slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
ACCESS TO SUCCESS IN AMERICA: Where are We? What Can We Do? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
ACCESS TO SUCCESS IN AMERICA: Where are We? What Can We Do?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 164
josiah-dillard

ACCESS TO SUCCESS IN AMERICA: Where are We? What Can We Do? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

127 Views
Download Presentation
ACCESS TO SUCCESS IN AMERICA: Where are We? What Can We Do?
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. ACCESS TO SUCCESS IN AMERICA: Where are We? What Can We Do? The State of Education Summit Las Cruces, NM August, 2013

  2. America: Two Enduring Stories

  3. 1. Land of Opportunity: Work hard, and you can become anything you want to be.

  4. 2. Generational Advancement: Through hard work, each generation of parents can assure a better life — and better education — for their children.

  5. Powerful narratives. Slipping away.

  6. Within the U.S., income inequality has been rising.

  7. Earnings among the lowest income families have declined, even amid big increases at the top. Source: The College Board, “Trends in College Pricing 2011” (New York: College Board, 2010), Figure 16A.

  8. Instead of being the most equal, the U.S. has the third highest income inequality among OECD nations. United States Note: Gini coefficient ranges from 0 to 1, where 0 indicates total income equality and 1 indicates total income inequality. Source: United Nations, U.N. data, http://data.un.org/DocumentData.aspx?q=gini&id=271: 2011

  9. Not just wages and wealth, but mobility as well.

  10. U.S. intergenerational mobility was increasing until 1980, but has sharply declined since. Source: Daniel Aaronson and BhashkarMazumder. Intergenerational Economic Mobility in the U.S.,1940 to 2000. Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago WP 2005-12: Dec. 2005.

  11. Now, instead of being the “land of opportunity,” the U.S. has one of lowest rates of intergenerational mobility. Source: Tom Hertz, “Understanding Mobility in America” (Washington, D.C.: Center for American Progress, 2006).

  12. At macro level, better and more equal education is not the only answer. But at the individual level, it really is.

  13. What schools and colleges do, in other words, is hugely important to our economy, our democracy, and our society.

  14. So, how are we doing?

  15. First, some good news. After more than a decade of fairly flat achievement and stagnant or growing gaps in K-12, we appear to be turning the corner with our elementary students.

  16. Since 1999, large gains for all groups of students, especially students of color *Denotes previous assessment format National Center for Education Statistics, “The Nation's Report Card: Trends in Academic Progress 2012”

  17. Since 1999, performance rising for all groups of students *Denotes previous assessment format National Center for Education Statistics, “The Nation's Report Card: Trends in Academic Progress 2012”

  18. Looked at differently(and on the “other” NAEP exam)…

  19. All groups have improved since 1990 *Accommodations not permitted NAEP Data Explorer, NCES (Proficient Scale Score = 249)

  20. 1996 NAEP Grade 4 Math NAEP Data Explorer, NCES

  21. 2011 NAEP Grade 4 Math NAEP Data Explorer, NCES

  22. More low-income students are performing at higher levels today than in 1996. NAEP Data Explorer, NCES

  23. Middle grades are up, too.

  24. Record performance for students of color *Denotes previous assessment format National Center for Education Statistics, “The Nation's Report Card: Trends in Academic Progress 2012”

  25. Over the last decade, all groups have improved and gaps have narrowed *Accommodations not permitted NAEP Data Explorer, NCES (Proficient Scale Score = 299)

  26. Bottom Line: When we really focus on something, we make progress!

  27. Clearly, much more remains to be done in elementary and middle school Too many youngsters still enter high school way behind.

  28. But at least we have some traction on elementary and middle school problems. The same is NOT true of our high schools.

  29. Achievement is flat in reading. NAEP Long-Term Trends, NCES (2004)

  30. Math achievement is flat over time. * Denotes previous assessment format National Center for Education Statistics, NAEP 2008 Trends in Academic Progress

  31. And gaps between groups haven’t narrowed since the late 80s and early 90s.

  32. Reading: Not much gap narrowing since 1988. *Denotes previous assessment format National Center for Education Statistics, “The Nation's Report Card: Trends in Academic Progress 2012”

  33. Math: Not much gap closing since 1990. *Denotes previous assessment format National Center for Education Statistics, “The Nation's Report Card: Trends in Academic Progress 2012”

  34. Moreover, no matter how you cut the data, our students aren’t doing well compared with their peers in other countries.

  35. Higher than U.S. average Not measurably different from U.S. average Lower than U.S. average Of 34 OECD countries, the U.S. ranks 12th in reading literacy. U.S.A. OECD “Highlights from PISA 2009,” NCES, 2010

  36. Higher than U.S. average Not measurably different from U.S. average Lower than U.S. average Of 34 OECD countries, the U.S. ranks 17th in science. U.S.A. “Highlights from PISA 2009,” NCES, 2010

  37. Higher than U.S. average Not measurably different from U.S. average Lower than U.S. average Of 34 OECD countries, the U.S. ranks 25th in math. U.S.A. “Highlights from PISA 2009,” NCES, 2010

  38. Only place we rank high? Inequality.

  39. Among OECD Countries, U.S.A. has the 4th Largest Gap Between High-SES and Low-SES Students U.S.A. PISA 2006 Results, OECD, table 4.8b

  40. Among OECD Countries, U.S.A. has the 5th Largest Gap Between High-SES and Low-SES Students U.S.A. OECD PISA 2009 Results, OECD, Table II.3.1

  41. Gaps in achievement begin before children arrive at the schoolhouse door. But, rather than organizing our educational system to ameliorate this problem, we organize it to exacerbate the problem.

  42. How? By giving students who arrive with less, less in school, too.

  43. Some of these “lesses” are a result of choices that policymakers make.

  44. Funding Gaps Between States

  45. Funding Gaps Within States: National inequities in state and local revenue per student Source: Education Trust analyses of U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Census Bureau data for the 2005-06 school year.

  46. In truth, though, some of the most devastating “lesses” are a function of choices that educators make.

  47. Choices we make about what to expect of whom.....

  48. Students in poor schools receive As for work that would earn Cs in affluent schools. Source: Prospects (ABT Associates, 1993), in “Prospects: Final Report on Student Outcomes”, PES, DOE, 1997.

  49. Choices we make about what to teach whom…

  50. Even African-American students with high math performance in fifth grade are unlikely to be placed in algebra in eighth grade • Source: NCES, “Eighth-Grade Algebra: Findings from the Eighth-Grade Round of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K)” (2010).