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Reviewing Processes in Collection Management. Sandra Bracegirdle Head of Collection Management University of Manchester. What this talk can’t do:. Not the silver bullet. Nor the Holy Grail…. Not even a magic wand:. What this talk can do:.

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Reviewing Processes in Collection Management


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    1. Reviewing Processes in Collection Management Sandra Bracegirdle Head of Collection Management University of Manchester

    2. What this talk can’t do:

    3. Not the silver bullet

    4. Nor the Holy Grail….

    5. Not even a magic wand:

    6. What this talk can do: • Focus on three examples of what has worked for one academic library in the area of Collection Management: • Acquiring material • Cataloguing costs • Shelf-ready

    7. Collection Management at Manchester • Acquisition • Cataloguing • Processing and Transportation • Stock and Logistics • Conservation and Bindery • Document Supply

    8. Impetus for change • Merger of Victoria University of Manchester and UMIST – 2004 • Co-location of processes - 2007 • Restructure of Library – 2008/09 • New staff • Staff in different posts • Clearer structures • New Library strategy • Financial Pressures - ongoing

    9. Barriers to change • Low turnover of staff, although conversely this means we have experienced and dedicated teams • Long established ways of doing things • Print dominating processes • Dewey schemes and individual shelfmarks • Transportation

    10. The beginning of the process – acquiring material • Purchasing • Budgets • Financial control • ASPI

    11. The beginning of the process – acquiring material • Purchasing • Budgets • Financial control • ASPI • Reflecting the switch from print to electronic in our workflows • Replicating print • LMS • ERM

    12. The beginning of the process – acquiring material • Purchasing • Budgets • Financial control • ASPI • Reflecting the switch from print to electronic in our workflows • Replicating print • LMS • ERM • Still not right – so what’s next?

    13. More work • LEAN • Budget analysis • Value for money • Changing mindsets • Continuous review

    14. Acquiring by donation – the bane of a librarian’s life

    15. Donations • The out of date textbooks

    16. Donations • The out of date textbooks • The weird and wonderful gifts

    17. Donations • The out of date textbooks • The weird and wonderful gifts • The “amazing collection” which turns out to be glass lantern slides, newspaper cuttings, Zoroastrian books in Pahlavi script…

    18. Donations • The out of date textbooks • The weird and wonderful gifts • The “amazing collection” which turns out to be glass lantern slides, newspaper cuttings, Zoroastrian books in Pahlavi script… • Books stored in a damp basement / garage / shed

    19. Donations – the impact • Assessment

    20. Donations – the impact • Assessment • Jumping the cataloguing queue

    21. Donations – the impact • Assessment • Jumping the cataloguing queue • Cleaning and conservation work

    22. Donations – the impact • Assessment • Jumping the cataloguing queue • Cleaning and conservation work • Storage

    23. Donations – the impact • Assessment • Jumping the cataloguing queue • Cleaning and conservation work • Storage • More stock is no longer a sign of status

    24. Getting the message across that “free to give” isn’t “free to acquire”

    25. Using lifecycle costs • Using the principles established by Helen Shenton of the British Library on lifecycle costs • Shenton, H. “Life cycle collection management”. Liber quarterly, 13 (2003) p.254-272

    26. Using lifecycle costs • Lifecycle costs at Manchester: • £23.02 per book based on a 10 year provision.

    27. Using lifecycle costs • Lifecycle costs at Manchester: • £23.02 per book based on a 10 year provision. • Cost breakdown: • Selection/Assessment: £3.20 • Acquisition processing: £2.57 • Cataloguing: £7.29 • Collection care: £1.57 (or £6.89 if repair required) • Storage: £7.90 (based on 10 years) • Average transport costs: £0.49

    28. Using lifecycle costs The question is therefore reframed as “Is this collection of 500 books worth £11,535 to the Library?”

    29. Using lifecycle costs • Gives library staff the language to say no

    30. Using lifecycle costs • Gives library staff the language to say no • Makes asking for cataloguing funding and conservation costs more transparent

    31. Using lifecycle costs • Gives library staff the language to say no • Makes asking for cataloguing funding and conservation costs more transparent • Controllable workflows and ability to prioritise the important, rather than the recently arrived

    32. Using lifecycle costs • Gives library staff the language to say no • Makes asking for cataloguing funding and conservation costs more transparent • Controllable workflows and ability to prioritise the important, rather than the recently arrived • Drop in the number and increase in the quality of donations received

    33. Using lifecycle costs • Gives library staff the language to say no • Makes asking for cataloguing funding and conservation costs more transparent • Controllable workflows and ability to prioritise the important, rather than the recently arrived • Drop in the number and increase in the quality of donations received • Donations have fallen by 60% in 3 years

    34. Example 2: Cataloguing costs

    35. Moving from perfection to efficiency without losing quality

    36. Cataloguing costs • Since 2006 cataloguing staffing costs have reduced by a third • Moving work down the grades • Doing more with less staff as record quality improves • Over 90% of our records for standard material are derived from other sources – Talisbase, RLUK database, OCLC • Early Retirement/Voluntary Severance scheme • Not replacing posts or replacing at a lower grade

    37. Changes in direction • Good enough is good enough

    38. Changes in direction • Good enough is good enough • Moved staff to work on the rare and unique • cataloguing of special collections has doubled over the last 3 years

    39. Changes in direction • Good enough is good enough • Moved staff to work on the rare and unique • cataloguing of special collections has doubled over the last 3 years • Graded uncatalogued collections • Clarity on what we have the capacity to catalogue

    40. Changes in direction • Good enough is good enough • Moved staff to work on the rare and unique • cataloguing of special collections has doubled over the last 3 years • Graded uncatalogued collections • Clarity on what we have the capacity to catalogue • RLUK shared cataloguing report due to report shortly

    41. Issues still facing • Classification and shelf-listing • Poor quality of metadata for electronic material, particularly e-books • Uncatalogued collections

    42. Example 3: Shelf-ready

    43. Shelf-ready pilot • Pilot project carried out for Business and Management stock going to the Business Library

    44. Shelf-ready pilot • Tested three assumptions: • Faster supply time order to receipt • Free up staff for other work • May not deliver sufficient benefits to be worthwhile (we were sceptical)

    45. Shelf-ready pilot • Tested three assumptions: • Faster supply time order to receipt • Free up staff for other work • May not deliver sufficient benefits to be worthwhile (we were sceptical)

    46. Shelf-ready pilot • Tested three assumptions: • Faster supply time order to receipt • Free up staff for other work • May not deliver sufficient benefits to be worthwhile (we were sceptical)

    47. Shelf-ready pilot • Tested three assumptions: • Faster supply time order to receipt • Free up staff for other work • May not deliver sufficient benefits to be worthwhile (we were sceptical)

    48. Setting up shelf-ready • We hugely underestimated the complications of setting up the shelf-ready pilot

    49. Setting up shelf-ready • We hugely underestimated the complications of setting up the shelf-ready pilot • Data flows - Liaising between our book supplier (Dawsons), the LMS (Talis), and our own IT support team

    50. Setting up shelf-ready • We hugely underestimated the complications of setting up the shelf-ready pilot • Data flows - Liaising between our book supplier (Dawsons), the LMS (Talis), and our own IT support team • New workflows