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MARKETING PRESENTATION. GROUP 4. QUESTIONS. Case Study Question 2 Review Question 3. Case Study. Using the internal and external characteristics that influence consumer behaviour, explain why you think organic food is popular among most Australian consumers?. Internal influences.

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Presentation Transcript
questions
QUESTIONS
  • Case Study Question 2
  • Review Question 3
case study
Case Study
  • Using the internal and external characteristics that influence consumer behaviour,
  • explain why you think organic food is popular among most Australian consumers?
psychological influences
Psychological Influences
  • Motivation
  • Perception
  • Learning
  • Beliefs and attitudes
motivation
Motivation
  • Maslow's hierarchy of needs
  • For Australians social status and esteem are an integral part of buying process.
  • The Australian Organic Consumer Survey (AOCS) established that ¾ of consumers consider it more ethically and sociable to buy organic –2005
perception
Perception
  • Process by which people select, organise and interpret information to form a meaningful, whole picture of the world.
  • Selective distortion – support what we already believe
  • For example, 93% purchase organic food because of perceptive health benefits.
learning
Learning
  • Describes changes in an individual’s behaviour arising from experience
  • 74% supported the notion that organic food tastes better
beliefs and attitudes
Beliefs and Attitudes
  • Popular belief that organic foods is too expensive
  • Australian Consumers Association,(ACA) recently confirmed that belief organics are 70% more expensive than regular inorganic foods.
  • Organic is now mainstream
personal
Personal
  • Age and life cycle stage
  • Education
  • Socio – Economic status
  • Personality and self concept
  • Consumer lifestyle
age and life cycle stage
Age and life cycle stage
  • People change the goods they buy over a life time (grand-parents, parents, children)
  • Includes family life cycle – large families may choose cheaper inorganic fruit and veg. concern for freedom from pesticides/ herbicide residues (93%)
education
Education
  • ACNielson in 2005 found that half of Australian consumers purchase organic goods.
  • With high level of education the only common characteristic.
economic status
Economic status
  • Affected by income – Inability of consumer to purchase organic goods
  • ACA claims that Australians are being ripped off.
  • AOCS – 70% more expensive
  • Australia is still a wealthy nation
personality and self concept
Personality and self concept
  • Ridge (2007) describes a new type of eater
  • Ethicurean– likes food but gives priority to sustainability, organic, local and ethical.
consumer lifestyle
Consumer lifestyle
  • Consumers preference for consuming organic food is a lifestyle choice.
  • Australia is very sporty nation, with the more physically active choosing healthier organic products
cultural influences
Cultural Influences
  • Culture
  • Cultural diversity
  • Social Class
culture
Culture
  • Cultural shifts
  • Entirely organic market – inorganic early 19thcentury
  • Organic movement of the1990’s
  • Now an established market in Australia
cultural diversity
Cultural diversity
  • Food preference
  • Large families may not purchase more expensive organic foods,
  • compared to a young working couple
social class
Social class
  • Lord Taverne – in his book The March of Unreason
  • States that organic food is a monument to irrationality and an indulgence of the rich.
social
Social
  • Household type
  • Reference groups
  • Roles and status
household type
Household type
  • Trends toward smaller families in Australia
  • Increased dispensable income
  • Therefore increased purchases of organic goods
reference groups
Reference groups
  • Family father or mother, as an opinion leader, may wish to purchase organic goods.
  • Increasing concern into how food is produced
roles and status
Roles and status
  • Roles in Families – Australian mothers typically purchase goods
  • Children may influence
review question 3
REVIEW QUESTION 3

MARKETING INFLUENCES

question
QUESTION
  • Influences – are some more important than others?
  • Figure 2.5 depicts the many different influences on consumer purchasing behaviour.
  • Might marketing management focus on the wrong influence?
slide28
CONT.
  • For example, the early marketers of instant cake mixes couldn’t see that the users had been left with nothing to do, and may have felt guilty about using such a convenient product rather than devoting the time and energy to family care that society of the day saw as necessary.
  • Psychological influences were far stronger than the influence of marketers until they enabled the consumer to ‘add an egg’.
personal1
Personal
  • Age and Life cycle – (children as users)
  • Occupation – (work boots, clothes)
  • Education – Social status (wealthier value highly)
  • Economic situation – Affected by income (Ferrari)
  • Self concept – Ethicurean (organic)
  • Lifestyle – Activities, opinions (sportsman, health food)
psychological
Psychological
  • Motivation – Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
  • Perception – General picture, Apple.
  • Learning – Consumers may switch to similar brands (generalisation) Nike – Adidas
cultural
Cultural
  • Culture – Culture to purchase apple products
  • Social Class – social status, being seen using a product in a certain environment. i.e. Ipod
social1
Social
  • House hold type - Family of procreation – children/ spouse influence buyer (Nag Factor)
  • Reference groups – Opinion leaders, Family heads
environmental
Environmental
  • Economic – GFC – massive impact
  • Technological – advances, ‘the next’
  • Political – Carbon tax, implications upon electricity usage
conclusion
CONCLUSION
  • No one influence is more important than each other,
  • However considering each in light of certain individual circumstances some may be become more important.