Tuesday, August 28 th , 2012 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Tuesday, August 28 th , 2012

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  1. Copy down agenda Journal write Mini-lesson: Complete sentences, run-ons, and fragments Writing activity based on mini-lesson Tuesday, August 28th, 2012 Reminder for Ms. Schmitt: Give “Completing sentences handout” to students! Copy down your agenda immediately and silently for two points!

  2. Journal Write • ELACC8W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.) • ELACC8W5: With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. What do you live for?

  3. Grammar Mini-Lesson: Complete Sentences, Fragments, and Run-Ons

  4. Complete sentences rule. That is a complete sentence. Recognize a complete sentence when you see one. • A complete sentence has three characteristics: • First, it begins with a capital letter. • In addition, it includes an end mark—either a period [ . ], question mark [ ? ], or exclamation point [ ! ]. • Most importantly, the complete sentence must contain at least one main (or independent) clause. • A main clause contains an independent subject and verb and expresses a complete thought.

  5. Fragments • Avoid an accidental fragment. • Sometimes you might begin a group of words with a capital letter, then conclude with an end mark, but forget to insert a main clause anywhere in the mix. • When this happens, you have written a fragment, a major error in writing. • Examples of accidental fragments: • Because hungry sharks flashed on the surface of the waves. • No main clause = a fragment. • Spilling the hot spaghetti sauce all over his new suede shoes. • No main clause = a fragment. • To buy nice jewelry for his greedy girlfriend Gloria. • No main clause = a fragment.

  6. Revising Fragments  • Read the revisions below. You will see that adding a main clause completes the thought: • Because hungry sharks flashed on the surface of the waves, Mike and Sarah decided to return their surfboards to the car. • Leonardo grabbed the pot handle with his bare hands, spilling the hot spaghetti sauce all over his new suede shoes. • Danny sold half of his comic book collection to buy nice jewelry for his greedy girlfriend Gloria.

  7. Creating complete sentences handout  • With a highlighter, HIGHLIGHT the part of the dependent clause that COULD BE independent (if it were not for the dependent marker word). In other words, what part of the clause COULD BE A COMPLETE SENTENCE? • Until he understands women, ___________________________. (He understands women.)  That could be a complete sentence. • Next, fill in the blanks with independent clauses to make them complete sentences. • Until he understands women, Gerald is going to have a hard time talking to the ladies. • If you finish early, you have the following options: • Read independently • Work on narrative homework (due tomorrow!)