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Splash Screen. Ethics Act Training. Start. Mt. Rainier photo from National Park Service. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction. Welcome Video. Welcome To Ethics Act Training Click on the W logo above to watch a 30 second video. The video discusses why, at the University of Washington,

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    1. Splash Screen Ethics Act Training Start Mt. Rainier photo from National Park Service.

    2. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Welcome Video Welcome To Ethics Act Training Click on the W logo above to watch a 30 second video. The video discusses why, at the University of Washington, we hold ourselves to a higher standard than the minimal required compliance with the State of Washington Ethics in Public Service Act (Ethics Act). This course is provided by the University of Washington Office of Internal Audit. Note to Testers: Video is in production – not a live link yet. Click the Next button to move ahead. Back Next

    3. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Course Navigation Course Modules Welcome & Introduction Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Conflicts of Interest Financial Interests in Transactions Assisting in Transactions Confidential Information Special Privileges Employment After Public Service Compensation for Official Duties Compensation for Outside Work Honoraria Gifts Use of Public Resources for Private Gain Use of Public Resources for Political Campaigns Ethics Act Training Summary This training on the State Ethics in Public Service Act (Ethics Act) training is delivered via fifteen eLearning modules. The course map is positioned at the left of this screen and at the beginning of each module, with the current module title highlighted for your orientation. The current module title is also located at the top of most screens during progression through the course. Each module title in the navigation pane is also linked directly to its starting page by one click on the title. The modules may be taken one at a time or all in one sitting, depending on the preferences of the learner. It is estimated the course will take approximately one hour. The “Next” and “Back” buttons are positioned on the bottom of most pages to move through the course. An assessment question must be answered on some pages in order to move ahead. We hope this will be an engaging method for learningthe topic of the Ethics Act. Back Next

    4. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Intro Question Introductory Question The Washington State Ethics Act applies to all actions related to your official duties whether they happen within your work day or not? Select an answer below in order to proceed. True False

    5. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Module 1: Intro to UW Ethics Act Training Introduction To University of Washington State Ethics Act eLearning Course The primary purpose of Ethics Act training is to educate all university employees on the Ethics Act and how it impacts you. The audience for this course includes all faculty, staff, administration, executive leadership, and student employees. The contents of this course are derived from the laws of the State of Washington regarding the “Ethics in Public Service Act” as written in Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 42.52. Detailed references to the laws are provided at the end of this course. Back Next

    6. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Intro Continued • Introduction Continued . . . • University of Washington - State Ethics Act eLearning Course • In addition to the training narrative, this course includes other resources in the form of FAQs, Quick Reference Guides, and supporting resource links. • Here is how the assessments work: • Answer questions as they appear throughout the course. • If an answer is not correct, an opportunity is offered, by using the “Back” button, to review the information then move ahead. • Questions must be answered in order to proceed to the next page of training. • A course completion certification is provided at the end of the course to document your completion. • Next we take a look at an overview of the course objectives. Back Next

    7. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Ethics Training Expectations • Ethics Act Training Expectations • Upon completion of the modules in this course, you will accomplish five objectives: • understand why compliance with the Ethics Act matters • acknowledge that you are a public service employee, subject to the Ethics Act • know when to ask for advice when you are unsure of requirements of the Ethics Act • know who your Ethics Advisor is • understand the personal penalties and consequences for a violation Back Next

    8. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Let’s Discuss The Ethics Act Let’s Discuss the Ethics Act Have you heard or been trained about the Ethics Act, a Washington State law? Did you know that having a good “moral compass” may not help you in complying with the technical requirements of the Ethics Act? Some people never pay attention to the Ethics Act until it’s too late, therefore, this course is written as a preventative measure to help answer both of these questions. We will look closer at the first key concept of the Ethics Act by clarifying why the Ethics Act deserves your attention in your role as a university employee. Back Next

    9. Module 1: Welcome & Introduction Core Principles The Ethics Act - Core Principles There are two core areas in which a university employee is governed by RCW 42.52 “Ethics in Public Service Act.” These include: • CONFLICTS OF INTEREST • Personal interest - Preventing personal interests or improper influences from affecting official decisions • Gifts - keeping others from buying favor • Outside Work – getting “extra” or outside compensation for your official duties or for not doing your official duties • USE OF RESOURCES • University Resources – improper use of university money and property We will discuss these and other key topics as they are codified by the State of Washington and address their specific application to university employees. Even more specifically we will take a look at why this Ethics Act information is of value to you! Back Next

    10. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Module 2 Why the Washington State Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Back Next

    11. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Course Modules Welcome & Introduction Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Conflicts of Interest Financial Interests in Transactions Assisting in Transactions Confidential Information Special Privileges Employment After Public Service Compensation for Official Duties Compensation for Outside Work Honoraria Gifts Use of Public Resources for Private Gain Use of Public Resources for Political Campaigns Ethics Act Training Summary RCW 42.52 defines the Washington State Ethics in Public Service Act. The Ethics Act does not involve personal morals or beliefs. It is a law, with which we must comply. It is also key to understand that employee compliance with the Ethics Act is very important to the UW’s success! Summary Question: Why does the Ethics Act deserve your attention as a University of Washington employee? Answer: The state Ethics Act governs an individual’s activities, not the university’s activities. The bottom line on the Ethics Act is - if a behavior or activity is prohibited, you may not do it! Back Next

    12. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Who Does the Ethics Act Govern? • University employees hold a public trust that obligates them, in a special way, to honesty and integrity in fulfilling the responsibilities to which they are appointed or hired. Above all, in that trust is the principle that public office may not be used for: • Personal gain • Private advantage • Managers and supervisors need to know and do three specific things to assure the Ethics Act is followed. They include: • Know the basic laws • Make decisions that respect the law • “Walk the talk” • There are special challenges for student employeesbecause their relationship to the university is different in their student and employee capacities. In their role as employees, students must comply with the state Ethics Act. However, students are not governed by the Ethics Act in their student activities. • Compliance with the Ethics Act presents special challenges for most UW employeesbecause the Act does not neatly fit the UW’s education-research mission and culture, specifically: • The Ethics Act was written with traditional government agencies in mind, and • Medicine, sports and other activities operate more like businesses than like other government agencies UW Employees UW Managers & Supervisors UW Student Employees UW Special Challenges Back Next

    13. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention State Executive Ethics Board • The State Executive Ethics Board • The members of the State of Washington Executive Ethics Board play an important role in the policy setting and enforcement of the Ethics Act. The Ethics Board includes the following five members, who are appointed by the governor: • An Exempt State employee • A Classified State employee • A State Auditor nominee • An Attorney General nominee • A Citizen at large • The mission of the board is to promote integrity, confidence and public trust in state government through education, interpretation and enforcement of the Ethics Act. • http://www.Ethics Act.wa.gov Back Next

    14. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention An Overview Of the Ethics Act Enforcement Elements • Click hereto learn what starts an investigation. • Clickhereto learn who is investigated. • Click here to learn who investigates. • Click here to learn what are the possible sanctions.

    15. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention An Overview Of the Ethics Act Enforcement Elements • Click here to learn what starts an investigation. • Click hereto learn who is investigated. • Click here to learn who investigates. • Click here to learn what are the possible sanctions. • A complaint can come from almost anywhere including: • Other employees • The public • Referrals from the State • Auditor’s Office • Newspapers, radio, TV

    16. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention An Overview Of the Ethics Act Enforcement Elements • Click here to learn what starts an investigation. • Click here to learn who is investigated. • Click hereto learn who investigates. • Click here to learn what are the possible sanctions. • A complaint can come from almost anywhere including: • Other employees • The public • Your computer activities • Referrals from the State • Auditor’s Office • Newspapers, radio, TV • Regulations, investigations, and enforcement are directed at you • The university cannot stand between you and the Ethics Board • This training is offered to assist employees in understanding their choices are their responsibility

    17. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention An Overview Of the Ethics Act Enforcement Elements • Click here to learn what starts an investigation. • Click here to learn who is investigated. • Click here to learn who investigates. • Click hereto learn what are the possible sanctions. • A complaint can come from almost anywhere including: • Other employees • The public • Your computer activities • Referrals from the State • Auditor’s Office • Newspapers, radio, TV • Regulations, investigations, and enforcement are directed at you • The university cannot “stand between” the employee and the Ethics Board • This training is offered to assist employees in understand their choices are their responsibility • Any or all the following may investigate allegations: • State Ethics Board • State Auditor’s Office • UW Internal Audit • UW Human Resources • Your UW Supervisor

    18. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention An Overview Of the Ethics Act Enforcement Elements • Click here to learn what starts an investigation. • Click here to learn who is investigated. • Click here to learn who investigates. • Click here to learn what are the possible sanctions. • Civil penalty of up to $5,000 per violation • Letter of reprimand • The university may suspend or terminate your employment • Prosecution • Assessment of damages • Payment of investigative costs • Action taken by the violator may be rescinded • A complaint can come from almost anywhere including: • Other employees • The public • Your computer activities • Referrals from the State • Auditor’s Office • Newspapers, radio, TV • Regulations, investigations, and enforcement are directed at you • The university cannot “stand between” the employee and the Ethics Board • This training is offered to assist employees in understand their choices are their responsibility • Any or all the following may investigate allegations: • State Ethics Board • State Auditors Office • UW Internal Audit • UW Human Resources • Your UW Supervisor Back Next

    19. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Key Learning Points Why Deserves Your Attention • Key Learning Points on Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention • The Ethics Act applies only to individuals. • Public service means public trust. • Ethics Act considerations are not limited to hard evidence of doing the right thing. Having the appearance of proper behavior also matters. That is, it must also look like you are doing the right thing. • Penalties can be substantial. Violations of RCW 42.52 Click on folders for actual Washington State Ethics Board Cases .

    20. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Case Study 1 Case Study: Employee fined $6,000 for 457 visits to shopping websites on state computers. Violations of RCW 42.52 Click on folder for actual Ethics Board Case Studies or “Back” button below to review guidelines. . Back

    21. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Case Study 2 Case Study: Employee fined $6,000 for findings of 457 visits to shopping websites on state computers. Case Study: Employee fined $6,000 for 457 visits to shopping websites on state computers. Case Study: Employee fined $500 for email sent to ten co-workers encouraging her co-workers to voice their objections to proposed legislation raising vehicle license fees. Violations of RCW 42.52 Click on folder for actual Ethics Board Case Studies or “Back” button below to review guidelines. . Back

    22. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Case Study 3 Case Study: Employee fined $6,000 for 457 visits to shopping websites on state computers. Violations of RCW 42.52 Case Study: Employee fined $500 for email sent to ten co-workers encouraging them to voice their objections to proposed legislation raising vehicle license fees. Case Study: Employee fined $10,000 for working simultaneously for a private non-profit organization during her scheduled state work hours. Click on folder for actual Ethics Board Case Studies or “Back” button below to review guidelines. Back

    23. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Case Study 4 Case Study: Employee fined $6,000 for 457 visits to shopping websites on state computers. Case Study: Employee fined $500 for email sent to ten co-workers encouraging them to voice their objections to proposed legislation raising vehicle license fees. Case Study: Employee fined $10,000 for working simultaneously for a private non-profit organization during her scheduled state work hours. Violations of RCW 42.52 Click on folder for actual Ethics Board Case Studies or “Back” button below to review guidelines. . Case Study: Employee fined $1,000 for displaying personal business sales brochures; taking orders; receiving and responding to email regarding sales orders at work. Back

    24. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Case Study 5 Case Study: Employee fined $6,000 for findings of 457 visits to shopping websites on state computers. Case Study: Employee fined $500 for email sent to ten co-workers encouraging them to voice their objections to proposed legislation raising vehicle license fees. Violations of RCW 42.52 Case Study: Employee fined $10,000 for working simultaneously for a private non-profit organization during her scheduled state work hours. Case Study: Employee fined $1,000 for displaying personal business sales brochures; taking orders; receiving and responding to email regarding sales orders at work. Case Study: Employee fined over $119,000 for multiple infractions including: directing students planning international travel with him to pay money into his personal account and running his own business using state resources. Back Next

    25. Module 2: Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Matching Exercise Matching ExerciseClick once on each gray rectangle and it will match the gray phrase to the correct purple completion phrase . The purpose of Ethics Act in public service is to Compliance is your personalduty and important to theuniversity’s success. Compliance with the Ethics Act is measured by You should be careful that your behavior also has theappearance of propriety. Strict technical compliance with the Ethics Act is important, but Ensure public trust! Following the requirementsof the law, regardless of your good intentions or personal opinion. Enforcement of Ethics Act violations includes Ethics Act deserves your attention as a public services employee because Civil penalties up to $5,000 per violation. Back Next

    26. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Module 3 Conflicts of Interest Back Next

    27. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Conflicts of Interests RCW Course Modules Welcome & Introduction Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Conflicts of Interest Financial Interests in Transactions Assisting in Transactions Confidential Information Special Privileges Employment After Public Service Compensation for Official Duties Compensation for Outside Work Honoraria Gifts Use of Public Resources for Private Gain Use of Public Resources for Political Campaigns Ethics Act Training Summary Conflicts of Interest RCW 42.52.020 governs conflicts of interest. This RCW section is titled, “Activities Incompatible with Public Duties” (Conflicts of Interest). Conflicts of interest involve the concepts of personal benefit and/or bias. Conflicts of interest occur when a potential personal benefit or other outside relationship could influence your judgment on university business. Remember that even the perception of a conflict of interest can be enough to trigger a complaint. Back Next

    28. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Conflicts of Interests Key Learning Points Key Learning Point on Conflicts of Interest This RCW states - No university officer nor university employee, may have an interest, financial or otherwise, direct or indirect, or engage in a business, or transaction, or professional activity, or incur an obligation of any nature, that is in conflict with the proper discharge of the university employee’s official duties. Given this legal requirement, we need to know more about, what constitutes an incompatible activity. An incompatible activity is any action that may conflict with the proper discharge of official duties. Such activities might include: Outside employment A volunteer activity Ownership of a private business Any private activity, relationship, business, etc. that would impair / conflict with the ability to make decisions on behalf of the university Note: Interest in any activity need not be financial for a conflict to occur. Back Next

    29. Module 1: Welcome & Intrtion Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Mod 3: Self Test for Conflicts of Interests Self Test for Conflicts of Interest Ask the following questions as a self test to evaluate the possibility that you are facing a conflict of interest: Question: Could my personal interests benefit as a result of my official actions? Question: Could a reasonable person conclude that a private or personal interest impairs my independent and impartial judgment in the exercise of my official duties? Answer: If the answer to either of these is, “Yes”, a STOPsign should illuminate. Back Next

    30. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Mod 3: High Road Low Road Conflicts of Interests Defining Conflicts of Interest Some conflicts of interest are clearly defined in the state's Ethics Act laws. They are: Having or acquiring a financial or other interest in a contract, sale, lease, purchase or grant that is under your authority or supervision Accepting a payment, gratuity or reward from someone else who has an interest in a contract, sale, lease, purchase or grant under your authority or supervision Acting in a university matter or transaction involving a business or organization in which you own an interest, or an entity in which you serve as an officer, agent, employee or member Assisting other persons, or sharing in compensation, in transactions involving the university, when you had responsibility for these transactions as a university employee Back Next

    31. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Guidelines Conflicts of Interests Conflicts of Interest Guidelines and Resources If you perceive the possibility of a conflict of interest you should review the written proceduresthe university has regarding how to handle conflicts of interest. Options generally include: Abstain - step out of the situation entirely if there is an actual or perceived violation. Disclose - tell your supervisor about the potential conflict and let them decide whether to remove you from the activity. Obtain - a “Conflict of Interest” memorandum. Have your department write a memorandum outlining the conflicts and documenting that you are to be screened from specific information or decision making regarding that particular transaction. Note: For citations regarding the guidelines, see the resources at the end of this training. Back Next

    32. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Conflict Dilemma One Conflicts of Interest Dilemma Number One You are the office administrator for a UW department. Your spouse is a partner in an excellent local web design company. You know her company does great work and charges reasonable prices. Can you call her company and ask them to help update the department’s web page? Click on your answer below. It depends Yes No Back to Guidelines on Conflicts of Interests

    33. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Conflict Dilemma Two Conflicts of Interest Dilemma Number Two You teach a university class and have assigned a book you wrote as part of the reading list. Can you make a profit on the sale of your book from students enrolled in your class? Click on your answer below. It depends Yes No Back to Guidelines on Conflicts of Interests

    34. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Conflict Dilemma Three Conflicts of Interest Dilemma Number Three You are an instructor at UW and you own a “karaoke for hire” company that plays at private parties. Can you hire several students from your current class to work part-time in your karaoke company? Click on your answer below. It depends Yes No Back to Guidelines on Conflicts of Interests

    35. Module 3: Conflicts of Interest Conflict Dilemma Five Conflicts of Interest Dilemma Number Four You won a door prize at a conference you recently attended at university expense. Can you keep it? Click on your answer below. It depends Yes No Back to Guidelines on Conflicts of Interests

    36. Module 4: Financial Interests in Transactions Module 4 Financial Interests In Transactions Back Next

    37. Module 4: Financial Interests in Transactions Financial Interests RCW Course Modules Welcome & Introduction Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Conflicts of Interest Financial Interests in Transactions Assisting in Transactions Confidential Information Special Privileges Employment After Public Service Compensation for Official Duties Compensation for Outside Work Honoraria Gifts Use of Public Resources for Private Gain Use of Public Resources for Political Campaigns Ethics Act Training Summary Financial Interests in Transactions RCW 42.52.030 governs financial interests in transactions. This RCW section prohibits university employees from participating in a university transaction if they have a financial or other interest in the transaction. Back Next

    38. Module 4: Financial Interests in Transactions Financial Interests Defined Financial Interest in University Transactions A financial interest in a university transaction includes when: • you have a personal interest in a university • contract in which you had official involvement • you receive compensation from any other • person beneficially interested in a contract made by you, through you, or by an employee you supervise • a decision you are about to make puts money • into your pocket or the pockets of friends, family • or other persons, including a business entity of • which you are a partner, board member, • managing officer or employee, that constitutes • private benefit Note: You are also prohibited from accepting, directly or indirectly, any compensation, gift or reward from any person who gets a benefit in terms of a contract, sale, lease, purchase or grant. Back Next

    39. Module 4: Financial Interests in Transactions Scenario 1 Financial Interests in Transactions • Financial Interests in Transactions • Scenario One: The Administrator • You administer a UW health facility. Your spouse is in medical sales for a small business that has bid on a contract to provide services to your facility. • How do you handle this situation? • Click one of the buttons below next to your answer. • Delegate the decision to your assistant. • Recommend that your spouse withdraw the bid. • Disclose your relationship to your supervisor and decline to participate in the award of the contract.

    40. Module 4: Financial Interests in Transactions Scenario 2 Financial Interests in Transactions • Financial Interests in Transactions • Scenario Two: The Off-the-Job Board of Directors • You serve on the Board of Directors of your favorite charity. Your charity organization has recently responded to a Requests for Proposal (RFP) that the university published for services needed. • You also sit on the UW departmental committee that reviews RFP submissions and selects the winning bidders. • What should you do? Click the correct answer button. • The RFP would be helpful to the charity’s mission and therefore is for a good cause, so you don’t have to do anything. • You must disclose your relationship with the charity and remove yourself from the RFP decision process. • You only have to disclose your role with the charity and then everything is “above-board”.

    41. Module 4: Financial Interests in Transactions Examples of Financial Interests in Transactions Incorrect Answer ! This is not the correct answer because it is not enough to disclose your financial interest. You must also remove yourself from the departmental committee selecting the winning bidder. Click the “Next” button below to move ahead. Back Next

    42. Module 5: Assisting in Transactions Module 5 Assisting in Transactions Back Next

    43. Module 5: Assisting in Transactions Assisting in Transactions RCW Course Modules Welcome & Introduction Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Conflicts of Interest Financial Interests in Transactions Assisting in Transactions Confidential Information Special Privileges Employment After Public Service Compensation for Official Duties Compensation for Outside Work Honoraria Gifts Use of Public Resources for Private Gain Use of Public Resources for Political Campaigns Ethics Act Training Summary Assisting in Transactions RCW 42.52.040 governs Assisting in Transactions. This provision limits your ability to assist others, directly or indirectly in a transaction involving the university. This section directs that if, at any time, you previously participated in that same transaction, or if the transaction was under your official responsibility within a period of two years preceding the assistance, you can not assist the transaction. This provision applies whether or not your participation is for compensation. Once you have made a decision or supervised the team that made the decision you cannot give advice or switch sides and assist the outside interests. Back Next

    44. Module 5: Assisting in Transactions Key Questions About Assisting Key Questions to Ask When Assisting in Transactions Even though part of your normal duties involves assisting people who conduct business with the university, you must think about certain relationships that could raise problems. Ask yourself questions about the potential for benefits to yourself and to those with whom you are close. You may want to “Stop” and take steps to disclose your relationships and remove yourself from the transaction. • Are your family or friends involved? • Are people you previously supervised involved? • Will your personal interests benefit as a result of your • official actions? • Would a reasonable person conclude that a private or personal • interest impairs your independent and impartial judgment in • the exercise of your official duties? • Did you previously participate in the transaction for the • external party? If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions Ask Yourself Key Questions Back Next

    45. Module 5: Assisting in Transactions Module 5 Scenario 1Let’s look at a scenario you might encounter that involves assisting in transactions.Scenario: Student Seeks ResidencyEarlier this year you transferred from the university’s Office of Student Life to a position in the HR office. Your old job involved reviewing students’ applications for residency status, which, if successful, would result in lower tuition rates.Arnold is a student whose residency application you had reviewed -- and helped reject -- last year. He wants to try again this year and has asked you to help him put together a more persuasive application package.What should you do? Help Him! Decline To Help!

    46. Module 6: Confidential Information Module 6Confidential Information Back Next

    47. Module 6: Confidential Information Confidential Info RCW Course Modules Welcome & Introduction Why the Ethics Act Deserves Your Attention Conflicts of Interest Financial Interests in Transactions Assisting in Transactions Confidential Information Special Privileges Employment After Public Service Compensation for Official Duties Compensation for Outside Work Honoraria Gifts Use of Public Resources for Private Gain Use of Public Resources for Political Campaigns Ethics Act Training Summary • Confidential Information • RCW 42.52.050 governs confidential information. • This RCW prohibits a university employee from disclosing confidential information gained through their job or otherwise using confidential information for personal gain or benefit. • Examples include: • Personal information in employees’, patients’ or students’ files that, if disclosed, would violate a person’s rights to privacy • Test questions, scoring keys and other examination data used to administer exams, tests, licensing or certifications • Applications for public employment or contracting, including the names of the applicants, resumes and other related materials • Residential addresses and residential telephone numbers of employees or volunteers of the university, held in personnel records, employment or volunteer rosters or mailing lists Back Next

    48. Module 6: Confidential Information Confidential Info Key Points • Working With Confidential Information • There are three key learning points to understand when working with confidential information in your university position. • They include: • Point One: Do not accept any employment or engage in any business or activity where you might reasonably be expected or persuaded to make an unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. • Point Two: You may not make a disclosure of confidential information or use that information for your personal gain or benefit or to benefit another. • Point Three: You may not intentionally conceal a record if: • it is considered a public record (e-mail, voice-mail, internet usage, and fax records) • you are legally required to release the information • However, if a public record was withheld in good faith and later learn this is the wrong thing to do; you then need to send the missing information as soon as possible. Back Next

    49. Module 6: Confidential Information Confidential Info Scenario 1 Confidential Information Assessment Scenario You are responsible for maintaining confidential files that relate to the potential sale of university real estate. You become aware of a property sale that would be of interest to your husband’s company. You tell your husband about the property sale at dinner. This a violation of confidential information. True False

    50. Module 7: Special Privileges Module 7Special Privileges Back Next