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Bundles in Captivity: An Application of Superimposed Information (the software architecture for superimposed applications). Lois Delcambre, David Maier, Shawn Bowers, Mathew Weaver, Longxing Deng, Paul Gorman, Joan Ash, Mary Lavelle, Jason Lyman Database and Object Technology Lab

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    1. Bundles in Captivity: An Application of SuperimposedInformation(the software architecture for superimposed applications) Lois Delcambre, David Maier, Shawn Bowers, Mathew Weaver, Longxing Deng, Paul Gorman, Joan Ash, Mary Lavelle, Jason Lyman Database and Object Technology Lab Computer Science and Engineering Department Oregon Graduate Institute Division of Medical Informatics and Outcomes Research Oregon Health Sciences University

    2. Outline • introduction to superimposed information • application of our work • SLIMPad: NSF Digital Libraries 2 Program • our architecture for building superimposed applications

    3. What is Superimposed Information? data “placed over” existing information sources to: • highlight • annotate • elaborate • select • collect • organize • connect • reuse information elements often to support new applications, beyond the original

    4. Examples of Superimposed Information • Non-electronic examples: • Commentaries on religious texts, law, literature • Concordances, citation indexes • Electronic examples: • Your bookmark file in your web browser • RDF metadata

    5. Why work on it now? • Broadening range of digital information • Accessibility/addressability to base information • Reference (e.g., URL) can be resolved quickly • Addressing at various levels of granularity • Emerging Standards: RDF, Topic Maps, Xlink • Emerging Applications: • Third Voice, Multi-Valent Documents, ...

    6. The superimposed and base layers with marks Superimposed Layer marks Base Layer Information Source1 Information Source2 Information Sourcen … Focus: building generic technology

    7. Styles of Superimposed Applications superimposed application base application1 web browser (with extra functions such as annotation) ... base application2 enhanced base layer application simultaneous use of base and superimposed applications

    8. Outline • introduction to superimposed information • application of our work • SLIMPad (NSF Digital Libraries 2 Program) • our architecture for building superimposed applications

    9. Paul Gorman, MD Lois Delcambre, PhD David Maier, PhD

    10. Bundles in the wild……….. Observational team:Paul GormanJoan AshMary LavelleJason Lyman …………..Bundles in captivity Computer science team:Lois DelcambreDave MaierShawn BowersMathew Weaver Rupa Tummala

    11. Let’s take a trip to the ICU

    12. (Wild) Bundles

    13. (Wild) Bundles • There is benefit in creating (active processing of information) • There is benefit in reusing (trigger memory) • There is benefit in sharing (establish collective, situated awareness)

    14. Given…. • bundles are everywhere! • access to bundles provides access to important information • information in bundles is often copied from other information sources • we can keep copied/referenced information linked through the use of marks

    15. SLIMPad demobuilt using our architecturesimple applicationminimal interface to base layer (create mark, go to mark)

    16. Outline • introduction to superimposed information • application of our work • SLIMPad (NSF Digital Libraries 2 Program) • our architecture for building superimposed applications

    17. Superimposed Layer Information Manager (SLIM) Architecture:Contributions • Mark Management - to create/resolve marks • SLIM API - for the application developer • TRIM store - for generic storage of superimposed information

    18. SLIM API: as seen by application

    19. Storing Superimposed Information • Provides a level of abstraction above models • Describes the structural features of models Basic Set of Abstractions Metamodel Model Constructs and Relationships Topic Map XML Topic Map Defintions Schema-Level Data DTD Topic Map Instances XML Document Instance-Level Data

    20. Model, Schema, and Instance data - all represented uniformly using triples

    21. Future Work • Field trial of SLIMPad (e.g., Saturday rounds) • Validate bundles/SLIMPad results in 2nd application • Extend SLIMPad, perhaps suited for a medical task • Extend architecture • Extend the metamodel (to accommodate more data models) • Formalize the metamodel • Develop addressing mechanisms to accompany structural constructs (to support canonical marks)

    22. For more information • www.cse.ogi.edu/footprints“Tracking footprints through a medical information space” • www.cse.ogi.edu/forest“Harvesting information to sustain our forests” lmd@cse.ogi.edu maier@cse.ogi.edu

    23. Harvesting Information to Sustain our Forests: Creating an Adaptive Management Portal NSF DIGITAL GOVERNMENT PROGRAM Tim Tolle & Lois Delcambre ttolle@fs.fed.us lmd@cse.ogi.edu Co-Project Directors

    24. Project focuses on the: Adaptive Management Areas USDA Forest Service USDI Bureau of Land Management USDI Fish and Wildlife Service

    25. Adaptive Management Portal:a value-added, Internet-based service • Provide multiple access paths to forest information. • Preserve local autonomy and local focus of each site. • Support diverse users and types of information. • Use proposed, existing, and de facto standards for content, classification, and technology. • Be low-cost, scalable, extensible.

    26. ... Place 2 Place 6 Place 1 Feature: search by one or more aspect climate controlled vocabulary user browses to find documents

    27. ... Place 2 Place 6 Place 1 Similarity Search climate controlled vocabulary user wants studies in places like this one 4 3 5 2 1

    28. Project Funding • Duration: 3 years • Budget: $1.5 million • Principal financial sponsors • National Science Foundation • Bureau of Land Management (Oregon State Office) • Forest Service (R-6 and PNW Station) • National Park Service (Western Region)

    29. Team Members Tim Tolle Regional Coordinator for AMA, US Forest Service Eric Landis Forest Information System Specialist, Consultant Craig Palmer Natural Resources Monitoring Expert, UNLV Fred Phillips Professor, Head, Mgt. of Science and Tech., OGI Patty Toccalino Asst. Prof., Environmental Science and Eng., OGI Lois Delcambre Professor, Computer Science and Eng., OGI David Maier Shawn Bowers Mat Weaver Professor, Computer Science and Eng., OGI PhD Student, Computer Science and Eng., OGI PhD Student, Computer Science and Eng., OGI Forest/environmental expertise Computer science expertise

    30. Advisory Board Co-Inventor of the Topic Map Model Michel Biezunski President, IUFRO, Oxford Forestry Institute, Dept of Plant Sciences Jeff Burley USDA Forest Service, Pacific NW Region Robert Devlin Martin Goebel Sustainable Northwest MD, Asst. Professor, Division of Medical Informatics and Outcomes Research, OHSU Paul Gorman Executive Director, IMFN Secretariat Fred Johnson Chief, Office of Technical Support, Forest Resources, USDI Fish and Wildlife Service Monty Knudsen Communications Director, USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station Cynthia L. Miner Science Advisor, USDI, National Park Service Regina Rochefort Staff Scientist, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mark Whiting Forest/environmental expertise Computer science expertise

    31. Task 1 – Status • Workshops @ Snoqualmie Pass Adaptive Management Area, Cle Elum, WA (June and July) • Interviews with Forest Service Corvallis Forest Sciences Lab and USGS FRESC, Corvallis (August) • Interviews with Central Cascades Adaptive Management Area, Eugene (August) • Interviews with the Applegate Partnership and its associated agencies (August) • Rainier National Park (planned for October)

    32. Things we’ve learned from Task 1 NSF Digital Government • work is project-based • primary product is information: assessments, studies, surveys, environmental impact statements • multiple agencies are involved • each agency serves as information gatherer; information broker; information consumer • even though information is a primary product, information technology is secondary (stewardship of the land is the primary mission)