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You need your text book.

You need your text book.

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You need your text book.

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  1. You need your text book. Lesson 29 Day 1

  2. Phonics and Spelling A prefix is a word part added to the beginning of another word to form a new word with its own meaning. nonstop What is the prefix? The rest of the word? Now blend the parts to read the whole word aloud. oversize What is the prefix? The rest of the word? Now blend the parts to read the whole word aloud. biweekly What is the prefix? The rest of the word? Now blend the parts to read the whole word aloud. Recognizing prefixes can help you figure out the meanings of words. nonstop I know that the prefix non- means “not or without,” so nonstop means “without a stop.” oversize I know that the prefix over- means “more than or above,” so oversize means “a size above” or “a size too big.” biweekly I know that the prefix bi- means “twice”, “two,” or “every two,” so biweekly means “every two weeks.”

  3. Spelling • overfeed • What is the prefix? What does the word mean? • bimonthly • What is the prefix? What does the word mean? • nonelectric • What is the prefix? What does the word mean? • Copy the following words into your notebook. Underline the prefixes and write the definitions for the words. • bicycle nonprofit overdressed

  4. Spelling Pretest 1. overnight 2. bicycle 3 nonstop 4. overdue 5. overlook 6. biweekly 7. overflow 8. nonsense 9. oversee 10. overhead 11. nonfiction 12. overcoat 13. nonfat 14. overdone 15. biplane

  5. Make Predictions Comprehension • Turn to Student Edition page 380. • Good readers first look for clues in the words and pictures on the page. Next they combine these clues with what they know from real life. Then they continue reading to see if their predictions are correct. If their predictions were incorrect or if there is new information, good readers change their predictions or make new ones. • Now let’s read the selection title on page 381. • Readers often can use a title to predict what a selection will be about. • From the title, I know that this selection will have to do with space travel to Saturn. I am not sure exactly where “beyond” is. But using what I already know helps me predict that the journey also will be to places farther away than Saturn. When I read the first sentence, I see that I am correct. • Good readers check their predictions as they read and change them when they need to. • Complete the What I Learned column of the chart before making predictions.

  6. Listening Comprehension • You will be listening to a nonfiction selection that describes objects seen in space. • What do you know about what we see in space? • “Look! Up in the Sky!” is expository nonfiction that gives information about a topic. When you listen to expository nonfiction, you should listen to gain information. • From the title, I know that this selection has to do with objects seen in the sky. I expect to learn facts about objects seen in the nighttime sky such as the moon and the stars. • Good readers make predictions based on picture or word clues along with what they already know as they read. Good readers also revise their predictions when they find new information.

  7. Listening Comprehension • During Reading: • What do you think you will learn about next? • Make predictions by combining word and picture clues with what you already know about space. • After Reading: • Name different lights that can be seen in the sky. • Stars, planets, galaxies, star clusters, nebulas, comets, meteors, airplanes, satellites • How can you tell the selection is expository nonfiction?

  8. Robust Vocabulary Stars are distinct, twinkly, unmoving points of light. When there are several similar but separate objects, the objects are said to be distinct. Would something that is distinct be easy or hard to see? If the fuzzy object changes position slightly form day to day, it could be a comet. When something happens slightly, you can barely tell it happened. Would a flag be blown slightly by the wind or by your breath?

  9. Robust Vocabulary • Outer space is so large, that its size could be called infinite. • When there is so much of something that it cannot be measured, it is infinite. • What could be infinite, love for a dog or a block of wood? • Voyager II has given scientists an expansive view of Neptune. • Something that is expansive covers a very large area. • What could be described as expansive, a palace or a log cabin?

  10. Grammar: Capitalization • Every sentence begins with a capital letter. Proper nouns that name a particular person, place, or thing also begin with capital letters. • The first woman from the United States to go into space was Sally Ride. • The first letter is always a capital letter. United States is a particular place. The first word and every important word in the name of a particular place begins with a capital letter. Each word in a person’s name begins with a capital letter.

  11. Grammar: Capitalization • Each sentence has one or more errors in capitalization. Identify the words that need to be capitalized in each sentence. Remember, the first word and proper nouns should begin with a capital letter. • star charts will help you identify stars. • our galaxy, the milky way, gets its light from stars. • the meteor shower called the geminids happens every november. • robert burnham is the author of a book about comets. • jupiter, venus, mars, and saturn are easier to see in the night sky than the other planets. • the Perseids, a meteor shower, occurs on earth on the twelfth day of august.

  12. Grammar • Star charts will help you identify stars. • Our galaxy, the Milky Way, gets its light from stars. • The meteor shower called the Geminids happens every November. • Robert Burnham is the author of a book about comets. • Jupiter, Venus, Mars, and Saturn are easier to see in the night sky than the other planets. • The Perseids, a meteor shower, occurs on Earth on the twelfth day of August.

  13. Writing: Paragraph That Contrasts • The paragraph we are going to read contrasts two types of objects in space. • Paragraph That Contrasts … • Identifies two things being contrasted • States the main idea • The ideas in a paragraph that contrasts contain accurate details that support the main idea and the sentences stay focused on the topic. • We are going to use information from the student writing model to identify differences between asteroids and comets. We will list them on the chart below.

  14. Student Model: Paragraph That Contrasts Asteroids and comets have some things in common, and people often have trouble knowing which is which. There are several differences, however, that will help you tell apart these two bodies in space. First, these objects are not made of the same materials. Asteroids are made of rocks and metals, while comets consist of ice and dust. Next, although both asteroids and comets orbit the sun, the location of their orbits is different. Asteroids usually are found in the Asteroid Belt, which is between Jupiter and Mars. On the other hand, most comets orbit far from this, moving through the outermost and coldest parts of the solar system. Finally, it should be no surprise that asteroids and comets have different appearances and opportunities for sightings. Asteroids do not form tails and usually cannot be seen by the eye. Comets, however, may form tails and sometimes can be see when they pass closer to the sun. Knowing these simple facts can help you know the differences between comets and asteroids.

  15. Writing • Writing Prompt: • Choose two objects that have differences and create a list of these differences. • Write about the differences between what you see in the daytime sky and what you see in the nighttime sky.