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HACCP: Why We Are Doing What We Are Doing?. Angela M. Fraser, Ph.D. Associate Professor/Food Safety Specialist Clemson University. Why HACCP?. Because I said so!. Child Nutrition Reauthorization 2004. Require HACCP Plan based on process HACCP principles. What is HACCP?

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HACCP: Why We Are Doing What We Are Doing?


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    1. HACCP: Why We Are Doing What We Are Doing? Angela M. Fraser, Ph.D. Associate Professor/Food Safety Specialist Clemson University SIFT -- 2010

    2. Why HACCP? Because I said so! SIFT -- 2010

    3. Child Nutrition Reauthorization 2004 • Require HACCP Plan based on process HACCP principles. • What is HACCP? • Hazard Analysis – analyze menu to determine what foodborne pathogens most likely to contaminate food • Critical Control Points – identify ways to eliminate or reduce (control strategies) SIFT -- 2010

    4. South Carolina HACCP Plan • HACCP Plan based on controlling foodborne bacteria and viral agents. • 40% foodborne illness attributed to Norovirus. • 23% not known but believed to be due to viruses. • Control strategies for viruses different than for bacteria. • Temperature control – bacteria • Hygiene and sanitation -- viruses SIFT -- 2010

    5. Four Process Categories • Potentially hazardous food • pH above 4.6 • Moist • Some protein • Examples: animal foods, heat-treated plant products, pre-cut/peeled vegetables • Non-potentially hazardous food • Examples: breads, whole fruits, most condiments SIFT -- 2010

    6. Bacterial Growth • Bacteria requires: • Right food (potentially hazardous food) • Right conditions (warm temperatures + time) • Growth rates: • 90-110 degrees F – about every 30-60 minutes • 70 degrees F – about every two hours • When do you finish cooking food? • When do you serve it? SIFT -- 2010

    7. Key Control Strategies • Temperature Control • Receiving to Leftovers • Cooling Foods • Leftovers • Complex Foods • No Bare Hand Contact • Exposed (unpackaged) ready-to-eat food SIFT -- 2010

    8. Temperature Control • Calibration • Thermometers checked each day. • Record observation on Thermometer Calibration Log. • Receiving • Check potentially hazardous foods with infrared thermometer. • Note problems directly on invoice. • Storage • Dry Storeroom – check daily. • Cold Storage – check seven days/week. SIFT -- 2010

    9. Temperature Control • Cook All at Once • Check temperatures of each pan in two locations. • Record lowest “safe” temperature. • Cook Pot of Food • Check temperature in two locations. • Record lowest “safe” temperature. • Batch Cooking • Check temperature of all batches in two locations. • Record lowest “safe” temperature of first batch. SIFT -- 2010

    10. Temperature Control • Hot-holding Unit • Check temperature before put on serving line. • If not correct, reheat and note reheat on Daily Production Record under comments • Serving Line • Do not need to check temperature while on serving line. • Foods can be in temperature danger zone for up to four hours without bacterial growth. SIFT -- 2010

    11. Leftovers • Self-service • All exposed foods thrown out regardless of whether potentially hazardous or non-potentially hazardous • Packaged foods at proper temperatures can be saved. • Serving Line • If potentially hazardous, check temperature. • If safe temperature, cool and save for three days. • Prepared but in hot-holding unit • If potentially hazardous, check temperature. • If safe temperature, freeze and save one menu cycle. SIFT -- 2010

    12. Cooling • Complex Foods • Prepare early in the day so can check temperature. • Monitor temperature every hour. • Record on Complex Foods Cooling Log • Leftovers • Minimize leftovers • Divide into smaller amounts • Cool, label, check temperature before leave. SIFT -- 2010

    13. No Bare Hand Contact • Illness Statistics • 40% foodborne illness caused by Norovirus • 23% believed to be caused by viruses. • 85% of Norovirus cases due to food handlers • No bare hand contact • Exposed (unpackaged) ready-to-eat food • Handwashing often done improperly so not always effective control strategy. SIFT -- 2010

    14. Thank you! Any Questions? SIFT -- 2010