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Module 5 Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth PowerPoint Presentation
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Module 5 Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Module 5 Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth
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  1. Module 5 Impact of Domestic Violenceon Children & Youth This curriculum is intended to be a tool to assist domestic violence service providers offering victim services (such as those outlined in California Penal Code §13823.15-13823.16) for the purpose of ensuring advocates working with survivors meet the requirements of a “Domestic Violence Counselor” pursuant to Evidence Code §1037.1(a)(1).

  2. Objectives • To understand the dynamics of families living with violence. • To understand the effects of domestic violence on children. • To review some services for children who have been exposed to domestic violence. Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 2

  3. “Families under stress produce children under stress….” (Ackerman and Pickering, 1989) Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 3

  4. Video First Impressions… Exposure to Violence and a Child’s Developing Brain (California Attorney General’s Office, 2008) Window of Opportunity… Reducing Children’s Exposure to Violence (California Attorney General’s Office, 2008) Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 4

  5. The Continuum of Exposure Seriousinjuries Fatal assaults Physical assaults Threats of homicideor suicide Weapons threats Severity of violence Highly controlling behavior Threats, intimidation Destruction of property Marital conflict, arguing, yelling Number of children Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 5

  6. Child Nurturing Wheel Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 6

  7. Child Abuse Wheel Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 7

  8. Paper Doll Activity Call out things that someone might say to a child that are denigrating. Each time something denigrating is said, tear off a piece of your doll. Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 8

  9. Statistics: Children Exposed to Domestic Violence Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 9

  10. Children and Domestic Violence The UN Secretary-General’s Study on Violence Against Children conservatively estimates that 275 million children worldwide are exposed to violence in the home. (Futures Without Violence, The facts on Children and Domestic Violence, 2008) Witnessing violence between one’s parents or caretakers is the strongest risk factor of transmitting violent behavior from one generation to the next. ( National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Domestic Violence Facts, 2007) Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 10

  11. Children and Domestic Violence The maltreatment of children and violence against women often go hand in hand. As many as half a million children may be encountered by police during domestic violence arrests each year. There is an overlap of 30 to 60 percent between violence against children and violence against women in the same families. (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (November 2000). Safe from the start: taking action on children exposed to violence. (Publication No. NCJ182789) Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Available: phone: 800-851-3420 or www.ncjrs.org/puborder) Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 11

  12. Children and Domestic Violence Children who experience childhood trauma, including witnessing incidents of domestic violence, are at a greater risk of having serious adult health problems including tobacco use, substance abuse, obesity, cancer, heart disease, depression and a higher risk for unintended pregnancy. (Futures Without Violence, The facts on Children and Domestic Violence, 2008) Physical abuse during childhood increases the risk of future victimization among women and the risk of future perpetration of abuse by men more than two-fold. (Futures Without Violence, The facts on Children and Domestic Violence, 2008) Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 12

  13. Children Who Witness Domestic Violence: Influencing Factors Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 13

  14. Influencing Factors for Children • Gender • Age • Support from a Constant Significant Adult • Frequency • Severity • Proximity • Disposition of Child Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 14

  15. Challenges for Children May be: • Social • Emotional • Psychological • Behavioral • Physical Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 15

  16. What Do We See By Age? • Prenatally • Infants and Toddlers • Childhood • Teen Years Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 16

  17. Prenatal Challenges Direct fetal injury Late prenatal care Pre-term labor Placental abruption Exposure to substance abuse alcohol/tobacco Low birth weight Vomiting Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 17

  18. Infant/Toddler Challenges: Behavioral Eating Problems Failure to Thrive Bedwetting and Nightmares Acting out/ out of Control behavior Withdrawal/ Passive Excessive Attention Seeking Manipulation, Dependency, Mood Swings Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 18

  19. Infant/Toddler Challenges: Emotional/Psychological • Difficulty Sleeping • Shame, Guilt, and Self-Blame • Confusion about Conflicting Feelings Towards Parents • Fear of abandonment • Anger Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 19

  20. Infant/Toddler Challenges: Social Attachment Problems Lack of responsiveness Poor anger management and problem solving skills Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 20

  21. Infant/Toddler Challenges: Physical Developmental Disabilities Language Delay Injuries When “Caught in the Crossfire” Short Attention Span Tired and Lethargic Frequently Ill Poor Personal Hygiene High Risk Play Self Abuse Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 21

  22. Childhood Challenges: Behavior • School Failure • Absenteeism • Bed Wetting and Nightmares • Parentification • Violence/ Aggression • Acting out or withdrawing • Out of Control Behavior • Lying to avoid confrontation Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 22

  23. Childhood Challenges: Emotional/ Psychological • Depression • Shame, guilt, and self blame • Confusion about conflicting feelings towards parents • Anger • Feelings of helplessness and powerlessness • Embarrassment Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 23

  24. Childhood Challenges: Social • Inadequate social skill development • Extreme separation anxiety • Isolation from friends and relatives • Difficulty in trusting, especially adults • Poor anger management and problem solving skills • Passivity with peers, or bullying Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 24

  25. Childhood Challenges: Physical • Frequently Ill • Somatic Complaints, headaches and stomachaches • Nervous, anxious, short attention span • Tired and lethargic • Poor personal hygiene • Regression in development • High risk play • Self abuse Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 25

  26. Teenage Challenges: Behavior • School Failure • Absenteeism • Substance Abuse • Parentification • Runaway • Acting Out/ Violence • Lying to Avoid Confrontation • Rigid Defenses • Manipulation, Dependency, Mood Swings Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 26

  27. Teenage Challenges: Emotional/ Psychological • Grief • Depression • Suicide Ideation • Shame, Guilt, and Self Blame • Confusion About Conflicting Feelings Towards Parents • Anger • Embarrassment Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 27

  28. Teenage Challenges: Social • Anti-Social Behavior • Dating Violence • Attachment Problems • Stormy Relationships • Difficulty in Trusting • Poor Anger Management and Problem Solving Skills • Passivity with Peers or Bullying Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 28

  29. Teenage Challenges: Physical • Somatic Complaints • Frequently Ill • Nervous, Anxious, Short Attention Span • Tired and Lethargic • Poor Personal Hygiene • Self Abuse Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 29

  30. Audio Clip: Children who Witness Domestic Violence Emergency 911 Call: Lisa http://www.ncdsv.org/audio/Lisa.mp3 Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 30

  31. Emergency Call Activity As a group, list the concerning events included in the clip, especially those which relate to the children. Discuss. Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 31

  32. How to Help… Children and Families Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 32

  33. Responding to Children Who Have Witnessed Domestic Violence PROVIDE: • Love and Care • Trust and Respect • Emotional Security • Physical Security • Discipline • Time • Encouragement and Support • Affection • Care for Yourself Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 33

  34. Connecting with Children Who Have Witnessed Domestic Violence • Frequently remind the child that the violence is not their fault, and there is nothing they could have done to prevent it • Avoid making negative statements about the batterer. • Provide support, encouragement, and patience • Pay attention to nonverbal communication • Model appropriate behavior by talking about your feelings and labeling them • Help them to identify coping skills • Use language which focuses on the child, not your opinion of the child. Instead of saying “I’m proud of you” say “You’re doing great.” Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 34

  35. How to Help Families • Use the empowerment model • Use family centered approaches Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 35

  36. Safety Planning with Children Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 36

  37. What to Take Activity Pretend that you are in an unsafe home, and have only five minutes to gather your belongings before leaving. Consider the 20 items listed on your worksheet, and rank them based on level of importance (1 = the most important item to take with you, and 20 = the least important item). Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 37

  38. Resources Module 5 •Impact of Domestic Violence on Children & Youth •Published 2012 •Slide 38

  39. This project was supported by Grant Number G-1101CAFVPS from the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) through the California Emergency Management Agency (Cal EMA). The opinions, findings, and conclusions in this publication are those of the author and not necessarily those of HHS nor Cal EMA. Cal EMA reserves a royalty-free, nonexclusive, and irrevocable license to reproduce, publish, and use these materials and to authorize others to do so.