there is always hope julie rems smario m a m s l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
There is Always Hope Julie Rems-Smario, M.A.,M.S. PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
There is Always Hope Julie Rems-Smario, M.A.,M.S.

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 130

There is Always Hope Julie Rems-Smario, M.A.,M.S. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 196 Views
  • Uploaded on

There is Always Hope Julie Rems-Smario, M.A.,M.S. What Is ?. is a nonprofit organization, established for and by Deaf women in January 2003 Our mission at

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'There is Always Hope Julie Rems-Smario, M.A.,M.S.' - ivan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
what is
What Is ?
  • is a nonprofit organization, established for and by Deaf women in January 2003
  • Our mission at

is to end domestic violence and sexual assault against Deaf women and children through empowerment, education and services

violence against women exists in all cultures
Violence Against Women Exists in All Cultures

Violence against women is different in each culture based on the language and values of their people

slide23
Women are 5 to 8 times

more likely than men to experience domestic violence

U.S. Department of Justice (1998)

slide24
Deaf Women in domestic and sexual violence situations are at greater risk for fatality because of lack of resources, access, and audism
deaf victims of domestic violence
Deaf VICTIMS of Domestic Violence
  • Amber Burroughs –Illionois
  • Darlene Vandergliesen-South Dakota
  • Kisha Sullivan-New York
  • Christine Bronk-Wisconsin
  • Tallie Marie Antolin-South Carolina
  • Heather Villalba-Maryland
  • Priscilla Vinci-California
  • Penny Williams-Utah
domestic violence
Domestic Violence?
  • Pattern of Power and Control behavior
  • Happens in all cultures
  • Power and control is based on language and values of people in each culture
domestic violence in deaf community
Domestic Violence In Deaf Community
  • Deaf community also has aspects of domestic violence often overlooked by law enforcement, medical professionals, etc.
  • Deaf women have less options then hearing women for domestic violence services
  • Deaf community is unique because of its language and cultural norms that cross geographical borders
  • Domestic violence in Deaf community often overlooked by hearing professionals such as the law enforcement
asl vocabulary for dv sv
ASL VOCABULARY FOR DV/SV
  • Victim
  • Survivor
  • Abuse
  • Domestic Violence
  • Sexual Violence
  • Child Abuse
  • Abuser/Batterer/ Perpetrator
  • Empowerment
  • Healing Process
  • Audism
  • Deafhood
eight aspects of power control
Eight Aspects of Power & Control
  • Intimidation
  • Emotional Abuse
  • Isolation
  • Minimize, Deny, Blame
  • Using Children
  • Hearing Privilege/Male Privilege
  • Economic Abuse
  • Coercion/Threats
examples of domestic violence in the deaf community
Examples of Domestic Violence in the Deaf Community
  • Overuses floor stomping/pounding on table or door
  • Signs very close to your face when angry
  • Criticizes your ASL skills or communication style
  • Makes you afraid with gestures, facial expressions, or exaggerated signs, then denies it by saying that is Deaf Culture to justify the behavior
examples of hearing privilege abuse
Examples of Hearing Privilege Abuse
  • If you call the police, he interprets to manipulate the situation to his benefit
  • He doesn’t allow your children to use ASL or talk with you
  • He doesn’t allow your children to be proud of Deaf Culture
  • He puts down your ASL
  • He criticizes your speech and English skills
  • He excludes you from important conversations
slide33
LOSTDeaf survivor loses trust in self after trauma from domestic and/or sexual violence and loses trust in the system because of Audism

“I am so exhausted from trying to teach the hearing system about my access rights that I cannot focus on taking care of myself. I feel like giving up” --Deaf survivor

slide34

OUR SYSTEM -- MORE STRIKES AGAINST DEAF SURVIVORSRevictimized by the system--Law enforcement, courts, shelters, department of children and family services, counseling, etc., due to audism

slide35

DEAF CULTUREDeaf culture is learned and passed down from generation to generation. Most cultures are passed down within families and at Deaf schools 90 percent of Deaf people are born to hearing parents, so only a small percentage of Deaf people learn their culture from their family. Most Deaf people learn their culture and language through interactions with their peers at school and in the Deaf community

slide36
AUDISM(from Latin audire, to hear, and -ism, a system of practice, behavior, belief, or attitude)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audism

a term used to describe discrimination or stereotypes against deaf people:

Judgement that a deaf person is incapable simply because he or she cannot hear

Assumption that the cultural ways of hearing people are preferable or superior to those of deaf or signing culture

Belief that deaf people are somehow less capable than hearing people--Audists can either be hearing or deaf

audism is also another word for hearing superiority
Audism is also another word for “hearing” superiority

an attitude of thinking one person is superior to another person because he or she can hear better than him or her.

Audism also happens during interactions between some deaf:

Deaf people who do not value sign language and will not identify with the Deaf community may considerthemselves to be "better" than others who use sign language and are part of Deaf culture.

This is often learned behavior taught by public schools, oral programs, and hearing parents.

slide38
AUDISM IN OUR SYSTEMThe hearing way of dominating, restructuring, and exercising authority over the deaf community

Historically practiced by administrators of education institutes for deaf children, training programs for deaf adults, interpreters, and some audiologists, speech therapists, otologists, psychologists, psychiatrists, librarians, researchers, social workers, and hearing aid specialists.

(Lane 1992: 43)

least restrictive environment not
Least Restrictive EnvironmentNOT!
  • PL 94-142 enforced children with disabilities to attend public school as least restrictive environment—It is actually the most restrictive environment for Deaf children
  • Many Deaf children experienced isolation in public children without critical mass of Deaf peers often found at Deaf schools
  • During past 30 years Deaf children have been growing up up without strong foundation in either English or ASL
  • Without Deaf adults as role models, they generally lacked self esteem as Deaf individuals
  • Many Deaf children graduated not knowing how to advocate for themselves
audism impacts deaf survivors
Audism Impacts Deaf Survivors
  • Deaf survivors do not trust seeking help from the system because of years of experience with Audism and oppression
  • It is often easier to stay with their abusive Deaf batterer than to deal with the system
deafhood vs deafness
DEAFHOODvs Deafness

Deafhood conveys an affirmation and positive acceptance of being deaf.

Deafness-- a medical term which measures people deaf people in terms of their hearing loss as an undesirable medical condition.

  • Deaf persons have been treated as deficit human beings WITHOUT hearing and trained by the surrounding dominant hearing culture to regard themselves that way, which includes emphasized notion around the inability to hear and to speak.
  • Deafhood--Deaf people evaluate and liberate themselves from these internalized inferiority complex resulting from Audism and entertaining the notion of deficit.

Deafhood is a process of self-liberation

by Dr. Paddy Ladd in his book "Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood".

mythbusters about lipreading
MYTHBUSTERS ABOUT LIPREADING!

Only about 30% of the spoken words can be lip read, and the rest is educated guesswork

Educated guess work includes use of clozure skills

Clozure skills requires extensive thinking-- Survivors are too traumatized, tired and/or stressed out

exercise 1
EXERCISE #1

YOU ME CROSS

MISS ME KNOW

SORRY

exercise 1 answer
EXERCISE #1 Answer

WE MUST HAVE

JUST MISSED

EACH OTHER. I AM SORRY.

exercise 2
EXERCISE #2

WOMAN SILLY MOUTH WIDE MY FACE ME UNDERSTAND NO

exercise 2 answer
EXERCISE #2 Answer

WOMAN WAS SCREAMING IN MY FACE I DIDN’T UNDERSTAND HER

exercise 3
EXERCISE #3

DADDY MANY MANY HIT BLOOD ME SAW ME RAN TELL FRIEND ME AFRAID CALL POLICE MAYBE JAIL

exercise 3 answer
EXERCISE #3 Answer

DADDY HIT (WHO?) SO MANY TIMES TIL I SAW THE BLOOD. I WAS SO SCARED AND RAN AND TOLD A FRIEND ABOUT IT. MY FRIEND CALLED THE POLICE AND MAYBE DADDY WILL GO TO JAIL.

Courtesy of www.DVAS.org

deafhope is deaf survivor centered
DeafHope is Deaf Survivor Centered
  • Deaf women advocates who are survivors of domestic violence have used their own experience to let other Deaf women know that they are not alone.
  • This power of peer advocacy within our culture & language context changes the dynamics of social change from "us vs them" to "we"
slide54

DeafHope’s Empowerment PhilosophyOnly the survivor can make her own choices to start her journey towards rediscovering her own power This only can happen when she finds a place in her own language, ASL, and Deaf culture context.

When I first arrived at DeafHope I just sighed with relief because I can just focus 100% on healing without communication barriers. No more misunderstandings and stress”

--Deaf Survivor

slide56
FINDING HOPEDeafHope promotes environment free of audism, communication barriers, and fear so healing can take place
slide57

DeafHope Advocates and Deaf SurvivorsWe listen with our EYES without judgingWe ask in ASL what she wantsWe explain with our HANDS her it is not her fault.We give her VISUAL safety planWe work with her to CHANGE the systemThere is no US and THEM—Always WE

deaf run dv sv agencies mushrooming throughout our nation
Deaf-run DV/SV Agencies Mushrooming Throughout Our Nation
  • 1980s- Abused Deaf Women Advocacy Services (ADWAS) in Seattle, Washington
  • 1998-2000-National training to 15 states by ADWAS
  • 2003-DeafHope implemented in California
  • 2006- ADWAS opened first shelter/transitional homes
  • 2007-Twenty Deaf-run agencies and programs
  • 2008- 4th National Justice for Deaf Victims will be hosted in Vermont
  • 2010- There will be approximately 40 Deaf DV/SV agencies
growing awareness in the deaf community
Growing Awareness in the Deaf Community
  • Access to training videos, websites, vlogs, blogs
  • Deaf advocates visibility
  • Focus groups and community events
slide61

HOW TO HELP CREATE MORE COMFORTABLE ENVIRONMENT FOR SHELTERS?Deaf woman in a hearing group living situation where everyone speaks different language is very isolating and lonely

  • Video Phone and TTYs
  • Blank paper and pens
  • Allow survivor to keep her pager
  • Do not require her to participate in support groups (they benefit more with Deaf support group if its available)
  • Make security system accessible
  • Unrestricted access to television with closed captioning
  • Allow Deaf survivor to visit friends and family during the day to get the support she needs and break the her isolation

ADWAS has materials for shelter residents “Domestic Violence Handbook for Deaf People” (www.adwas.org)

for more information about working with deaf survivors
For More Information about working with Deaf Survivors

www.AccessingSafety.com

www.Deaf-Hope.org

we must always hope for world free of violence in honor of our deaf victims
We must always hope for world free of violence in honor of our Deaf Victims

Darlene VanderGiesen

1963-2006