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Introduction to AP World History. Time Periods Themes Habits of Mind Studying Smart Taking Notes Reading your Text. Time periods. 8,000 BCE – 600 CE: Foundations of Civilization 600 CE – 1450 CE: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter

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introduction to ap world history
Introduction to AP World History

Time Periods

Themes

Habits of Mind

Studying Smart

Taking Notes

Reading your Text

time periods
Time periods
  • 8,000 BCE – 600 CE: Foundations of Civilization
  • 600 CE – 1450 CE: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter
  • 1450 CE – 1750 CE: Emergence of the First Global Age
  • 1750 CE – 1914 CE: The Age of Revolutions and Empires
  • 1914 CE – Present: A Technological Age
the six themes of ap world history
The Six Themes of AP World History

1.Impact of interaction among major societies (trade, systems of international exchange, war and diplomacy).

Buddha wearing a Roman toga? How did this happen???

the six themes of ap world history1
The Six Themes of AP World History

2. The relationship of change and continuity across the world history periods covered in this course.

the six themes of ap world history2
The Six Themes of AP World History

3. Impact of technology and demography on people and the environment (population growth and decline, disease, manufacturing, migrations, agriculture, weaponry).

the six themes of ap world history3
The Six Themes of AP World History

4. Systems of social structure and gender structure (comparing major features within and among societies and assessing change).

the six themes of ap world history4
The Six Themes of AP World History

5. Cultural and intellectual developments and interactions among and within societies

Pages from the Selected Teachings of Buddhist Sages and Son Masters (PulchoChikchiSimch’eYoyol), the earliest extant book printed with movable metal type, dated 1377, Hungdok-sa Temple, Korea (BibliothèqueNationale de Paris; Koreana 7, no. 2, 20-21).

the six themes of ap world history5
The Six Themes of AP World History

6. Changes in functions and structures of states and attitudes toward states and political identities (political culture), including the emergence of the nation-state (types of political organization).

habits of mind
Habits of Mind

Constructing and evaluating arguments.

habits of mind1
Habits of Mind

Using documents and other primary data

“I am the punishment of God...If you had not committed great sins, God would not have sent a punishment like me upon you.” - Gehghis Khan

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Habits of Mind

Assessing issues of change and continuity

habits of mind3
Habits of Mind

Handling diversity of interpretations

habits of mind4
Habits of Mind

Seeing global patterns in time and space

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Habits of Mind

Comparing within and among societies

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Habits of Mind

Assessing claims of universal standards

learning styles
Learning Styles
  • Visual (spatial)You prefer using pictures, images, and spatial understanding.
  • Aural (auditory-musical) You prefer using sound and music.
  • Verbal (linguistic) You prefer using words, both in speech and writing.
  • Physical (kinesthetic) You prefer using your body, hands and sense of touch.
  • Logical (mathematical)You prefer using logic, reasoning and systems.
  • Social (interpersonal) You prefer to learn in groups or with other people.
  • Solitary (intrapersonal) You prefer to work alone and use self-study.
learning strategies don t study all the time study smart
Learning Strategies: Don’t study ALL THE TIME; Study SMART
  • #1 Your brain can hold seven items of information, plus or minus two items in working memory
learning strategies don t study all the time study smart1
Learning Strategies: Don’t study ALL THE TIME; Study SMART
  • #2 The addition of emotion can help you remember.
  • Can you make a story or a song out of what you are studying? You are more likely to remember it!
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Learning Strategies: Don’t study ALL THE TIME; Study SMART
  • #3 The brain is SOCIAL and requires interaction to develop properly.
    • Don’t lock yourself in your dorm all night to study!
    • Can you teach something to a friend and then have them explain it to you? If you have to teach something, you really learn it!
learning strategies don t study all the time study smart3
Learning Strategies: Don’t study ALL THE TIME; Study SMART
  • #4 Practice/Rehearsal is critical to learning for the long-term.
  • Sooooo….you want to take the WHAP test May 2011? Don’t cram for your tests the night before you take them. Learn for the long-term.
  • Can you tell stories?
  • Can you draw maps?
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Learning Strategies: Don’t study ALL THE TIME; Study SMART
  • #5 We take in more information visually than through any other sense
  • Use charts, graphs, and write stuff down and look at it.
  • You can ask a friend for notes, but you will learn more effectively if you take your own notes.
how to read your textbook
How to read your textbook
  • Survey the chapter:
    • Look at the titles, heading, subheadings
    • What are you reading for?
    • What questions have you been asked on your study guide?
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How to read your textbook
  • Question:
    • Ask yourself, “What do I already know about this subject?”
    • Read questions at the end of the chapter and make sure that you can answer them.
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How to read your textbook
  • Read:
    • Look for answers
    • Read captions under pictures and graphs and charts and data
    • Reduce your speed for difficult passages
    • Look up words that you don’t know
      • **BUILD YOUR SAT VOCABULARY!!!***
    • Only read one section at a time and make sure you understand what you are reading
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How to read your textbook
  • Recite
    • Orally ask yourself questions about what you have read
    • Take notes from the book in your own words
    • Write down p. #s on your study guide so you can go back to the information later
    • Triple Strength Learning: See, Say, Hear
    • Quadruple Strength Learning: See, Say, Hear, WRITE!
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How to read your textbook
  • Review
    • If you don’t understand something, make a question so you can ask your teacher in class.
    • Can you answer the question on the study guide without looking at the answer you have written?
    • Use connecting maps (especially with people or events in history)
why should you take notes
Why should you take notes?

To minimize your “rate of forgetting”

Dr. Walter Pauk, Cornell University

Don’t take notes = Forget 60% in 14 days

Take some notes = Remember 60%

Take organized notes and do something

with them = Remember 90-100% indefinitely!

“Remember, the questioner is the learner.”

Dr. Walter Pauk – Director, Reading and Study Center – Cornell University

the forgetting curve
The Forgetting Curve

Counseling Services, Study Skills Program – University of Waterloo

what does the research show
What Does the Research Show?
  • Verbatim note-taking is, perhaps, the least effective way to take notes.
  • Notes should be considered a work in progress.
  • Notes should be used as study guides for tests.
  • The more notes that are taken, the better.

Marzano, et al. Classroom Instruction that Works. 2001.

what does the research show1
What Does the Research Show?
  • Students must analyze information at a deep level in order to decide what information to delete, what to substitute, and what to keep when they are asked to give a summary.(Anderson, V., & Hidi, 1988/1989; Hidi & Anderson, 1987)
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What Does the Research Show?
  • Reading comprehension increases when students learn how to incorporate “summary frames” as a tool for summarizing.(Meyer & Freedle, 1984)

Summary frames are a series of questions created by the teacher and designed to highlight critical passages of text. When students use this strategy, they are better able to understand what they are reading, identify key information, and provide a summary that helps them retain the information.(Armbruster, Anderson, & Ostertag, 1987)

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What Does the Research Show?
  • When students review and revise their own notes, the notes become more meaningful and useful.(Anderson & Armbruster, 1986; Denner 1986; Einstein, Morris & Smith, 1985)
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