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Goods and Financial Markets: The IS-LM Model PowerPoint Presentation
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Goods and Financial Markets: The IS-LM Model

Goods and Financial Markets: The IS-LM Model

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Goods and Financial Markets: The IS-LM Model

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  1. Goods andFinancial Markets:The IS-LM Model

  2. The Goods Marketand the IS Relation 5-1 • Equilibrium in the goods market exists when production, Y, is equal to the demand for goods, Z. • In the simple model developed in chapter 3, the interest rate did not affect the demand for goods. The equilibrium condition was given by:

  3. Investment, Sales,and the Interest Rate • In this chapter, we capture the effects of two factors affecting investment: • The level of sales (+) • The interest rate (-)

  4. The Determination of Output • Taking into account the investment relation above, the equilibrium condition in the goods market becomes:

  5. The Determination of Output Note: The ZZ line is flatter than the 45° line only if increases in consumption and investment do not exceed the corresponding increase in output. Equilibrium in the Goods Market The demand for goods is an increasing function of output. Equilibrium requires that the demand for goods be equal to output.

  6. Deriving the IS Curve An increase in the interest rate decreases the demand for goods at any level of output. The Effects of an Increase inthe Interest Rate on Output

  7. Deriving the IS Curve Equilibrium in the goods market implies that an increase in the interest rate leads to a decrease in output. The IS curve is downward sloping. The Derivation of the IS Curve

  8. Shifts of the IS Curve An increase in taxes shifts the IS curve to the left. Shifts of the IS Curve

  9. Financial Marketsand the LM Relation 5-2 • The interest rate is determined by the equality of the supply of and the demand for money: M = nominal money stock$YL(i) = demand for money$Y = nominal incomei = nominal interest rate

  10. Real Money, Real Income,and the Interest Rate • The LM relation: In equilibrium, the real money supply is equal to the real money demand, which depends on real income, Y, and the interest rate, i: • From chapter 2, recall that Nominal GDP = Real GDP multiplied by the GDP deflator: Equivalently:

  11. Deriving the LM Curve An increase in income leads, at a given interest rate, to an increase in the demand for money. Given the money supply, this leads to an increase in the equilibrium interest rate. The Effects of an Increase in Income on the Interest Rate

  12. Deriving the LM Curve Equilibrium in financial markets implies that an increase in income leads to an increase in the interest rate. The LM curve is upward-sloping. The Derivation of the LM Curve

  13. Shifts of the LM Curve An increase in money leads the LM curve to shift down. Shifts of the LM Curve

  14. Putting the IS and theLM Relations Together 5-3 Equilibrium in the goods market implies that an increase in the interest rate leads to a decrease in output. Equilibrium in financial markets implies that an increase in output leads to an increase in the interest rate. When the IS curve intersects the LM curve, both goods and financial markets are in equilibrium. The IS-LM Model

  15. Fiscal Policy, Activity,and the Interest Rate • Fiscal contraction, or fiscal consolidation, refers to fiscal policy that reduces the budget deficit. • An increase in the deficit is called a fiscal expansion. • Taxes affect the IS curve, not the LM curve.

  16. Fiscal Policy, Activity,and the Interest Rate An increase in taxes shifts the IS curve to the left, and leads to a decrease in the equilibrium level of output and the equilibrium interest rate. The Effects of an Increase in Taxes

  17. Monetary Policy, Activity,and the Interest Rate • Monetary contraction, or monetary tightening, refers to a decrease in the money supply. • An increase in the money supply is called monetary expansion. • Monetary policy does not affect the IS curve, only the LM curve. For example, an increase in the money supply shifts the LM curve down.

  18. Monetary Policy, Activity,and the Interest Rate Monetary expansion leads to higher output and a lower interest rate. The Effects of a Monetary Expansion

  19. Using a Policy Mix 5-4 • The combination of monetary and fiscal polices is known as the monetary-fiscal policy mix, or simply, the policy mix.

  20. The Clinton-Greenspan Policy Mix

  21. The Clinton-Greenspan Policy Mix The appropriate combination of deficit reduction and monetary expansion can achieve a reduction in the deficit without adverse effects on output. Deficit Reduction and Monetary Expansion

  22. German Unification and the German Monetary-Fiscal Tug of War

  23. German Unification and the German Monetary-Fiscal Tug of War The Monetary-Fiscal Policy Mix of Post-Unification Germany

  24. How does the IS-LMModel Fit the Facts? 5-5 The Empirical Effects of an Increasein the Federal Funds Rate The two dotted lines and the tinted space between them gives us a confidence band, a band within which the true value of the effect lies with 60% probability. In the short run, an increase in the federal funds rate leads to a decrease in output and to an increase in unemployment, but has little effect on the price level.

  25. Key Terms • IS curve, • LM curve, • fiscal contraction, fiscal consolidation, • fiscal expansion, • monetary expansion, • monetary contraction, tightening, • monetary-fiscal policy mix, or policy mix, • confidence band,