COMMUNITY OF CARING Building Character. Any School. Every Child. All Day Long. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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COMMUNITY OF CARING Building Character. Any School. Every Child. All Day Long.

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  1. COMMUNITY OF CARINGBuilding Character. Any School. Every Child. All Day Long. COMMUNITY OF CARING Building Character. Any School. Every Child. All Day Long.

  2. Uniqueness of Community of Caring • K-12, comprehensive, whole-school, research-based, character education framework • Social inclusion of all students in a caring school community, especially students with disabilities • Groundbreaking, pioneering work in the teaching of values • Integration of the five core values of caring, respect, responsibility, trust and family into every aspect of school life

  3. History of Community of Caring • Founded by Eunice Kennedy Shriver and the Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation in 1982 • Originally founded to reduce the incidence of intellectual disabilities by reducing one of its causes- teen pregnancy • Currently adopted by over 950 schools in the United States and Canada

  4. Why Eunice Kennedy Shriver Began Community of Caring “My original concept for Community of Caring was to create school environments in which children with mental retardation would be appreciated for their gifts, and all children would gain the skills to become strong, independent, joyful teenagers, whose decisions would be hopeful, caring, responsible, and endowed with a sense of justice and a sense of freedom. Young people would be able to make decisions that would enlarge their capacities to contribute to the goodness of their families, schools, communities and nation.”

  5. Why Do Schools Adopt Community of Caring? • Fosters character and citizenship development • Improves school attendance and academic performance • Improves school climate and creates a caring community • Fosters greater acceptance of diversity, including students with developmental disabilities • Creates safer school environments; bullying prevention • Prevents teen pregnancy • Reduces tobacco, drug and alcohol use

  6. Six Principles for Integrating Character Education • Principle l: Character education is part of every subject, not just another subject. • Principle 2: The school and community are vital partners in the character education of youth.   • Principle 3: A positive classroom environment supports character education. • Principle 4: Empowered teachers are in the best position to carry out the goals of character education.  • Principle 5: Character education is encouraged through administrative policy and practice. • Principle 6: Character education is action education. From “Integrated Character Education,” a Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation publication (Fastback 351), by Kenneth Burrett and Timothy Rusnak, derived from the 1980 Council for Research in Values and Philosophy project and literature review.

  7. Community of CaringCore Values CARING RESPECT RESPONSIBILITY TRUST FAMILY

  8. Community of CaringComponents Values In and Across the Curriculum Student Leadership/ Forums Service Learning/ Community Service Family and Community Involvement Staff Development and Ongoing Support

  9. Values In and Across the Curriculum • Process for integrating values of Caring, Respect, Responsibility, Trust and Family into existing curricula • Development of school and community-wide programs to foster values • Posters and banners to provide a common vocabulary for character education

  10. Student Leadership/ Forums • Opportunities for students to problem-solve through the lens of the five core values • Multiple options for student voice to be heard in middle and high schools • Class meetings, buddies and cross-age groups in elementary schools

  11. Service Learning/ Community Service • Provides opportunities for students to grow intellectually, ethically, socially and emotionally • Identifies primary community needs • Allows schools to function in the scope of a wider community

  12. Family and Community Involvement • Families and schools work together to foster the five core values • Community members are encouraged to be involved in school activities • Community of Caring brings together all segments of the school community

  13. Staff Development and Ongoing Support • Start-up staff development (2-day or 1-day programs) • Follow-up staff development • Newsletter and other materials • Annual summer conference • On-line training • Technical assistance

  14. Foundation of the Process LEAD TEACHER COORDINATING COMMITTEE ACTION PLAN COC COMPONENTS COC CORE VALUES

  15. Character Education WheelCommunity of Caring Social Inclusion Family/Community Involvement Your School Values In & Across the Curriculum Staff Development/Ongoing Support Student Leadership/Forums Service Learning/ Community Service

  16. Community of Caring Research • Early Research (1991):The Center for Health Policy Studies, Columbia, Maryland. In Community of Caring schools versus non-Community of Caring schools: • Students earned higher grade point averages • Students reduced involvement in at-risk behaviors, such as teen pregnancy and use of alcohol • Recent Research (2003):Dr. Ann Higgins d’Alessandro, Fordham University. Community of Caring schools have more caring school cultures than non-Community of Caring schools in the following ways: • Students involved in more positive student to teacher relationships • Student involved in more positive student to student relationships • Students feel they have a say in what happens in the school, and are able to speak up • Students feel they have good educational opportunities

  17. Implementation Survey (2003):Dr. Michael Hardman, University of Utah. Community of Caring schools report major benefits as: Community of Caring Research (Continued) • More open and positive environment • Greater understanding and acceptance of all students • More family involvement • Greater student leadership • More effective collaboration among teachers and students

  18. “The quality of caring we give determines whether we are successful as individuals, as families, as communities, and as nations. Political power, monetary wealth, and physical strength are as nothing compared to the creation of a good society.” Eunice Kennedy Shriver

  19. For further information, please contact Community of Caring(202) 393-1251 For further information, please contact Community of Caring(202) 393-1251 Kristin Fink, Executive Director Ron Axelrod, Membership Services Coordinator contact@communityofcaring.org www.communityofcaring.org Kristin Fink, Executive Director Ron Axelrod, Membership Services Coordinator contact@communityofcaring.org www.communityofcaring.org