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MAXIMAL ISOMETRIC HANDGRIP STRENGTH IS ASSOCIATED WITH MEASURES OF PHYSICAL HEALTH IN OLDER ADULTS Tyler C. Scanlon, Nadia S. Emerson, William P. McCormack, Jeffery R. Stout, Jay R. Hoffman, Maren S. Fragala , Adam J. Wells, David R. Williams, Adam M. Gonzalez, Gerald T. Mangine

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MAXIMAL ISOMETRIC HANDGRIP STRENGTH IS ASSOCIATED WITH MEASURES OF PHYSICAL HEALTH IN OLDER ADULTS

Tyler C. Scanlon, Nadia S. Emerson, William P. McCormack, Jeffery R. Stout, Jay R. Hoffman, Maren S. Fragala, Adam J. Wells, David R. Williams, Adam M. Gonzalez, Gerald T. Mangine

Human Performance Laboratory, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION CONT.

RESULTS

RESULTS CONT.

RESULTS (CONT.)

  • Grip strength ranged from 9.7 to 53.3 kg (mean±SD= 30.6±12.3 kg).
  • The table and figures below presents the correlation of handgrip strength to various measurements.

Gender

=Female

=Male

R= .34*

  • It is unknown how handgrip strength performance relates to other common measures of physical health and function in healthy older adults.

BACKGROUND: Handgrip strength is a quick and simple measure of muscular function that can be measured feasibly in clinical and field settings. Its practicality has made it an attractive additional criterion for the diagnosis of sarcopenia in clinical settings. However, it is unknown how handgrip strength performance relates to other common measures of physical health and function in healthy older adults. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between maximal handgrip strength and other common measures used to assess physical health in older persons. METHODS: Thirty-six healthy older men and women (age: 71.3±6.1 y; BMI: 27.9±5.2 kg∙m-2) completed tests of muscular function including maximal isometric grip strength (GRIP) and timed sit-to-stand. Body composition was assessed by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and fasting serum samples were collected to evaluate circulating albumin and hemoglobin concentrations. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were computed to assess the relationship between handgrip strength and other measures of physical health and function. RESULTS: Grip strength ranged from 9.7 to 53.3 kg (mean±SD = 30.6±12.3 kg). Pearson’s correlation coefficient for handgrip strength and other common measures of physical health and function are as follows: Sit to stand: r=.34; Lean soft tissue (kg): r=.83; Arm lean mass (kg): r=.84; Skeletal muscle index: r=.74; Albumin (g/dL): r=.06; Hemoglobin (g/dL): r=.36. CONCLUSIONS: Maximal handgrip strength demonstrated a significant and moderate to high relationship with all variables with the exception of albumin. These data suggest that the handgrip strength may be related to physical health and nutritional status of older men and women in this study. PRACTICAL APPLICATION: The salient features of the handgrip strength test are the ease of measurement, portability of the testing device, minimal time required for testing, and relationship to other important measures of muscle strength and function. The observed positive relationship between handgrip strength and other measures of muscle mass, function, and health, provide support for the use of handgrip strength as an additional method to monitor muscle function by clinicians or personal trainers.

PURPOSE

Sit to Stand

  • The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between maximal handgrip strength and other common measures used to assess physical health in older persons.

Table 1. Relationship Between Handgrip Strengthand Common Measures for Assessing Physical Health

Figure 3. Correlation between sit to stand and grip strength.

METHODS

Handgrip Strength (kg)

Gender

=Female

=Male

R= .36*

SUBJECTS:

Thirty-six healthy older men and women

(age: 71.3±6.1 y; BMI: 27.9±5.2 kg∙m-2) completed tests of muscular function including maximal isometric grip strength (GRIP) and timed sit-to-stand.

BODY COMPOSITITON:

Body composition was assessed by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

FASTED BLOOD DRAW:

Fasting serum samples were collected to evaluate circulating albumin and hemoglobin concentrations.

STATISTICS:

Pearson’s correlation coefficients were computed to assess the relationship between handgrip strength and other measures of physical health and function.

*significance (p≤ .05)

Hemoglobin (g/dL)

Gender

=Female

=Male

R= .84*

Figure 4. Correlation between hemoglobin (g/dL) and grip strength.

Arm Lean Mass (kg)

Handgrip Strength (kg)

SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS

  • Maximal handgrip strength demonstrated a significant and moderate to high relationship with all variables with the exception of albumin.
  • These data suggest that the handgrip strength may be related to physical health and nutritional status of older men and women in this study.

Figure 1. Correlation between arm lean mass (kg) and grip strength.

30 second sit to stand test

Handgrip Strength (kg)

Gender

=Female

=Male

R= .74*

PRACTICALAPPLICATIONS

3 trial hand grip dynamometer station

  • The salient features of the handgrip strength test are the ease of measurement, portability of the testing device, minimal time required for testing, and relationship to other important measures of muscle strength and function.

Skeletal Muscle Index

  • The observed positive relationship between handgrip strength and other measures of muscle mass, function, and health, provide support for the use of handgrip strength as an additional method to monitor muscle function by clinicians or personal trainers.

INTRODUCTION

  • Handgrip strength is a quick and simple measure of muscular function that can be measured feasibly in clinical and field settings.
  • Its practicality has made it an attractive additional criterion for the diagnosis of sarcopenia in clinical settings.

Figure 2. Correlation between skeletal muscle index and grip strength.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

*Sponsored by ABBOTT NUTRITION

Handgrip Strength (kg)