latency Considerations

The one-way trip time between host and client.

  • Video/image media streaming from host to client (one way)

    • Implemented via UDP for rapid, low overhead, bulk data transmission

    • Sacrifices ordering, error checking, protocol-level guarantee for real-time streaming

      • It is okay to lose image frames rather than delaying entire application/experience

        (stream may be smoothed)

  • Command sending from client to host (round trip)

    • Implemented via TCP with request/reply loop:

      • Client sends command “Move to coordinate”

      • Host receives command, provides error-checking

      • Host sends acknowledgement to client informing command has been accepted

      • Client receives acknowledgement

  • Optimal command latency: <= 200 ms




3 axis control board1
3-Axis Control Board

  • Toshiba TB6560AHQ

    • 1 – 1/16 micro stepping setting

    • 12 – 36 VDC power

    • Adjustable 0.5 – 2.5 A driver current / phase

    • PWM actuation output

  • 3-axis of motion

  • Limit switch functionality

  • Parallel port connection

  • Overload, over-current, over-temp protection



Full system test plan
Full System Test Plan

  • Cost

    • Keep track of all expenses

  • Weight

    • Weight of Manipulator (predicted 416 grams)

  • Static Coefficient of Friction

    • Force required to move each axis measured with a spring scale

  • Size

    • Measure the assembled manipulator

  • Range of Motion

    • Measure the travel distance of the piston


Test plans cont
Test Plans Cont.

  • Static Coefficient of Friction

    • Force required to move each axis measured with a spring scale

  • Range of Motion

    • Measure the travel distance of the piston

  • Sampling Rate

    • Test client and host at RIT and other system locations

  • Ease of Assembly

    • Give new users a system manual and survey their experience

  • Ease of use

    • Give new users a system manual and survey their experience


Test plans cont1
Test Plans Cont.

  • Resolution

    • Measure distance traveled after 20 revolutions of the stepper motor and compare to theoretical

  • Speed of travel

    • Measure the time taken to move the manipulator to its full range of motion

    • Time system run at max speed for 10 revs and see distance traveled

  • System backlash

    • Number of revolutions needed to change direction

  • Safe in full range of motion

    • Make sure nothing is damaged while testing limits of travel


Project cost
Project Cost

  • Cost of suggested improvements (Development Cost): ~$720

    • New Piston Cylinders

    • New Manipulator Carriage

    • Springs

    • Preious team was at $2,128

  • Estimated Manufacturing Cost: ~$1,728

    • Previous team was at $1,471



Project planning
Project Planning

  • MSD I

    • Week 11

      • Get MSD II project green light

      • Review BOM & Prepare Order Forms for long lead items to place over the summer

  • MSD II

    • Week 1

      • Obtain All parts

      • Re-familiarize ourselves with the project

      • Begin Remote access programming

    • Week 3

      • Mechanical Manufacturing is complete

      • Assembly has been begun

      • Networking Programing first draft is complete


Project planning1
Project Planning

  • MSD II (cont.)

    • Week 5

      • System Prototype assembled, and met with guide and customer

    • Week 8

      • System completely assembled and ready to begin testing

    • Week 12

      • Testing is Completed

    • Week 14

      • Final Presentation

      • User manual is complete

      • Tech. paper is complete

      • Poster is complete


Acknowledgments
Acknowledgments

  • Mr. Wellin -RIT ME Department

  • Dr. Schrlau –RIT ME Department

  • Nick Hensel – RIT ME Department

  • Bridget Lally – RIT EE Department

  • Sakif Noor – RIT ME Department

  • Team P13371