conducting research and writing research proposals n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Conducting Research and Writing Research Proposals PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Conducting Research and Writing Research Proposals

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 18

Conducting Research and Writing Research Proposals - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 112 Views
  • Uploaded on

Conducting Research and Writing Research Proposals. TECM 4180 Dr. Lam. Proposal Assignment. Hypothetical research study, project, or initiative- This means you do NOT actually have to conduct the research, complete the project, or implement the initiative. Let’s take a look at the RFP.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Conducting Research and Writing Research Proposals' - kiayada-blanchard


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
proposal assignment
Proposal Assignment
  • Hypothetical research study, project, or initiative- This means you do NOT actually have to conduct the research, complete the project, or implement the initiative.
  • Let’s take a look at the RFP
what we ll cover today
What we’ll cover today:
  • Basics of conducting research
  • Superstructure of a proposal
  • Analyzing three proposals
how research fits into our thinking theme
How Research fits into our “thinking” theme
  • We learned yesterday that all communication is persuasive
  • We also learned that “off the cuff” communication isn’t conducive to being persuasive
  • Therefore, much of the evidence we must provide has to be researched
  • We won’t actually perform formal research in this class, but I think it’s essential to start talking and thinking about it
what is research
What is research?

"a systematic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizableknowledge.”

a cademic and workplace research
Academic and workplace research
  • Similar in some ways:
    • Both are in response to a problem
    • Both provide results that lead to some kind of action
    • Both require data and analysis
  • Different in some ways
    • Workplace research is more time constrained
    • Workplace research often involves convenience samples
    • Workplace research usually results in a report, while academic research usually results in an academic publication
all research must do a few key things
All research must do a few key things:
  • Address a compelling problem
  • Study a viable solution
  • Collect “data”
  • Use a credible method for collecting the data
  • Analyze data in a meaningful way
  • Present and discuss findings
  • Lead to action
informal research
“Informal” Research
  • Informal research happens all the time in the workplace
  • The key is determining what claims require research
  • Secondary key is determining where you’ll find that data/information
proposals as a rigid genre
Proposals as a “rigid” genre
  • Proposals can be both difficult and “easy” to write
  • “Easy” because they often follow a rigid superstructure
  • Difficult because persuading people is hard
readers thought process
Readers’ thought process
  • Readers learn generally what you want to do (Intro)
  • Readers are persuaded there is a problem, need, or goal, that is important to them (problem)
  • Readers are persuaded the proposed action will be effective in solving the problem, meeting the need, or achieving the goal that they now agree is important (Objectives, solution)
  • Readers are persuaded you can plan and manage the solution (Method, resources, schedule, qualifications, and management)
  • Readers are persuaded the cost is reasonable in light of the benefits (Costs)
what then is the function of a research proposal
What, then, is the function of a research proposal?
  • To persuade your reader (could be monetary, could be time release, etc.)
  • To protect yourself
what readers and or funding agencies look for in quality research
What readers and/or funding agencies look for in quality research?
  • Is the problem worth studying?
  • Is the method sound?
  • Do you have a feasible plan?
  • Is the outcome reasonable and/or significant?
is the problem worth studying
Is the problem worth studying?
  • What are the consequences for not studying this?
    • Economic, social, political, etc.
  • What are the benefits from studying this?
  • Once you’ve established a problem, you must define research objectives.
is the method sound
Is the method sound?
  • What data are you collecting?
  • Can the data actually provide the solution you claim?
  • Are your sources of data credible?
  • Is the way in which you collect your data unbiased?
  • What makes your method the “right” method?
is the outcome reasonable and or significant
Is the outcome reasonable and/or significant?
  • Be careful not to overstate outcomes
  • Discuss outcomes in terms of immediate and future outcomes
  • Discuss outcomes in relation to broader impact
do you have a feasible plan
Do you have a feasible plan?
  • Time
  • Money
  • Resources
  • Specific
  • Are you qualified to carry out this research?
exercise
Exercise
  • Read the following proposals and rank in order of best to worst.