native american tobacco education project nate n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Native American Tobacco Education Project (NATE) PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Native American Tobacco Education Project (NATE)

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 68

Native American Tobacco Education Project (NATE) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 136 Views
  • Uploaded on

Native American Tobacco Education Project (NATE). Funded by a grant from the CDPHE State Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership (STEPP). Partners. Native American Cancer Research (NACR) Ute Mountain Ute Tribe. NACR Staff. Dr. Burhansstipanov - Project Director

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Native American Tobacco Education Project (NATE)' - jessica-george


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
native american tobacco education project nate

Native American Tobacco Education Project (NATE)

Funded by a grant from the CDPHE State Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership (STEPP)

partners

Partners

Native American Cancer Research (NACR)

Ute Mountain Ute Tribe

nacr staff

NACR Staff

Dr. Burhansstipanov - Project Director

Lisa Harjo - Project Coordinator

Terri Rattler - Native Sister

Rose Lee - Native Sister

(Navigators)

native american tobacco education nate

Native American Tobacco Education (NATE)

Multi-Agency project using Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methodology to develop a sustainable infrastructure for the local tobacco control movement in the Indian community in Denver and at Ute Mountain Ute.

two advisory coalitions
Two Advisory Coalitions
  • one in the Denver Metropolitan Area
  • one within Ute Mountain Ute Reservation.
purpose
Purpose
  • to develop an infrastructure that will allow both Native communities to assess local needs and potential strategies to prevent and reduce habitual tobacco use or exposure to secondhand smoke by Native American adolescents and adults, ages 12 to 85.
expected outcomes
Expected Outcomes
  • two functional Native Tobacco Coalitions (one in each site)
  • baseline data from local focus and working groups to help the Coalitions prioritize issues; and
expected outcomes cont
Expected Outcomes cont.

(3)a list of recommendations based on the focus and working group input by the respective Coalitions for tribal- and geographically-specific tobacco interventions they feel need to be developed in the near future to appropriately address the priorities in culturally respectful manners.

nate project goal
NATE Project Goal
  • To increase Native communities’ capacity for tobacco control by developing two well educated Native American Tobacco Education Coalitions in Denver and Ute Mountain Ute Reservation.
strategy 1
Strategy 1

Educate both of the Native tobacco control coalitions on the latest, most appropriate tobacco prevention and control information and interventions effective within Native and non-Native communities (includes evidence–based and native-specific strategies.)

strategy 2
Strategy 2

The NATE Coalitions will each recruit community members to take part in FG held in March and April in two different geographic locations in their respective communities (4 FG in Denver and 2 FG in Towaoc).

strategy 3
Strategy 3
  • The NATE Coalition from each site will review the expanded prioritized tobacco topics for their respective area (i.e., two different priority lists which are likely to have some overlap, yet issues specific to the rural or urban communities) and organize the priorities into a strategic plan.
strategic plan
Strategic Plan
  • This strategic plan will include
  • (a) goals for next 3 years;
  • (b) measurable objectives to attain those goals;
  • (c) culturally acceptable and innovative strategies to attain the objectives;
strategic plan cont
Strategic Plan cont.
  • (d) participant interactive activities to reinforce the behaviors specified within each objective;
  • (e) evaluation strategies specific to each objective; and
  • (f) dissemination of recommendations plan (to local communities, State funders and others as needed).
strategic plan1
Strategic Plan
  • This outline will be the beginning of a strategic plan for subsequent funding to develop interventions inclusive of these components that are culturally specific and designed to prevent, reduce, or control habitual tobacco use among Native Americans.
advisory coalition
Advisory Coalition
  • Meets every other month for 2 hours
  • Training in beginning and during project.
  • Provides guidance and leadership during gathering of information from community, and development, implementation and dissemination of the plan to the community
  • Continues with Project during subsequent funding to provide leadership
focus groups
Focus Groups
  • Conducted to gather more information directly from community members
  • Four groups in each site: 2 all ages, 1 youth, and 1 elders.
  • Questions from TAB and Coalition and 2-3 discussion questions
  • 2 hours in duration, 8 participants, $20 each
overview of training
Overview of Training

Ceremonial tobacco use vs. habitual tobacco use

Strategies for teambuilding

Tobacco Initiatives in Indian Country

Stages of Change in and out of Indian Country

Tobacco Facts and Fallacies in Indian country

overview of training cont
Overview of Training cont.
  • Overview of AIAN Tobacco Surveys
  • Social Norm Strategies
  • ARS – Audience Response System
second phase
Second Phase
  • Goal: To continue the work established in the First Phase and add new levels of focus.
second phase1
Second Phase
  • Strategy 1: Maintenance of a community advisory coalition and expanded partners to guide development, field testing, and implementation efforts for all age groups and sectors in the American Indian Community regarding Tobacco Control.
second phase2
Second Phase
  • Strategy 2: Develop, refine, and implement age-specific culturally appropriate tobacco use interventions will reduce second hand smoke (SHS), reduce first time starts with tobacco, and increase cessation activities among American Indians.
second phase3
Second Phase
  • Strategy 3: Develop Native-specific anti-habitual tobacco use messages that can be used in public awareness campaigns to help initiate community members' consideration of new ideas, behavior, and actions.
second phase4
Second Phase
  • Strategy 4: QUITLINE and QUITNET (Native Adults) Determine cultural appropriateness and sensitivity of the proposed tobacco interventions, especially telephone counseling.
second phase5
Second Phase
  • Strategy 5: Policy is an essential component of a comprehensive Tobacco Control Movement as it creates environments and opportunities for new behaviors and actions.
successes
Successes
  • Sustainable Infrastructure for Tobacco Control Initiatives – Capacity-Building
  • Tribal and Native Tobacco Policy and Movement Training
  • Youth Intervention for Tobacco exposure reduction and cessation
colorado quitline
Colorado Quitline
  • Established a relationship for future work
  • Participated in cultural competency training…….
  • Critiqued Cultural Training
  • Established plan to improve cultural sensitivity training for providing support to American Indian callers.
challenges
Challenges
  • Lack of knowledge and experience in the American Indian tobacco control movement.
  • remedied by training and networking at regional Indian tobacco control leadership workshops and seminars.
challenges1
Challenges
  • Continued competition for the attention of Indian people who smoke.
  • remedied by interventions that are fun and based on some traditional beliefs and practices.
challenges2
Challenges
  • Ute Mountain Ute Tribe – Working with a tribal nation yielded several challenges that continue to be addressed including:
challenges3
Challenges
  • Lack of support for the program – Low priority in relationship to other efforts related to education, employment, health, tribal business, etc.
  • Lack of internal stability and coordination with tribal program leadership changes and facility limitations.
challenges4
Challenges
  • Lack of participation in the advisory council by tribal program representatives and leaders.
responses
Responses
  • The NATE staff at both locations worked to recruit and keep participants in the Ute Advisory Council to provide leadership and support to the program.
responses1
Responses

Actions taken:

  • The NATE Program worked to take the Advisory Council members including a Ute Mountain Ute Tribal council person to training with other Tribes and Indian people to uplift the issue and educate them on what other tribes are doing and how their efforts can help their community.
responses2
Responses
  • NATE staff raised the issue of changing and limited office space to the Tribe on many occasions.
results
Results
  • NATE staff in Denver provided on-going training to the Ute Mountain Ute staff on the ARS, tobacco control issues, and other topics to support the program in their efforts to get the community involved and participating in the program.
results1
Results
  • The NATE staff in Ute Mountain Ute now has a permanent office and is housed in the Substance Abuse Program.
future activities
Future Activities…
  • Sustain Advisory Council
  • Pilot and implement Youth Intervention
  • Promote SHS Reduction and Prevention Strategies including personal policy development
  • Work with Quitline-established cessation program
  • Create culturally sensitive media
slide39

Preliminary NATE “Survey” findings

  • Survey Items Evolved from:
    • CO TAB instrument
    • Native American Tobacco Prevention Network (survey tools)
    • National Health Interview Survey (2 items)
    • California Health Interview Survey
    • 4 National Cancer Institute Native tobacco surveys
    • NATE Coalition Guidance
slide40

Preliminary NATE “Survey” findings

  • Includes NATE Coalition and focus group (FG) data from both Denver and Ute Mountain Ute Tribe (FG still in process)
  • Different numbers of responses on selected items as the items were refined to be culturally acceptable to the Native community members
  • Administered via ARS
slide41

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” findings

  • “Preliminary Data” Comprise total of
    • 52 Denver Natives
    • 25 Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Members
  • Examples of demographics:
    • ~41% males
    • ~59% females

Typical tobacco survey breakout in Indian Country is ~75% respondents are female

slide42

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Demographics

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Gender

N=52 answered the item

21 males (40.4%)

31 females (59%)

N=21 answered the item

8 males (30.3%)

13 females (60.7%)

slide43

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Demographics

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

American Indians

52 (n=53; 98.1%)

15 (n=17;88%)

The number of people who answered the item

slide44

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Demographics

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

High school or less education

27 (n=53; 50.9%)

15 (n=17;88%)

slide45

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Demographics

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Primarily raised on reservation

9 (n=29; 31%)

17 (n= ; 62.4%)

slide46

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Use tobacco for ceremonies

24 (n=36; 52.2%)

8 (n=23; 35.4%)

slide47

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Not smoke at all

27 (n=44; 61.4%)

13 (n=23; 55%)

slide48

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Yes, smoke when drink alcohol

17 (n=45; 37.8%)

11 (n=24; 47.8%)

slide49

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Not use chew at all

41 (n=45; 91.10%)

26 (n=26; 100%)

slide50

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Never allow smoking in home

30 (n=36; 83.3%)

18 (n=26; 67.5%)

Allow smoking in home only for special people

1 (n=36; 2.8%)

4 (n=26; 16.3%)

slide51

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

No habitual smoking in home at any age

21 (n=45; 46.7%)

12 (n=27; 43.5%)

slide52

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Behaviors

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

No smoking or chewing in home <18 years

22 (n=45; 48.9%)

11 (n=27; 40.6%)

slide53

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” NHIS

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Yes, always wear seat belt

29 (n=45; 64.4%)

16 (n=25; 63.3%)

Strong correlation between consistent seat belt use and likelihood of adhering to tobacco cessation

slide54

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Cessation

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Culturally Appropriate Tobacco Quit Programs

(“none”, “none that I know of”, “don’t know”)

30 (n=37; 81.1%)

22 (n=22; 100%)

slide55

Examples of Preliminary NATE “Survey” Tobacco Cessation

Denver

Ute Mt. Ute

Yes, I’ve heard of CO Quitline / Quitnet

27 (n=45; 60%)

18 (n=30; 57.5%)

slide56

What is NATE?

NATE is the Native American Tobacco Education Project. It is a community-based initiative to raise awareness in the Denver American Indian community about tobacco.

NATE Staff

Lisa Harjo, MA [Choctaw]

Terri Rattler [Oglala Lakota]

Rose Lee [Navajo]

Linda Burhansstipanov [Cherokee]

Native American Cancer Research

1835 Franklin Street

Denver, CO 80218

phone: 303-837-8137

fax: 303-837-7115

Native Cancer Survivors' Support Network: 1-800-537-8295

web page: http://www.NatAmCancer.org

email: NatAmLisaH@aol.com

Respect

Tobacco

The NATE project is coordinated through Native American Cancer Research (NACR). It is funded through a grant from Colorado’s State Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership (STEPP)

Denver, Colorado

September 2006

Youth / Children

slide57

Focus Groups and Surveys

NATE conducted a series of Focus Groups and surveys in the Denver Metro Area with American Indian people of all ages during the Spring and Summer of 2006 to learn more about attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors related to tobacco.

  • 12% of youth use tobacco with alcohol two times a week or less
  • 25% of youth were exposed to second hand smoke in their home

Based on the responses of the American Indians who participated in the Focus Groups and surveys:

  • 41% first tried tobacco between 14 and 16 years of age
  • 68% were introduced to tobacco by their friends or peers
  • 33% began using tobacco habitually before 20 years of age
  • 57% believe that enforcement for minors is not adequate
  • 87% believe that store owners should have a license to sell tobacco
  • 62% of youth believe that enforcement for minors is not adequate
  • 13% of youth currently smoke tobacco daily
  • What they said
  • “I thought it was cool … every movie you went to, someone was blowing smoke … it looked sophisticated.”
  • “My boyfriend got me to smoke. He was always smoking cigarettes and he said come on, smoke a cigarette… So, I smoked a cigarette. Now I’m hooked.”
  • “Our coach used to smoke … Wow, a coach is smoking and this guy is athletic and everything.”

Who Participated?

59 American Indians who reside in Denver, CO

40% males

60% females

What we Learned from our Community

slide58

What is NATE?

NATE is the Native American Tobacco Education Project. It is a community-based initiative to raise awareness in the Denver American Indian community about tobacco.

NATE Staff

Lisa Harjo, MA [Choctaw]

Terri Rattler [Oglala Lakota]

Rose Lee [Navajo]

Linda Burhansstipanov [Cherokee]

Native American Cancer Research

1835 Franklin Street

Denver, CO 80218

phone: 303-837-8137

fax: 303-837-7115

Native Cancer Survivors' Support Network: 1-800-537-8295

web page: http://www.NatAmCancer.org

email: NatAmLisaH@aol.com

The NATE project is coordinated through Native American Cancer Research (NACR). It is funded through a grant from Colorado’s State Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership (STEPP)

Respect

Tobacco

Ceremonial Use

Denver, Colorado

September 2006

slide59

Focus Groups and Surveys

NATE conducted a series of Focus Groups and surveys in the Denver Metro Area with American Indian people of all ages during the Spring and Summer of 2006 to learn more about attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors related to tobacco.

Based on the responses of the American Indians who participated in the Focus Groups and surveys:

  • 60% use tobacco for ceremonial purposes
  • 45% use traditional, non-commercial tobacco for ceremonial purposes
  • Over 50% of American Indians use both traditional tobacco and commercially prepared tobacco for ceremonial purposes
  • 47% use tobacco for non-ceremonial purposes

Who Participated?

59 American Indians who reside in Denver, CO

40% males

60% females

What we Learned from our Community

How is Traditional Tobacco Used?

  • For healing with headaches, fevers, chills, earaches and other illnesses
  • For pain relief from childbirth pains, headaches, and toothaches
  • For relief from symptoms of asthma, stomach aches, and rheumatism
  • As a remedy for wounds
  • As a bug repellant
  • To honor and welcome guests
  • To communicate with the Creator
  • To bind agreements
  • To bless events, buildings, homes, and people
slide60

What is NATE?

NATE is the Native American Tobacco Education Project. It is a community-based initiative to raise awareness in the Denver American Indian community about tobacco.

NATE Staff

Lisa Harjo, MA [Choctaw]

Terri Rattler [Oglala Lakota]

Rose Lee [Navajo]

Linda Burhansstipanov [Cherokee]

Native American Cancer Research

1835 Franklin Street

Denver, CO 80218

phone: 303-837-8137

fax: 303-837-7115

Native Cancer Survivors' Support Network: 1-800-537-8295

web page: http://www.NatAmCancer.org

email: NatAmLisaH@aol.com

Respect

Tobacco

General Information

The NATE project is coordinated through Native American Cancer Research (NACR). It is funded through a grant from Colorado’s State Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership (STEPP)

Denver, Colorado

September 2006

slide61

Focus Groups and Surveys

NATE conducted a series of Focus Groups and surveys in the Denver Metro Area with American Indian people of all ages during the Spring and Summer of 2006 to learn more about attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors related to tobacco.

Based on the responses of the American Indians who participated in the Focus Groups and surveys:

  • 41% currently smoke cigarettes
  • 6% currently chew tobacco
  • 38% smoke tobacco when they drink alcohol
  • 58% have smoked more than 100 cigarettes in their life
  • 41% first tried tobacco between 14 and 16 years of age
  • 68% were introduced to tobacco by their friends or peers
  • % began using tobacco habitually before 20 years of age

Who Participated?

59 American Indians who reside in Denver, CO

40% males

60% females

What we Learned from our Community

  • 60% use tobacco for ceremonial purposes
  • 45% use traditional, non-commercial tobacco for ceremonies
  • 18% allow smoking in their home
  • 26% stated a desire to quit smoking
  • 57% believe that enforcement for minors is not adequate
  • 87% believe that store owners should have a license to sell tobacco

What people said

  • “I don’t think Indians want to quit smoking”
  • “I think tobacco isn’t a risk for us (American Indians) because it was a gift to us from the Creator
slide62

What is NATE?

NATE is the Native American Tobacco Education Project. It is a community-based initiative to raise awareness in the Denver American Indian community about tobacco.

NATE Staff

Lisa Harjo, MA [Choctaw]

Terri Rattler [Oglala Lakota]

Rose Lee [Navajo]

Linda Burhansstipanov [Cherokee]

Native American Cancer Research

1835 Franklin Street

Denver, CO 80218

phone: 303-837-8137

fax: 303-837-7115

Native Cancer Survivors' Support Network: 1-800-537-8295

web page: http://www.NatAmCancer.org

email: NatAmLisaH@aol.com

Respect

Tobacco

Quitting

The NATE project is coordinated through Native American Cancer Research (NACR). It is funded through a grant from Colorado’s State Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership (STEPP)

Denver, Colorado

September 2006

slide63

Focus Groups and Surveys

NATE conducted a series of Focus Groups and surveys in the Denver Metro Area with American Indian people of all ages during the Spring and Summer of 2006 to learn more about attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors related to tobacco.

Based on the responses of the American Indians who participated in the Focus Groups and surveys:

  • 64% were not aware of tobacco quitting programs in the Denver American Indian community
  • 60% had heard of the Quitline or Quitnet (1-800-639-QUIT) or http://co.quitnet.com
  • 91% have never contact the Quitline or Quitnet
  • 26% stated that they would like to quit using tobacco in the next six months
  • 97% were aware of the harm second hand smoke can cause to children and youth, homes, and people
  • 41% currently smoke cigarettes
  • 6% currently chew tobacco
  • 38% smoke tobacco when they drink alcohol
  • 58% have smoked more than 100 cigarettes in their life
  • 26% stated a desire to quit smoking
  • 18% would use the Cold Turkey method of quitting without help or counseling
  • 33% began using tobacco habitually before 20 years of age

Who Participated?

59 American Indians who reside in Denver, CO

40% males

60% females

What we Learned from our Community

slide64

Pregnant females who smoke increase their chances of having a low birth weight baby by up to 39%

CO Quitline “Tobacco Use in Colorado” fact sheet, October 2001

Low birth weight may cause stillbirths and newborn deaths.

CO Quitline “Tobacco Use in Colorado” fact sheet, October 2001

Smoking during pregnancy “Facts”

slide65

Within 20 minutes of quitting, blood pressure and pulse rate decrease.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Within 8 hours of quitting, carbon monoxide and oxygen levels in the blood return to normal.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Within 1 day of quitting, the likelhood of heart attack decreases.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Benefits of Quitting “Facts”

slide66

Within 2 days of quitting, nerve endings regenerate; sense of smell and taste improve.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Within 2 weeks, circulation improves and lug function increases.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

After quitting for 1-9 months, coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue and shortness of breath decrease.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Benefits of Quitting “Facts”

slide67

Within 1 year of quitting, the likelihood of heart attack is cut in half.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Within 5 years of quitting stroke risk is reduced to the same levels as a non-smoker..

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Benefits of Quitting “Facts”

slide68

Within 10 years of quitting, risk of dying from lung cancer is about half that of a current smoker.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Within 15 years of quitting, risk of coronary heart disease and death become roughly equivalent to those who have never smoked.

Most Smokers regret the day they started smoking. CO Quitline 1-800-639-QUIT or http://co.quitnet.com

Benefits of Quitting “Facts”