sota theory of visual rhetoric in 1 st year comp classes suzanne webb february 27 2007 l.
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SOTA: THEORY OF VISUAL RHETORIC IN 1 ST YEAR COMP CLASSES Suzanne Webb February 27, 2007 PowerPoint Presentation
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SOTA: THEORY OF VISUAL RHETORIC IN 1 ST YEAR COMP CLASSES Suzanne Webb February 27, 2007.

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slide2

I will review the state of the art of theory of visual rhetoric in 1st-year comp classes and then, as part of this review, give you, my audience, a feel for what DRPW TAs are currently teaching in WRA writing courses at MSU.

slide7

LET THERE BE

COMMUNICATION

slide9

AND MAN SAW

THAT IT WAS GOOD

slide11

LET THERE BE

RHETORIC

slide13

AND MAN SAW

THAT IT WAS GOOD

slide16

RICH

WHITE

MEN

MAKING

BAD

DECISIONS

COMMU NICATION

RHETORIC

slide17

BUT

RICH WHITE MAN SAW

THAT IT WAS GOOD

slide18

GOOD

FOR THE

RICH WHITE MAN

slide19

COMMUNICATION

BREAKDOWN

slide22

IN

WHAT WAYS

DO WE COMMUNICATE?

slide23

TEXTUALY

ORALLY

VISUALLY

ETHICALLY

slide24
“I’d like to introduce you to…”

…an ongoing conversation which lies in between tech writing, visual rhetoric, graphic design, and first-year composition.

look who s talking
Look Who’s Talking

Stephen Bernhardt, Sam Dragga, Christina Haas, Gail Haiwisher, Mary Hocks, Jim Porter, Cynthia Selfe, Craig Stroupe, Patricia Sullivan, Ann Wysoki, Kathleen Yancy, and (of course) Gunther Kress.

And, lately, Lee Sherlock, Dundee Lackey,

Doug Walls, and Jim Ridolfo are entering the conversation.

slide26
Ten years ago, the conversation seemed more of controversy as educators wrestled with conflicting ideas and a lack of empirical research from tech-based writing classrooms.

Today, while certain educators remain skeptical, many like-minded teachers teach that visual rhetoric is rhetoric and therefore must be stitched into the very fabric that holds first year writing together.

slide27

Composition,

Tech Writing,Visual Rhetoric,

Rhetoric, Technology, Writing,

Theory, Genre,

Multimedia,Pedagogy

“Words don’t simply talk to words, but to images, links,

horizontal lines [and they] replicate … verbal literacy.”

Craig Stroupe

slide28

Williams argues that verbal and visual media need to be integrated into

composition classrooms.

We as teachers should be helping students acquire skills in visual literacy.

Composition,Tech Writing,

Visual Rhetoric, Rhetoric,

Technology, Writing

Technologies, Theory, Genre,

Multimedia,

Pedagogy, design

Sean Williams

slide29

“Design projects …

bring the concept of multi-literacy squarely into the middle of the composition process [and] help students design an activist

academic project that represents new knowledge for a real audience.”

Composition, Tech Writing,

Visual Rhetoric,

Rhetoric, Technology,

Writing Technologies, Theory,

Multimedia, Research,

Pedagogy, design

Mary Hocks

slide30

“Hypertext provides a

significant resource for

teachers who wish to

integrate theory,

pedagogy, and technology.”

“By its intersection with the very nature of reading and writing … hypertext offers help to students in bringing together the acts of reading and writing, both cognitively and contextually.”

Composition, Tech Writing,

Visual Rhetoric,

Rhetoric, Technology, Writing

Technologies, Theory, Genre,

Multimedia, Research,

Pedagogy,design

Self & Haiwisher

slide31

The "unified objective …

is to see and comprehend the

communicative process as a dynamic whole, to create an awareness of the interacting forces that condition it at each turn."

Composition, Tech Writing,

Visual Rhetoric, Rhetoric,

Technology, Writing,

Theory, Genre, Multimedia,

Research, Pedagogy, design,

Communication

George & Trimbur

(emphasis mine)

slide32

Wysocki questions “what is gained and what is lost through

any communication practice (see Selfe and Selfe), especially

as computer technologies heighten our awareness of

the visuality of texts.”

Composition, Tech Writing,

Visual Rhetoric,Rhetoric,

Technology, Writing

Technologies, Theory, Genre,

Multi-media,

Pedagogy, design

Ann Wysocki

slide33

“All design has social, moral, and political dimensions … that are conceptually, visually,

and functionally appropriate for particular clients and audiences in particular environments”.

Composition,Tech Writing,

Visual Rhetoric,Rhetoric,

Technology, Writing

Technologies, Theory, Genre,

Multimedia,

Pedagogy,design

Ehses, Hanno, Ellen Lupton.

slide34

MICHIGAN STATE

UNIVERSITY

DRPW

2007

slide35

Lee Sherlock

Science & Technology

Class is centered on digital games and digital and visual rhetoric open up possibilities for writing and discussion centered on those games. The visual, according to Sherlock, gives students a place to begin discussion about how games shape culture; how they construct cultural and social values.

Students design a game which involves many rhetorical choices “many of which are visual (e.g., character design, environment, Interfaces, etc.)”

Their research culminates in multimedia presentations and

workshops given to the rest of the class which too contains many visual rhetorical elements.

slide36

Lee Sherlock

Science & Technology

Sherlock mentions his intent to bring in aural rhetoric, but

hasn’t been able to himself attain the necessary vocabulary to

host that discussion in the classroom just yet.

Ethically speaking, Sherlock discusses ethics of gameplay

in games such as Grand Theft Auto and mentions the duality

of this discussion. “This can be treated both at the level of

player ethics (are players being forced into it or do they become

complacent in an unethical situation) as it intersects with

cultural representation (whether or not this game is an ethical

portrayal of urban culture).”

slide37

Dundee Lackey

Science & Technology

Dundee Lackey assigns a hypertext argument in her 1st year

composition classes. This argument was the brainchild of Sean

Williams where students write from several different perspectives

and hyperlinks in their arguments take the readers instantly to those

alternative views.

Lackey also draws on the works of Ann Wysocki, Danielle DeVoss,

Gunther Kress, Paulo Frerie and belle hooks in her pedagogy.

She asks her students to

“Read the World.”

slide38

Dundee Lackey

Science & Technology

Students in Dundee Lackey’s classes are often asked to contribute

to the class wiki, which “gets them thinking about texts more

spatially and more visually.”

Lackey takes issue with these divisions within the field

and feels that dividing literacy and rhetoric hinder her pedagogy.

When asked about teaching visual rhetoric she replied, “isn’t the

alphabet visual?” She went on to discuss that rhetoric is part

of communication, and that writing is just communication.

slide39

Douglas Walls

Evolution of American Thought

Doug Walls on different “rhetorics:” “I am not sure the division

of rhetoric into channeled mediums is productive.”

Students in his writing class do produce “visual rhetoric”

insomuch, as Walls puts it, “all texts include visual aspects.”

Ethics in Walls’ course are “discussed in terms of Rhetorical Forum.

That is, the premise of the class is not that certain constructed

arguments are better than others, but that forums change and allow

for certain arguments, appeals, and evidence…”

slide40

Jim Ridolfo

American Radical Thought

Ridolfo advocates the use of “Affective Pedagogy” as coined by

Julie Lindquist where “the classroom itself is a rhetorical situation.”

He looks at each classroom, and at each set of students as a new

rhetorical situation. Ridolfo feels that publicly rhetoricians accept this situation as a given, but sometimes deny it in their classrooms.

The student is the audience.

slide41

Jim Ridolfo

American Radical Thought

Ridolfo’s students incorporate the abilities to answer complex research questions—historical mysteries discussed rhetorically—and has them include visuals in their “standard academic texts.” Visuals include headers, charts, pictures—where the student often takes those pictures themselves as they do archival photography using digital cameras.

Complex digital research skills are integrated into traditional archival get-your-hands-dirty research and in doing so, students in Jim Ridolfo’s American Radical Thought become experts on an historical moment that probably they know better than anyone else.

slide43

Students must have a full report of communication skills; this means they need to be able to recognize rhetorical situations, to analyze them, to write to them, to use visuals to support their writing, and they need to be able to articulate themselves orally and ethically about their decisions as well as about their chosen subject matters.

This is no small task, but it is one that is accomplishable—if we begin in 1st-year composition classes.

slide44

It’s not only visual rhetoric, but textual, oral, and ethical “rhetoric(s)” which students need to grasp from their 1st-year writing courses in order to be the best communicators they can be throughout their futures—inside these walls of academia—and beyond.

slide45

At Michigan State University, we teach to the whole person and we teach the whole art of communicating. The trends are to bring literacies, critical thinking, writing, composition, listening, seeing, art, design, reading and writing all back under the umbrella of rhetoric…

slide46

Afterall,

aren’t we all

just communicating?