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RESULTS OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS SURVEY July 2005 DFID’s Security, Justice and Growth Programme PowerPoint Presentation
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RESULTS OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS SURVEY July 2005 DFID’s Security, Justice and Growth Programme. Introduction. A Survey of public perception of the Rights of Women in Nigeria

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slide1

RESULTS OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS SURVEY

July 2005

DFID’s Security, Justice and Growth Programme

introduction
Introduction
  • A Survey of public perception of the Rights of Women in Nigeria
  • The study was initiated to develop monitoring and evaluation tools for the interventions initiated by DFID on promoting the Rights of Women
  • 2547 respondents from 18 states spread across the 6 geo-political zones (July 2005)
  • 59.6% were urban, 12.2% were semi urban and 28.2% were rural
  • 39% were Muslims, 27% Protestants (Evangelical and Pentecostal), 17% Catholics, 13% mainstream Protestants, 1% Independent African Church and 1% who indicated other faiths
  • Results broken down in reported data by: gender; social class; age; marital status, region; urbanisation; and religion
  • This PowerPoint are highlights only of the 46 tables produced of results of this survey of Rights of Women
purpose
Purpose

This presentation will:

  • Provide an insight into public perception of how some Women’s rights are being observed as of July 2005
  • Generate informed discussions and decisions on interventions and methodologies for promoting Women’s Rights both with our counterparts, other DFID programmes and SJG itself
composition of respondents
Composition of Respondents
  • 50% (1279) were male and approximately 50% (1268) were female
  • Household social class categories:
    • 5% were AB or upper class (earning between N5 to N10mln p.a. and are extremely wealth or top executives of major corporations and businesses)
    • 8% were C1 or upper middle class (earning up to N2mln p.a. and are senior management staff of big corporations and businesses – are mostly upwardly mobile professionals)
    • 23% were C2 or middle class (earning up to N0.6mln p.a. and are in supervisory and junior management positions)
    • The bulk of 64% were category D and E or lower class (earning N0.3mln p.a. or those without any regular source of income – some live in one room dwellings in relatively poor urban locations)
composition of respondents cont
Composition of Respondents (cont.)
  • 40% were single and 56% were married with 3% widowed and 1% separated
  • Age: 20% were 18-24; 30%, 25-30; 20%, 31-35; 10%, 36-40; 10%, 41-50; 10% over 50
  • Geographical distribution (six geo-political zones + Lagos):
    • Lagos 6%
    • South West 14%, Oyo, 9%; Ondo, 5%
    • South East 12%, Enugu, 3%; Anambra, 5%; Abia, 4%
    • South South 15%, Cross River, 5%; Edo, 5%; Rivers, 5%
    • North West 25%, Kano, 12%; Kaduna, 8%; Kebbi, 5%
    • North East 17%, Bauchi, 10%; Yobe, 3%; Plateau, 4%
    • North Central 11%, Benue, 5%; Niger, 5% and FCT/Abuja, 1%.
slide9
Were you married under the Marriage Act or only under Shari’ah or Traditional Marriage? (National only) July ‘05
actual suffered further analysis of significant variations from national
“Actual suffered” Further analysis of significant variations from National %
  • Widowhood rites: 6% nationally
    • 10% among separated; widowed, 15%; South West, 11%; South East, 18%; Rural 9%; Catholics, 11%
    • Lagos 3%; North West 1%, North East 3%, Muslims 2%
  • Denying women share of inheritance: 12% nationally
    • 14% among DE class; widowed, 18%; South East, 15%, North Central, 16%; South South, 19%, Catholics, 16%; Evangelicals, 14%
    • AB class, 7%; C1C2, 8%, Lagos 6%; North West, 6%; North East 8%; Muslims, 7%
  • Female circumcision/FGM: 8% nationally:
    • 11% among 41-51+ yrs; widowed, 14%; South West 23%, South South 11%; Catholic, 10%
    • Muslims 5%; AB class, 5%; North West 4%, North Central 4%, North East 2%
aware of practice in community further analysis of significant variations from national
“Aware of practice in community” Further analysis of significant variations from National %
  • Widowhood rites: 21% nationally
    • 30% among separated; widowed, 30%; South West, 32%; South East, 49%; Rural 9%; Catholics, 35%
    • Lagos 19%; North West 8%, North East 8%, Muslims 7%
  • Denying women share of inheritance: 27% nationally
    • Females, 30%; Widowed, 36%; South South, 41%; South East, 37%; South West, 34%; NorthCentral, 44%; Semi-urban, 31% Catholics, 37%; Evangelicals, 38%
    • AB class, 23%; Separated 20%; Lagos, 12%; North West, 16%; North East, 15%; Muslims, 16%
  • Female circumcision/FGM: 24% nationally:
    • Females, 28%; widowed, 28%; Lagos, 30%; South West 44%; South South 40%; South East 28%; Evangelicals, 32%, Protestants 30%, Catholic, 28%
    • Muslims 14%; Single 21%, North East 12%; North West, 15%; North Central 12%, Semi-urban 20%
slide15
“Perceived prevalence of acid attack and ritual murder” Further analysis of significant variations from National %
  • Acid Attacks: 43% nationally
    • 47% among females; separated, 55%, widowed, 54%; North Central, 59%; Rural 50%; Muslims, 53%
    • AB, 37%; Single, 37%; Lagos 25%; South South, 23%; South East 33%; South West 35%;
  • Ritual murder: 30% nationally
    • Females, 35%; separated, 55%; Widowed, 45%; North East 41%; North Central, 35%
    • Lagos, 14%; South South 22%
slide16
Have you been subjected to verbal and emotional abuse by your husband/wife in the last one year? July ‘05
slide20
Have you or anyone in your family or household been raped in the last one year? (National only) July ‘05
slide21
Has anybody attempted to rape you or a member of your family or household in the last one year? (National only) July ‘05
slide23
Have you or anyone in your family or household been forced (sent packing) from the matrimonial home? (National only) July ‘05
slide24

Is abandonment of wives & children without adequate means of subsistence prevalent in your local govt. area/ community? (National only) July ‘05

slide25

Is abandonment of wives & children without adequate means of subsistence prevalent in your local govt. area/community? Detailed analysis of significant variations from National %

  • Yes, national 27%
    • Females, 32%; Separated, 75%; Widowed, 34%
    • Males, 21%; AB class, 21%; Lagos, 22%; North East, 21%; North West, 22%; Muslim, 21%
slide26
Have you experienced intimidation or threats from any of the following in the past one year? (National only) July ‘05
is the incidence of wife beating or assault prevalent in your local govt area community july 05
Is the incidence of wife beating or assault prevalent in your local govt. area/ community? July ‘05
slide28

Is the incidence of wife beating or assault prevalent in your local govt. area/ community? July ’05Detailed analysis of significant variations from National %

  • Yes, 31% Nationally
    • Females, 36%; Separated, 55%; Widowed, 38%; South West, 42%; South South, 38%; Protestants, 41%; Catholics, 38%
    • Males, 26%; AB, 23%; North East, 21%; North West, 25%, Muslim, 21%
  • No,69% Nationally
is shari ah or customary law beneficial to women s rights july 05 maybe or no opinion next slide
Is Shari’ah or customary law beneficial to women’s rights? July ’05(maybe or no opinion next slide)
slide31
Is Shari’ah or customary law beneficial to women’s rights? Detailed analysis of significant variations from National %
  • Yes, 37% nationally
    • Males, 42%; North East, 59%; North West, 56%; Muslims, 66%
    • Females, 33%; Single, 31%; Separated, 30%; Widows, 32%; South West, 15%; South South, 19%; South East, 25%; North Central, 28%; Evangelicals, 17%, Catholics, 19%; Protestants, 19%
  • No opinion, 36% nationally
    • Widowed, 43%, South West, 58%; South South, 48%; North Central, 52%; Rural, 41%; Protestants, 47%; Evangelicals, 46%; Catholics, 45%
    • South East, 31%; North West, 27%; North East, 16%, Muslims, 22%
  • No, 16% nationally
    • Separated, 25%; South West, 21%, South East, 34%; North East, 21%; Evangelicals, 26%; Catholics, 22%, Protestants, 21%
    • Lagos 12%; South South 12%, North West, 8%; North Central, 8%; Semi-urban, 11%, Muslims, 4%
aspects of shari ah or customary law considered most beneficial to women national only july 05
Aspects of Shari’ah or Customary law considered most beneficial to women (National only) July ‘05
aspects of shari ah or customary law considered most beneficial to women national only july 0533
Aspects of Shari’ah or Customary law considered most beneficial to women, (National only) July ‘05
aspects of shari ah or customary law considered most beneficial to women national only july 0534
Aspects of Shari’ah or Customary law considered most beneficial to women, (National only) July‘05
aspects of shari ah or customary law considered most beneficial to women national only july 05 5
Aspects of Shari’ah or Customary law considered most beneficial to women (National only) July ’05<5%
  • Gives equal rights to women and men, 5%
  • Prevents adultery, 3%
  • Discourages divorce, 3%
  • Encourages female education, 3%
  • Encourages legal marriages, 3%
  • Prevents child abuse, 1%
  • Punish rapists, 1%
  • Others, 1%
reasons for not considering sharia or customary law beneficial to women national only july 05
Reasons for not considering Sharia or customary law beneficial to women, (National only) July ‘05
reasons for not considering shari ah or customary law beneficial to women national only july 05
Reasons for not considering Shari’ah or Customary law beneficial to women, (National only) July ‘05
reasons for not considering shari ah or customary law beneficial to women national only july 0538
Reasons for not considering Shari’ah or Customary law beneficial to women, (National only) July ‘05
reasons for not considering shari ah or customary law beneficial to women national only july 0539
Reasons for not considering Shari’ah or Customary law beneficial to women, (National only) July ‘05
reasons for not considering shari ah or customary law beneficial to women national only july 05 5
Reasons for not considering Shari’ah or Customary law beneficial to women , (National only) July ’05< 5%
  • Killing is forbidden, 3%
  • Harsh, unbearable punishments, 3%
  • Forced marriages, 3%
  • Denies women opportunity to participate in governance, 3%
  • High bride prices encourages marriages and makes women slaves, 2%
  • Discourages western education, 2%
  • It represses instead of being sympathetic, 1%
  • Causes underdevelopment, 1%
  • Imposed bride price, 1%
  • Forced widowhood rites, 1%
  • Other reasons, 3%
what do you perceive overall as a major problem for women in nigeria c national only july 05 5
What do you perceive overall as a major problem for women in Nigeria? C, (National only) July ’05<5%
  • Abuse of women, 4%
  • Women find it difficult to marry, 4%
  • Neglect of women in the society, 3%
  • Lack of respect for and disobedience of husbands, 3%
  • Too much interest in worldliness and material things, 2%
  • Burden of child care, 2%
  • Forced and early marriage, 1%
  • Problems of bareness, 1%
  • Sexual harassment, 1%
  • Laziness, 1%
  • Immorality, poor dress and etiquette, 1%
  • Unnecessary divorce, 1%
slide44
What do you perceive overall as a major problem for women in Nigeria? July ’05 Detailed analysis of significant variations from National %
  • Lack of opportunity to exercise rights –19% Nationally
    • Women, 21%; AB social class, 26%; North West, 25%, North Central, 32%
    • Males, 16%, Separated, 5%; Lagos, 1%; South East, 11%; South South, 10%; Catholics, 14%
  • Illiteracy and poor education – 12% Nationally
    • Separated, 20%; North West, 17%; North Central, 18%
    • AB, 8%; Widowed, 7%; Lagos, 6%; South West, 6%; South East, 7%; South South, 9%; Protestants, 8%
  • Gender inequality and discrimination – 11% Nationally
    • AB social class, 14%; Widowed, 18%; Lagos, 22%; South East, 32%; Catholics, 16%, Evangelicals, 15%
    • South West, 0%; North West, 4%; North Central, 3%; Semi-urban, 6%; Rural, 8%; Islamic, 5%
slide45
What do you perceive overall as a major problem for women in Nigeria? July ’05 Detailed analysis of significant variations from National %
  • Unemployment among women –9% Nationally
    • Widowed, 12%; Lagos, 31%; South West, 13%, North Central, 14%, Protestants, 15%
    • South East, 4%; South South, 6%; North East 5%
  • Lack of Money – 8% Nationally
    • Lagos, 16%; South West, 20%; Catholics, 16%, Evangelicals, 15%
    • AB class, 4%; C1C2 Class, 6%; North East 1%; Muslim 5%