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Science Content and Pacing Embedding the Florida Standards: Scaffolding for Science Success. Millard E. Lightburn , Ph.D., District Supervisor K-5 Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist Jessica Hernandez, Facilitator Caroline Valdez, Facilitator

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science content and pacing embedding the florida standards scaffolding for science success
Science Content and Pacing

Embedding the Florida Standards: Scaffolding for Science Success

Millard E. Lightburn, Ph.D., District Supervisor K-5

Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist

Jessica Hernandez, Facilitator

Caroline Valdez, Facilitator

Division of Academics-Department of Science

August 12, 2014

name tent
Name Tent
  • Fold a blank sheet of paper to set up a name tent
  • Front: Your Name
  • Back: School

Grade

Self-contained or Departmentalized

norms
Norms
  • Be present/Participate actively
  • Share wisdom
  • Try out something new and then reflect
  • Trust the process
agenda
Agenda
  • Goals and Outcomes
  • Discovery Education Session A: 8:45- 10:15

Session B: 10:15 - 11:30

Session C: 12:30 - 2:00

  • Florida Standards Connections in Science
  • Scaffolding Science K-5 Physical Science Big Ideas
  • Big Idea 8 Hands-On Activities
  • Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER)
  • Observation, Measurement and Investigation Hands-on Stations
  • District Resources
  • Dream in GreenSession A: 2:30

Session B: 2:40

Session C: 2:50

  • Factors Influencing Science Instruction
  • Essentials for a Successful Science Class
goal and outcome
Goal and Outcome

Goal

  • To develop learners that use a variety of instructional strategies to consistently infuse Florida Standards during effective science instruction using the Science Pacing Guides

Outcome Statement

  • Participants will develop skills and practice using tools to facilitate structures that will be utilized during planning and instruction to effectively infuse Florida Standards into their science curriculum
discovery education presentation http www dadeschools net employee portal
Discovery Education Presentationhttp://www.dadeschools.net/Employee portal

Become a

DEN star

….

Get the

Science

Techbook

Resource

Available for all schools

Department of Mathematics and Science

florida standards that impact science instruction
Florida Standards that Impact Science Instruction

LAFS

LAFS.5.RI.3.7

Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.

LAFS.5.W.3.9.

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

LAFS.5.SL.1.1.

Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others.

MAFS

MAFS.K12.MP.1.1

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

MAFS.K12.MP.2.1

Reason abstractly and quantitatively

MAFS.K12.MP.3.1

Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

MAFS.K12.MP.5.1

Use appropriate tools strategically.

MAFS.5.MD.2.2.

Represent and interpret data.

Division of Academics – Department of Science

impact of florida standards on science instruction
Impact of Florida Standards on Science Instruction

How do you integrate the Florida Standards

into your science instruction?

scaffolding science standards k 5
Scaffolding Science Standards K-5

How are science topics and standards interconnected across grade levels?

(1) Big Idea 8: Matter

(2) Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter

(3) Big Idea 10: Forms of Energy

(4) Big Idea 12: Motion

(5) Big Idea 13: Force and Motion

Division of Academics-Department of Science

benchmark focus
Benchmark Focus

Science Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter

Florida Standards Integration

  • LAFS.5RI.3.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.
  • LAFS.5.W.3.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • LAFS.5.SL.1.1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.
  • MAFS.K.MD.2.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.
  • MAFS.3.MD.1.2 Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects using standard units of grams (g), kilograms (kg), and liters.
  • MAFS.4.MD.2 Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec.
what is matter
What is Matter?
  • Matteris everything around you,

including you!

  • Look around the classroom. Everything, from the clothes you are wearing to the air you breath is matter.
  • Matter is what all objects are made of.
  • Matter is All Around Us (song)
  • Name a type of matter you see.
  • How do we tell the difference between the matter around us?
all matter has properties
All Matter has Properties.

What are properties?

Propertiesare the characteristics of matter that can be observed.

What does it mean to observe?

To observe an objectmeans to carefully explore all of its properties.

slide14

Look for words that describe properties of matter as you read.

Make a list in your notebook.

What other properties

can you name? Add them.

how do we study properties of matter
We use our Senses(K-5)

Sight - Looks

Color

Shape

Size

Touch – Feels (texture)

Hear – Sounds when dropped

Smell – Odor

Taste

Eyes

Hands and Fingers

Ears

Nose

Mouth

How do we study properties of matter?

to observe properties of matter

we use our senses to tell about an object s properties
We use our sensesto tell about an object’s properties.

Looks

Shape - round

like a sphere

Feels

Texture –

fuzzy

color –

yellow green

Sounds

bouncy -thump, thump

Smells

Odor -

musty

Properties of a Tennis Ball

what else can we use to help observe properties
What else can we use to help observe properties?

Measurement Tools (2-5) Properties

  • Ruler length
  • Tape measure length
  • Measuring cup volume
  • Graduated cylinder volume
  • Balance mass
  • Thermometer temperature
what are m y properties
What are my Properties?

Choose an object from your table tray to observe using your senses and measurement tools. Write its name and properties in your notebook.

Looks Length

Feels Mass

Sounds when Other(s)

dropped

Odor

how can w e sort
How Can We Sort?

We can use our senses to classify matter in different ways.

We can group matter by how it feels.

Some matter may feel hard or bumpy.

We can group matter by shape. Matter can have

many different shapes. (Gr. 1 Scott Foresman Quick Study)

How can we sort these buttons?

We can sort by color:

blue - red – green– yellow

Matter can be different colors.

We can sort bysize:

small - medium – large

Matter can be different sizes.

small

practicing science sort group classify
Practicing ScienceSort, Group, Classify
  • Observe the school supplies in your basket.
  • Make a data chart to list the properties observed and measured in your notebook.
  • Decide on a way to sort your objects.
  • Sort the objects. Name your groups.
  • Talk about why you classified them as you did.
  • Can you sort your objects in another way?

Try it.

matter jeopardy game rules
Matter Jeopardy Game Rules

Game Rules

  • Select an object you observed.
  • List both qualitative and quantitative properties (begin with the most obvious properties).
  • Give descriptions to other group as they try to guess the object based on its properties.

What is my matter?

Qualitative Properties: (uses five senses)

  • Texture: smooth and hard
  • Shape: long cylinder
  • Other: Not magnetic

Quantitative properties: (Uses measurement tools)

  • Mass: 10 g
  • Length: 14 cm
  • What is a marker?

Division of Academics – Department of Science

practicing science teacher reflection

Practicing Science:Teacher Reflection

How didyou see the Florida Standards being

integrated in the hands-on activities?

Division of Academics - Department of Science

slide25
Overall Driving Question:How can we support our students in crafting evidence based arguments in science and across the curriculum?

SHAMWOW Video

Integration of Florida Standards through a Claims, Evidence and Reasoning (CER)

What does Vince want you to do?

Why is Vince so convincing?

Write down all the evidence that Vince uses to convince you to buy Sham Wow.

slide26

Claim: You should buy a Sham Wow because it absorbs

water better than any other towel.

Evidence:

Does not drip.

Holds 20 times it’s weight in liquid.

Absorbs all liquid from a carpet.

What more could Vince do to convince you that you should buy Sham Wow? (Hint: think like a science teacher)

Let’s make Vince’s presentation even better and add the reasoning to his evidence.

Reasoning: The Sham Wow towel works so well because it contains micro fibers. Micro fiber towels are made from two synthetic (man made) materials, usually nylon and polyester. The fibers are treated with chemicals and mechanically changed to make them very small, smaller than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair. This gives the towel a lot of surface area to make contact with the spill and absorb the liquid. The tiny fibers get into small places where most towel fibers cannot reach.

Source:

http://www.cleanlink.com/cp/article/Microfiber-101-The-Science-of-Tiny-Threads--3488

claim
Claim

Claims are the statements that answer your original question.

  • The claim must be accurate, specific, and answer the question.
  • The claim is usually one sentence in length.
evidence
Evidence

The evidence is all the scientific data that supports your claim.

  • This data helps to answer the question or problem that the students are examining.
  • It can come from a variety of sources such as:

lab investigation, textbook, reading selections,

videos, news reports, class notes, etc.

  • It should include both qualitative and quantitative data.
  • It is important to have numerous pieces of evidence in order to prove your claim.
reasoning
Reasoning
  • Reasoning is the explanation that connects your claim to the evidence that supports it or why you think your claim (answer to the question) is correct.
  • It is the justification that shows why the data is relevant and should be used to support the claim as evidence.
  • It shows a detailed understanding of the scientific principles involved and uses correct science vocabulary.
  • This explanation acts as a conclusion.
  • If evidence is from an experiment, it can be the “conclusion” of the lab.
  • It is usually several sentences in length.
claim evidence ce
Claim Evidence (CE)

Assignment: Think like a scientist to write an answer to this question:

How do you learn about the properties of objects?

Claim:(A sentence that states how you learn about properties of objects.)

Evidence: (Examples (data) of what you did to learn about properties of objects.)

getting started
Getting Started

First think about:

  • What is a possible claim?
  • Where can you find your evidence (data)?
  • Where can you find science and other words to help you write?
  • What science words will you want to include?

Use your resources:

  • Science notebook
  • Observations from hands-on activities and videos
  • Reading passages
  • Your textbook
  • Classroom charts, word walls and bulletin boards

Division of Academics - Department of Science

writing scaffolds
Writing Scaffolds

Sentence Starters:

  • My evidence to support my claim is…
  • The data…
  • According to the text…
  • On page ___, it said …
  • For instance…
  • From the reading, I know that…
  • The graphic showed…
  • For example…
  • My evidence supports my claim because..

Writing Words:

  • “Uncertainty” words:

usually, generally,

suggests, indicates

  • Sequencing words:

first, second, third,

  • next, last
  • Therefore
  • Because
  • If… Then…
  • However

Division of Academics - Department of Science

slide34

You can look for help in your textbook. Let’s read.

Science words

Claim: I use my senses to…

Evidence

I can see …

I can

feel…

ce samples
CE Samples

Claim:I use my senses to observe properties of objects.

Evidence:

Properties of my eraser

Looks

Color – pink

Shape – rectangle like

Feels – smooth - bends

Drop and hear – thump,

thump

Smells - rubbery

Claim:I can use my senses to observe properties of objects.

Evidence: My eraser’s properties - First I used my eyes to look. My eraser’s color is pink. Its shape is like a box. Next I used my hands to feel it. It is smooth. It can bend. I smell it with my nose. It smells like rubber. Then I used my ears to describe the sound it made when I dropped it. It bounced a little and sounded like a thump, thump.

gr 2 cer sample
Gr. 2 CER Sample

Claim: I know I can use my senses to learn about properties of objects.

Evidence:

Pencil’s properties:

Color: blue and yellow

Shape: long and round like a can with one end sharpened and the other end with an eraser.

Feels: smooth and hard

One end feels sharp and the other end feels rubbery.

Sounds when dropped: plop, plop

Smell: woody

Reasoning: Here is how I used my senses to observe my pencil’s properties. First I used my eyes to look at my pencil. I can see my pencil’s color is blue with yellow stars. Its shape is long and round like a can. I can see one end is sharpened with a point. Next I used my hands to feel it. It feels smooth and hard. Then I used my ears to describe the sound it made when I dropped it. It sounded like a plop, plop. Last I used my nose to smell it. It smells like wood. My pencil like all objects have properties that I can observe with my

senses.

3 5 claim evidence reasoning cer
3-5 Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER)

Assignment: What properties can be used to classify

your school supplies?

Claim: My school supplies can be classified by their mass, length, shape, texture, and attraction to magnets.

Evidence: (Record all the evidence you gathered from hands-on investigations).

Data:School Supplies Observations Table

slide38
3-5 Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER)SC.3.P.8.1, SC.4.P.8.2, SC.5.P.8.2: Observe and measure objects by their properties.

Reasoning: (Write a statement that explains why you think your claim or answer to the question is right.)

My school supplies can be classified by their mass, length, shape, texture, and attraction to magnets. As a result of measuring my supplies I learned some are greater in mass than others. For example, two of the five objects had a mass of less than 10 grams compared to the other three objects that were up to 26 grams. Next using my senses of sight and touch, I discovered that I could not sort my objects by texture. They were all smooth and hard. However, the objects could be classified by shape such as regular versus irregular. Some had parts that were magnetic. My evidence supports my claim because objects and materials can be compared to one another based on their observable properties.

matter cer questions
Matter CER Questions
  • How do you learn about matter?
  • How do scientists study the properties of matter?
  • How do scientists describe the basic properties of matter?
  • What are the basic properties that scientists use to describe matter?
  • How can we tell the differences between types of matter?
  • How do people use the properties of matter?
  • What are some ways that a substance’s properties depend on its state?
  • How do we know matter is all around us?
  • What characteristics of solids, liquids and gases are alike and different?
matter online resources
Matter Online Resources

Videos and Interactive

Discovery Education:

  • Measuring Matter
  • Fundamental: What’s the Matter
  • Identifying Properties of Matter
  • Matter Is Everywhere
  • Matter
  • How Matter Looks and Feels
  • Properties of Matter
  • Matter is All Around Us (song)

Inquiry in Action:

  • http://www.inquiryinaction.org/classroomactivities/

Study Jams:

  • Matter

Sites for Reading Passages:

  • http://www.readworks.org/books/passages
  • http://k12reader.com

Scott Foresman Science through

Teacher Portal or

https://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/snpapp/login/login.jsp

Printable Resources:

  • Quick Study
  • FCAT Benchmark Mini-Lessons

Discovery Education: Search

matter -reading passage

Division of Academics – Department of Science

effective science strategy
Effective Science Strategy

When can the Claims Evidence and Reasoning (CER) strategy be used during your science lesson?

when can a cer be used
When can a CER be used?
  • Use it to engage in structured, argumentation to explain a scientific concept.
  • Use it after an experiment to explain why a hypothesis was proven correct or not.
  • Use it to justify an answer choice for a multiple (FCAT type) test question is correct.
  • Use it to discuss claims made in videos, commercials, documentaries or news reports.
claim evidence reasoning after viewing a video news report or a documentary
Claim, Evidence, Reasoning after Viewing a Video, News Report or a Documentary
  • What key points did you learn from this video?
  • What is the scientific explanation?
  • What vocabulary words are connected to the lesson?
  • What is the claim the reporter is making?
  • What evidence does he or she cite in the report that supports that claim?
ela ccss literacy supports content area state assessment
ELA CCSS Literacy Supports Content Area State Assessment

reasoning

Sample FCAT 2.0 Science Question

A radiometer is a device with fins that spin when light energy strikes them.

A picture of a radiometer is shown below. As part of an experiment, a light

source was placed 50 centimeters (cm) from a radiometer. The light

source gave off four different-colored lights for 30 seconds (s) each. After

each color of light was turned off, the amount of time the fins on the

radiometer spun was recorded. The results are shown in the table below.

Which color of light provided the greatest amount of light energy according to the data in the table?

F. red

G. green

H. blue

I. white

evidence

claim

grades 2 5 practicing science like a s cientist
Grades 2 - 5Practicing Science Like a Scientist

Observation, Measurement and Investigation Stations

  • Observe a Rock
  • Classify Rocks
  • Measure a Rock’s Length
  • Weigh a Rock

5. Measure a Rock’s Volume (Gr. 4 & 5)

6. Bubbles and Fizz (Gr. 4 & 5)

learning goals grade 5
Learning Goals Grade 5

Division of Academics-Department of Science

bring your own device byod
Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)

Power My Learning Grade 5 – Play Lists

http://powermylearning.org

Dr. Lightburn’s Class: Teacher Code: 278894

  • Quarter 1:

Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter and Big Idea 9: Changes in Matter

      • http://powermylearning.org/user/playlist/gr-5---qtr-1---big-idea-8-properties-of-matter-275176

Interactive Sites for Education

http://interactivesites.weebly.com/science.html

factors influencing science instruction
Factors Influencing Science Instruction

Carousel Data Protocol

  • What are the challenges that impede you from effectively infusing the Florida Standards during the Science Instructional Block?
  • What should effective instruction look like in a science classroom?
  • What tools/resources are available to facilitate science instruction?
  • What instructional strategies should be used in a science classroom?
slide51

Essentials for a Successful Science Class

Pacing Guide &

Focus Calendar

Interactive Notebook (IAN)

Technology

Scott Foresman textbook, AIMS and other Supplemental Resources

Internet Access

Science Dept. Website

science.dadeschools.net

Florida Standards Integration

Discovery Education,

NBC Learn,

Gizmos, C-Palms

Common Grade Level Planning

Hands-on Materials

&

Measurement Tools

5 E’s

and/or Explicit Instruction

Promethean or SmartBoard

Designated School Science Leader

Office of Academics - Department of Science

so what now what
“So What? Now What?”

With what you’ve learned, what will your classroom and science teaching look like?

slide53

Slip

3-2-1 Reflection

Have a STEM-filled school year!