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Injury / Illness and Accident Statistics. TM 650 Summer 2009 Dr. Carter J. Kerk. Reading Assignment. Asfahl Chapter 2 Appendices B, C, D, F. Accident Recordkeeping. “ You can’t manage what you don’t measure ”

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injury illness and accident statistics

Injury / Illness and Accident Statistics

TM 650

Summer 2009

Dr. Carter J. Kerk

reading assignment
Reading Assignment
  • Asfahl
    • Chapter 2
    • Appendices B, C, D, F
accident recordkeeping
Accident Recordkeeping
  • “You can’t manage what you don’t measure”
  • National Safety Council established the 1st national system of industrial safety recordkeeping - Z16.1- a voluntary system
  • OSHA established a similar mandatory system - OSHA Form 200 – updated to OSHA Form 300 for January 2002
  • New OSHA Recordkeeping Rule (see accompanying PowerPoint presentation)
the impact of osha on death and death rates
The Impact of OSHA on Death and Death Rates
  • What impact does OSHA’s appearance in the 1970’s appear to have?
  • Examine the next two graphs to determine the general impact of OSHA. What do you think?
frequency versus severity
Frequency versus Severity
  • Frequency
    • numbers of cases per standard quantity of work hours
  • Severity
    • impact of cases in terms of “lost workdays” per standard quantity of work hours
    • “Lost Workday” – cannot report for work at the next workday
      • Fatalities and permanent total disability incidents are not “lost workday” cases, because the worker never works again
    • Disability classes
      • temporary partial temporary total
      • permanent partial permanent total
an osha recordable injury illness
An OSHA Recordable Injury/Illness
  • All injuries or illnesses which require medical treatment, plus fatalities
  • Medical treatment does NOT include
    • simple first aid
    • preventative medicine (e.g. tetanus shots)
    • medical diagnostic procedures with negative results
    • Medical Treatment (Appendix B)
first aid
First Aid
  • “One-time” treatment and subsequent observation of minor scratches, cuts, burns, splinters, etc.
  • These are not considered medical treatment even if administered by a physician.
  • Appendix C of text
recordable injury
Recordable Injury
  • Regardless of treatment, if an injury involves
    • loss of consciousness
    • restriction of work or motion
    • transfer to another job
  • It is recordable!
  • An injury that receives (or should have received) medical treatment is almost always considered recordable
illness
Illness
  • Abnormal condition or disorder, not classified as an injury, caused by exposure to environmental factors associated with employment
  • usually associated with chronic exposures
incidence rate
Incidence Rate

IR = (# of injuries/illnesses including fatalities x 200,000) /

(total hours worked by all employees during the period covered)

200,000 = (40 hrs/wk) (50 wk/yr) (100 workers)

  • A 100 employee firm for 1 year
  • See next figure
slide15

Figure 2.2 from text. Comparison of incidence rates for various industries by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code. Private sector average is about 6 cases per 100 full-time workers. Grey scale does not show up on this slide. Industries shown are at the 2-digit SIC level. Lost workday cases plus cases without lost workdays equals total cases.

slide17

Appendix F: Partially Exempt Industries. Employers classified in the following SIC Codes are not required to keep general OSHA injury and illness records unless asked by OSHA, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), or an authorized state agency. Fatalities or workplace incidents that result in hospitalization of three or more employees must still be reported.

naics
NAICS
  • North American Industrial Classification System
    • US Census Bureau
    • http://www.census.gov/epcd/www/naics.html
  • Has replaced the SIC system
injury illness statistics
Injury / Illness Statistics
  • The following several charts present several aspects of injury / illness statistics
  • The data is almost exclusively from private industry.
  • Worker Health Chartbook, 2004. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-146.
incidence rates for lost workday cases of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses 1973 2001
Incidence rates for lost-workday cases of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses, 1973-2001
occupations with highest median days away from work due to occupational injuries or illnesses 2001
Occupations with highest median days away from work due to occupational injuries or illnesses, 2001
slide28
Distribution of occupational injury and illness cases with days away from work by nature of injury or illness, 2001
slide29
Median days away from work due to occupational injuries or illnesses by nature of injury or illness, 2001
distribution of occupational injury and illness cases with days away from work by body part 2001
Distribution of occupational injury and illness cases with days away from work by body part, 2001
slide32
Distribution of occupational injury and illness cases with days away from work by source of injury or illness, 2001
slide33
Distribution of occupational injury and illness cases with days away from work by event or exposure, 2001
resources
Resources
  • National Safety Council
    • Accident Facts, now Injury Facts
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)
  • Worker Health Chartbook, 2004. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-146.