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Transition Centered IEP’s In compliance with Indicator 13 Regulations

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  1. 2010 – 2011 Transition Centered IEP’s In compliance with Indicator 13 Regulations Shelley E. Hardin Applied Behavior Analysis & Transition Specialist Lexington Two Schools

  2. IDEA – 2004 The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was reauthorized on December 3, 2004 and its provisions became effective on July 1, 2005. In conjunction with the reauthorization, the U. S. Department of Education through the Office of Special Education Programs required states to develop six-year State Performance Plans in December, 2005 around 20 indicators, on which data will be submitted annually (beginning February 2007) in Annual Performance Reports.

  3. What is the purpose of Transition Services?A little more from……….. IDEA 2004 IDEA 2004 discusses the purpose of transition services as “is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child's movement from school to post-school activities” (IDEA 2004, Part B, 614, [d][1][A][VIII]; §300.43[a][1]). The Regulations, released August 14, 2006, also clarify the purpose of transition services as being “designed to meet (students’) unique needs and prepare them for further education, employment, and independent living” (§300.1[a]). IDEA 2004 does not require that LEAs are held accountable for the attainment of postsecondary goals. The stated measurable postsecondary goals are required components of transition planning. There are numerous mediating factors that positively or negatively affect an adult’s acquisition of goals, for which a school could not be held accountable. The purpose of the legislation and this indicator is that a student’s education program support their goals beyond secondary school.

  4. Indicator # 13State Performance Plan Indicator 13 measures the percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals that are annually updated and based upon an age appropriate transition assessment, transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals, and annual IEP goals related to the student’s transition services needs. There also must be evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services are to be discussed and evidence that, if appropriate, a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority.

  5. In the Palmetto State….. ….we are ahead of the game….. In South Carolina, transition age is 13! Transition services must be addressed on ALL IEP’s for ALL STUDENTS, age 13 and above.

  6. The Federal Government defines Transition as…. Transition services means a coordinated set of activities… designed within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities, including post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, and community. based on the individual student’s needs, taking into account the student’s strengths, preferences and interests; and Includes instruction, related services, community experiences, the development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives and when appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.

  7. WHY is Transition so important? Federal policy, state law – compliance More important, focuses on student outcomes Transition planning is not an add-on to the IEP, it is the student’s IEP Connects academics, employment, independent living and extra-curricular activities for the student

  8. Even more so….Why are Transition Services ESSENTIAL? Entirely too many students believe this...

  9. So…..You may be asking yourself…... “Exactly where do I begin?”

  10. 1.Familiarize yourself with the components and requirementsof Indicator 13. IEP components required in order to be Indicator 13 compliant are: A measurable postsecondary goal that addresses: Education and/or Training Employment Independent Living (if needed) Measurable postsecondary goals updated annually Age-appropriate transition assessment Transition services Course of study Aligning annual IEP goals Evidence student was invited to IEP Evidence of coordination

  11. Indicator 13 Checklists Form A

  12. Indicator 13 Checklists Form B

  13. Indicator 13 Checklists Form B

  14. Indicator 13 Checklists Form S (Shelley Hardin’s form)

  15. Make sure you address ALLquestions on the Indicator 13 checklist onEVERY IEP!

  16. 1. Is there an appropriate measurable postsecondary goal or goals that covers education or training, employment, and, as needed, independent living? NOTES: • There must be a PSG that covers education/training and employment, and, when applicable, independent living for all students age 13 and above. • PSGs are observable, measureable, and based on an outcome, not a process. • PSGs take place post-secondary (after graduation) and should not include information about what they are currently doing or plan to do in high school. • PSGs must be reasonable (in regards to the child’s ability) and individualized to each student. Does the PSG address: ___ Education/Training ___ Employment ___ Independent Living (when appropriate)

  17. Post Secondary Goals Measurable = Countable Identifies an outcome, not a process One goal for each adult outcome area Adult Outcome Areas Education or Training (required) Employment (required) Independent Living (when appropriate)

  18. Guiding Questions for writingPost-Secondary Goals Where is the student going to work or engage in productive activities after graduation? Where and how is the student going to continue to learn and/or develop skills after graduation? Where is the student going to live and how is he or she going to access adult services, participate in the community and have fun after graduation?

  19. Formula for writing Post-Secondary Goals ______ ______ will ______ ______ (After high school) (Student Name)(Behavior) (Where and how) (After graduation) (Upon completion of high school)

  20. Post-Secondary Goals:Students with Mild Disabilities Education/Training: Upon graduation from high school, Jamarreo will attend Central Piedmont Community College and participate in the welding industry certificate program meeting the requirements to attain an Entry Level Welding Certificate. Employment: Upon graduation from high school, Jamarreo will work part-time as a shop helper in his uncle’s shop to gain experience in the automotive repair industry. Independent Living: After graduation, Jamarreo will follow the laws of his community, demonstrating an understanding of the need for laws to ensure his and others’ safety.

  21. Post-Secondary Goals:Students with Moderate Disabilities Education/Training: After high school, Lissette will participate in weekly instruction on independent living skills at the local Independent Living Center in her community Employment: After high school, Lissette will work on-campus part-time in the food court at the college with supports from Vocational Rehabilitation and the staff at the college. Independent Living: After high school, Lissette will live semi-independently with a roommate in a assisted living apartment with supports provided through Disability Services) Upon completion of high school, Lissette will utilize public transportation, including the public bus and uptown trolley with time limited supports provided through Vocational Rehabilitation.

  22. Post-Secondary Goals:Students with Severe Disabilities Education/Training: After graduation, Lilly will participate in a center-based program with an adult curriculum focused on gaining maximum social communication, daily living, and vocational skills. Employment: After graduation, Lilly will participate in a center-based program with an adult curriculum, receiving services to increase her stamina and mobility to prepare her for work. Independent Living: After graduation Lilly will use an augmentative communication device at home and the center-based program to communicate her wants, needs, and desires and to interact with her environment more independently

  23. 2. Is (are) the postsecondary goal(s) updated annually? NOTES: • The PLAAFP that covers the child’s transnational/vocational/career(most often found in functional performance) needs must have been updated with current assessment information within one year of the development of the current IEP. On the PLAAFP, is: ___ The date within 1 year of the IEP meeting date? ___ The data current and was updated since the last annual review?

  24. Is (are) the postsecondary goal(s) updated annually? Example: The statement of Present Level of Academic and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) indicates that “Lissette’s educational goals beyond high school were considered and updated based on transition assessment information in  developing this IEP”   Non-example: Postsecondary goals were evident, but PLAFFP indicates “Lissette passed her classes .” Further the assessment data documented in the IEP (formal and informal) are two and three years old

  25. 3. Is there evidence that the measurable postsecondary goal(s) were based on age appropriate transition assessment? NOTES: • The development of the PSGs must be based on age appropriate transition assessment which is specified in the present level section in the IEP. • The age appropriate transition assessment is directly linked to the PSG and gives details as to how the IEP team determined the child’s PSG. In the PLAAFP: ____ Evidence of age appropriate transition assessment is clearly stated/specified. ____ There is clear linkage between the PLAAFP and the PSG.

  26. Transition Assessment Questions Where is the individual presently? Where is the individual going? How do we get the individual there? (Colorado DPI, 2005)

  27. Transition Assessments Student Questionnaire Casey Life Skills All Assessments must have some type of written documentation to prove the assessment was done!

  28. 4. Are there transition services in the IEP that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goal(s)? NOTES: • Possible transition services include instruction, related service, community experience, development of employment other post-school adult living objectives, acquisition of daily living skills, and/or provision of a functional vocational evaluation. • Transition services are individualized, coordinated sets of activities that are designed to facilitate movement towards the child’s PSGs. • There are no minimum or maximum or maximum number of transition services that need to be provided. • For each transition service marked, there must be a coordinating annual goal (or objective) identified that addresses this specific service. Which transition services are checked? ___ Instruction ___ Community Experiences ___ Acq. of Daily Living Skills ___ Related Services ___ Dev. Of Employment and Post-School Objectives ___ Functional Vocational Eval.

  29. 5. Do the transition services include courses of study that will reasonably enable the student to meet his or her postsecondary goal(s)? NOTES: • There must be an acceptable course of study identified that is supported by the child’s diploma/certificate plan. • The course of study should be one that addresses the students specific transition needs in order to prepare the student to meet their post-secondary goal upon exiting school. This program should address any areas of weakness in regards to the child’s future education, employment/training, and daily living (if necessary). Does the course of study prepare the student for their PSG in all areas addressed? ___ Education ___ Employment/Training ___ Daily Living

  30. 6. Is (are) there annual IEP goal(s) related to the student’s transition services needs? NOTES: • There must be an observable, measureable annual goal (or an objective) that addresses each of the planned transition services that are checked in section I of the IEP under “transition service needs”. The annual goals: ____ Are measurable. ____ Address each transition service checked in Section II of the IEP

  31. Annual IEP Goal Questions What skills and knowledge must the student attain this academic year that are necessary for achieving the identified post-secondary goals? What skills and knowledge does the student currently have that support their post-secondary goals?

  32. Formula for writing a measurable goal

  33. 7. Is there evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services were discussed? NOTES: • When transition services are discussed for any child age 13 and up, the student must be invited to the meeting. • Proof of invitation may include: IEP invitation letter, meeting minutes, etc. • The district must maintain documentation that this has occurred. Is there evidence the child was invited by: ___ Invitation letter ___ Meeting minutes ___ Other ________________

  34. Invitation to Student For the current year, is there evidence in the IEP or cumulative folder that the student was invited to attend the IEP team meeting? Example: A letter, inviting the student to the IEP meeting, is in the student’s file. Non-example: A box is checked indicating that the student did not attend the IEP meeting. While student attendance is not a component of this item, there is no indication in this documentation that the student was invited prior to the meeting.

  35. 8. If appropriate, is there evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority? NOTES: • When an outside agency is invited to the development of the IEP, written consent must be obtained by the parent prior (or the student, if they are 18 or older) to the invitation. The district must maintain documentation that this has occurred.

  36. Evidence of Agency Coordination Are there transition services listed on the IEP that are likely to be provided or paid for by an outside agency? If so, include: Agencies identified that would provide or pay for post-secondary services Evidence of parent consent (or student consent at age of majority) to invite agencies Evidence that agencies were invited to the IEP meeting

  37. 2. Know your students! How can you know your students?

  38. 3. Ask Questions!!!! How can you know your students?

  39. Let’s Practice!!! Post-Secondary Goals

  40. Education/Training Example • This goal meets NSTTAC Indicator 13 (I-13) standards for item #1 for the following reasons: • Participation in postsecondary education is the focus of this goal. • Obtaining a degree at a college can be observed, as Allison gets a degree or does not. • Obtaining a college degree occurs after graduation from high school. • After graduation from high school, Allison will attend a 4-year Liberal Arts College and take coursework leading to a major in the area of Child Development 40

  41. Education/Training NonExample • These goals do not meet I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reason: • “Plans” does not indicate an explicit behavior by the student that will occur after high school that can be observed as occurring or not occurring. After leaving high school, Rolanda’s family plans to apply for habilitative training through Medicaid Community Alternatives Program (CAP) services. 41

  42. Education/Training NonExample • These goals do not meet I-13 standards for item #1 for the following reasons: • “wants” is not an observable goal • Allison wants to take a CPR/first aid class after high school. 42

  43. Employment After high school, Jodi will volunteer for 10 hours per week at the local hospital in the medical records department, food service department, and patient services with time limited supports of a job coach. These goals meets I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reasons: Participation in or maintenance of employment is the focus of these goals. Expectation, or behavior, is explicit, as in Jodi continues employment, or does not. It is stated in this goal that increased employment and use of adult services will occur after Jodi leaves high school. Example 43

  44. Employment Example • These goals meets I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reasons: • Participation in or maintenance of employment is the focus of these goals. • Expectation, or behavior, is explicit, as in Kevin continues employment, or does not and Kevin accesses adult agency service (or does not). • It is stated in this goal that increased employment and use of adult services will occur after Kevin leaves high school Within three months after graduation, Kevin will obtain a supported employment position that allows him to work to his maximum stamina and incorporates the use of assistive technology. 44

  45. Employment NonExample • These goals do not meet I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reasons: • Working with VR is not measurable as stated. • The expectation for learning, or behavior, is not explicitly stated. • “Ensure community employment” suggests a process, not an outcome. • It is not clear that the activities will continue to occur, or will occur after high school. Alex will work with vocational rehabilitative services to ensure community employment. 45

  46. Independent Living NonExample • These goals do not meet I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reasons: • Goal is not measurable as stated. • Parental assistance is not a specific skill to be learned by Stephanie • “Looking” for an apartment is not measurable Stephanie will look for an apartment to live in after high school. 46

  47. Independent Living Example • These goals meet I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reasons: • Participation in independent living skill development, specifically community participation, is the focus of this goal. • Use of the bus can be measured, as in Jodi performs the necessary activities or does not perform the activities. • The expectation, or behavior, is explicit, as in Jodi performs the required activities or she does not. After high school, Jodi will travel to and from work using the public transportation system with time-limited supports of a job coach or Community Alternative Program service provider. 47

  48. Independent Living Example • These goals meet I-13 standards for Item #1 for the following reasons: • Development of independent living skills is the focus of these goals. • Preparing for work is observable, as in Stephanie demonstrates the skill or she does not. • Stated that the goal will occur after Stephanie exits high school. • Upon completion of high school, Stephanie will independently prepare for work each day, including dressing, making her bed, and making her lunch. 48

  49. Online Resources National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC) http://www.nsttac.org/ South Carolina Department of Education http://ed.sc.gov/

  50. District Contact Information