Learning from Video Games: Designing Digital Curriculums - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

jana
learning from video games designing digital curriculums l.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Learning from Video Games: Designing Digital Curriculums PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Learning from Video Games: Designing Digital Curriculums

play fullscreen
1 / 24
Download Presentation
Learning from Video Games: Designing Digital Curriculums
418 Views
Download Presentation

Learning from Video Games: Designing Digital Curriculums

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Learning from Video Games: Designing Digital Curriculums Eileen McMahon, Ed.M. Asgedet Stefanos, Ed.D. UMass Boston 13th Sloan-C Orlando,FL November 9, 2007

  2. Introduction • The researched benefits of video games/computer games support the fact that video games are models for digital curriculum • Video games engage a wide variety of intelligences and learning styles • Design principles can be gleaned from video games and applied to the development of digital curriculm.

  3. Multiple Intelligences Framework Interpersonal Self smart Linguistic Word smart Interpersonal People smart Musical Music smart Bodily-Kinesthetic Body smart Spatial Picture smart Logical MathematicalLogical smart Linguisitic Word smart Theory developed by Howard Gardner

  4. Logical/Mathematical

  5. Logical/Mathematical (cont’d)

  6. Musical

  7. Bodily/Kinesthetic

  8. Spatial

  9. Spatial (cont’d)

  10. Interpersonal

  11. Interpersonal (cont’d)

  12. Interpersonal (cont’d)

  13. Intrapersonal

  14. Intrapersonal (cont’d)

  15. Intrapersonal (cont’d)

  16. Intrapersonal (cont’d)

  17. Naturalist

  18. Linguistic

  19. References • Parker, J. R. (2006). Cheating by video game participants. Proceedings of Canadian Game Study Association 2006 Symposium • Baranowski, T. Baranowski, J. Cullen, K; Marsh, T.; Islam, N. Zakeri, I.; Hones-Morreale, L. and Demoor, C. Squire's Quest! Dietary Outcome of Evaluation of a Multimedia Game. American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 14, 1, (2003), 52- 61. • Squire, K., & Barab Sasha. (2004). Replaying History: Engaging Urban Underserved Students in Learning World History Through Computer Simulation Games. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Learning Sciences, Santa Monica, Ca. 505. • Myriam, Desainte-Catherine, Jyorgy Kutag, Sylvian Marchand, Scrime, Katherine, Semal, University of Bordeaux 2, Pierre Hanna, Scrime. Playing with Sounds as Playing Video Games.Computers in Entertainment, 2(2)

  20. References (cont’d) 5. Greenfield, P. M. (1993). Representational Competence in Shared Symbol Systems: Electronic Media from Radio to Video Games. In R. R. Cocking, K. Rinnenger (Ed.), The Development and Meaning of Psychological Distance (pp. 161) Hillsdale, Erlbaum. 6. Greenfield, P. M. (1993). Representational Competence in Shared Symbol Systems: Electronic Media from Radio to Video Games. In R. R. Cocking, K. Rinnenger (Ed.), The Development and Meaning of Psychological Distance (pp. 161) Hillsdale, Erlbaum. 7. Green, C.S. , Bavelier, D. (2003). Action Video Games Modifies Visual Selective Attention. Nature, 534-537.

  21. References (cont’d) 8.Johnson D. Maruyuma; G. Johnson, R., Nelson D. and Skon, L. Effects on Cooperative, Competitive and Individualistic Goal Structures on Achievement: A Meta-Analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 89, 1(1981) , 47-62. 9. Inkpen, K., Upitis, R., Klawe, M., Lawry, J., Anderson, A., Ndunda, M., et al. (1994). “ We Have Never-Forgetful Flowers in Our Garden: "Girls’ Responses to Electronic Games. Technical Report by E-GEMS University of British Columbia Vancouver B.C. 1993. 10. Inkpen, K., Upitis, R., Klawe, M., Lawry, J., Anderson, A., Ndunda, M., et al. (1994). “We Have Never-Forgetful Flowers in Our Garden: " Girls’ Responses to Electronic Games. Technical Report by E-GEMS University of British Columbia Vancouver B.C. 1993

  22. References (cont’d) 11. Baranowski, T. Baranowski, J. Cullen, K; Marsh, T.; Islam, N. Zakeri, I.; Hones-Morreale, L. and Demoor, C. Squire's Quest. Dietary Outcome of Evaluation of a Multimedia Game. American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 14, 1, (2003) , 52- 61. 12. Denis, G., & Jouvelot, P. (2005). Motivation-driven Educational Game Design; Applying Best Practices to Music Education. Proceedings of the 2005 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology ACE '05, 462. 13. Lee, J., Luchini, K., Benjamin Michael, Cathie Norris, & Elliot Soloway. (2004). More Than Just Fun and Games: Assessing the Value of Educational Video Games in the Classroom. Vienna, Austria. 1375.

  23. References (cont’d) 14. Inkpen, K., Upitis, R., Klawe, M., Lawry, J., Anderson, A., Ndunda, M., et al. (1994). “ We Have Never-Forgetful Flowers in Our Garden: " Girls’ Responses to Electronic Games. Technical Report by E-GEMS University of British Columbia Vancouver B.C. 1993 15. Squire, K., & Barab Sasha. (2004). Replaying History: Engaging Urban Underserved Students in Learning World History Through Computer Simulation Games. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Learning Sciences, Santa Monica, Ca. 505.

  24. Contact info: Eileen McMahon Eileen.mcmahon@umb.edu Asgedet Stefanos Asgedet.Stefanos@umb.edu