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You need your text book. Lesson 18 Day 2. Phonics and Spelling. Suffixes are word parts added to the ends of root words. Suffixes change the meaning of the root word. Turn to Student Edition page 84 and let’s review the definitions of the suffixes on that page.

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phonics and spelling
Phonics and Spelling
  • Suffixes are word parts added to the ends of root words.
  • Suffixes change the meaning of the root word.
  • Turn to Student Edition page 84 and let’s review the definitions of the suffixes on that page.
  • On the next slide we are going to read each root word and give its meaning. Then, we will name the word that would be made by adding the suffix listed and determine the meaning of the new word.
phonics and spelling5
Phonics and Spelling
  • Read the following sentences. Which words have suffixes? What do the words mean?
  • I think the box in green is nicer than the box in red.
  • Amelia has the smallest book.
  • Run quickly to the corner.
  • Sam cheered at the joyful news.
phonics and spelling6
Phonics and Spelling
  • When the suffix –er or –est is added to a word with a final e, the final e is dropped.
  • For example, nice + er = nicer
  • When these suffixes are added to root words that end with a short-vowel CVC pattern, the final consonant is doubled.
  • For example, big + est = biggest
  • In words that end in y, the y changes to i before a suffix is added.
  • For example, happy + er = happier
vocabulary
Vocabulary
  • Turn to Student Edition p. 86-87.
  • Read the selection titled “Harlem Artists.”
glorious
glorious

If something is so wonderful that you can hardly believe it, it is glorious.

What would the weather be like on a glorious day?

What is a glorious work of art that you have seen?

memory
memory

A memory is something you remember.

How might a good memory be better than a photograph?

How does a person use his or her memory to paint?

ruined
ruined

If something is ruined, it is no longer any good.

What might have ruined a picnic?

Why do you think Augusta Savage thought her career would be ruined if she stayed in her small town?

streak
streak

To streak is to move very quickly from one place to another.

What might streak?

What do you think of art with colors that streak across it?

crept
crept

If you crept, you moved slowly and carefully so that you wouldn’t be seen or heard.

When have you crept?

How did the piano player’s fingers move when they crept across the keys?

yanked
yanked

If you yanked something, you gave it a quick, hard pull.

When have you yanked a door?

How would a trombone player have looked as he yanked on the slide?

grammar articles
Grammar: Articles

Articles are words that tell about people, places, or things.

a and an refer to one person, place, or thing out of many

a is used before words that begin with consonant sounds

an is used before words that begin with vowel sounds

Kareem met an artist.

The article an lets us know that Kareem met one artist out of many. The article an is used, rather than a, because artist begins with a vowel sound.

grammar
Grammar
  • He was an teacher.
  • What is wrong with the sentence above?
  • What is the correct article that should be used in that sentence?
  • Wanda has a apple.
  • What is wrong with the sentence above?
  • What is the correct article that should be used in that sentence?
  • Ken has an pear.
  • What is wrong with the sentence above?
  • What is the correct article that should be used in that sentence?
me and uncle romie
“Me and Uncle Romie”
  • Turn in your Reading book to page 88-89.

Genre Study

  • Historical fiction is a made-up story that is set in the past.
  • Look for…
  • People and places that did exist or could have existed.
  • Plot events that did happen or could have happened.
  • Historical fiction usually involves an important event or time period in the past. Historical fiction often mixes made-up and real people, places, and events.
  • Historical fiction entertains readers and teaches them about the past.
slide17
Comprehension Strategies
  • Use story structure to help you understand a story and its parts.
  • Thinking about the characters, setting, and plot of a story will help you to understand what is happening.
  • In historical fiction stories, the time and place in which a story happens is especially important.
slide18

As you read “Me and Uncle Romie,” you will fill in the graphic organizer on Practice Book page 153. The graphic organizer will help you remember important information about characters, plot, setting, and theme.

Characters

Setting

Plot

Theme

me and uncle romie19
“Me and Uncle Romie”
  • You are going to read a story about a boy who visits some relatives he does not know very well.
  • One way to get to know family members is to share memories.
  • One purpose for reading historical fiction is for enjoyment.
  • Turn to Student Edition pages 88-89.
  • Look at the title and illustrations.
  • Where do you think this story takes place?
  • How do you think the boy feels?
  • What do you think the boy will do with Uncle Romie?
retelling
Retelling
  • Remember that the theme of a story is its main message, or idea.
  • Once you finish reading the story, describe the theme of “Me and Uncle Romie.”
  • Then, write a summary of the story. You may want to refer to the information on Practice Book page 153 to recall important information about story structure and theme.
fluency
Fluency
  • It is important to think about which words go together in a group.
  • Punctuation marks, such as commas and periods, help readers follow the phrasing of a piece of writing.
  • Sentences can also be divided into phrases according to when an idea or thought begins and ends.
  • Turn to Student Edition page 90 and follow along as I read with the correct phrasing. Notice how I pause at commas and periods.