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Insert image here. Using waste minimisation to save money Overview. Insert image here. Vikki Lutman. Insert image here. Overview. 5 options for managing waste. Must no longer use farm dump or tip unless licensed. Can carry own waste but must be licensed to carry other peoples’.

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using waste minimisation to save money overview

Insert image here

Using waste minimisation to save moneyOverview

Insert image here

Vikki Lutman

Insert image here

overview
Overview
  • 5 options for managing waste.
  • Must no longer use farm dump or tip unless licensed.
  • Can carry own waste but must be licensed to carry other peoples’.
  • There are opportunities to: -
    • Minimise waste and make savings
    • Use waste minimisation to make money
waste minimisation
Waste Minimisation

Waste Minimisation – Saving Money

  • Farm Case Studies

Waste Minimisation – Business Opportunities

  • Diversification opportunities
arable farm
Arable Farm
  • 260 ha: growing crops from wheat, barley, oil seed rape, legumes.
  • Imports muck from nearby farm, using a contractor to spread.
main wastes produced
Pesticide containers

Pesticide washings

Fertiliser plastic

Plastic mulch

Seed bags

Crop residues

Office waste

Oil and filters

Batteries

Tyres

Hedge trimmings

Building waste

Scrap metal

Main Wastes Produced
arable farm review
Arable Farm Review
  • Review current practice
      • Pesticide policy; application rate & timing; calibration of your sprayer
      • Nutrient policy; application rate & timing; is land in NVZ, handle / store fertiliser
      • Plastic crop covers – type of sheets; plastic re usable; how is plastic disposed of
      • Crop produce & waste - new production & packaging techniques
principles of waste minimisation saving money by reducing waste
Principles of Waste Minimisation – Saving Money by Reducing Waste
  • Review Current Practice
  • Avoid Waste
  • Reduce Waste
  • Reuse Waste
  • Recycle Waste
  • Take Action
potential money savings
Potential Money Savings
  • Pesticides – rate and timing; use of other cultural or biological control methods; better target pesticides
  • Fertilisers– reduce waste during storage; nutrient management planning; improve calibration of spreader/sprayer.
  • Plastic crop covers - alternative systems; machine settings; reuse sheet
  • Crop and Produce waste – staff training; store management
lowland livestock farm
Lowland Livestock Farm
  • Mixed livestock: 600 ewes, 80 suckler cows
  • 200ha
  • In NVZ
  • Makes baled silage
main wastes produced18
Silage plastic

Silage wrap core

Bale twine & netting

Fertiliser plastic

Feed bags

Animal health product packaging

Veterinary waste

Office waste

Used sheep dip

Oil and filters

Batteries

Carcasses

Building waste

Farm Yard Manure (FYM) and slurry

Scrap metal

Main Wastes Produced
livestock review
Livestock Review
  • Silage Plastic – storage of waste plastic; density of bales; protection methods
  • Feed waste –storage of feed, where is the feeding done?
  • Use of Sheep dip – timing of dip, system and operation
  • Veterinary Products – sharps container; health policies
  • Carcasses – policy for casualty slaughter; incinerator
waste management options regulation continued22
Waste Management Options - Regulation Continued

** A Groundwater authorisation is required before pesticide washings can be spread to land

principles of waste minimisation saving money by reducing waste23
Principles of Waste Minimisation – Saving Money by Reducing Waste
  • Review Current Practice
  • Avoid Waste
  • Reduce Waste
  • Reuse Waste
  • Recycle Waste
  • Take Action
potential money savings24
Potential Money Savings
  • Silage Plastic – film rolls; maximise dry matter conserved per unit of film; deeper silage clamps
  • Feed Management – feed storage; modify manger/replace old feeders; spread waste feed.
  • Sheep Dip – reduce frequency; redesign dipping bath
  • Veterinary Products – improve aspects of livestock environmental control; isolation facilities; weigh animals before dosing
  • Carcasses – injury prevention, improve carcass removal; national fallen stock scheme.
office waste
Office Waste
  • Office waste is subject to the Regulations and therefore must be disposed of responsibly.
  • Hazardous wastes (e.g. cleaning materials, correction fluid, thinners, inks) require the use of the consignment note system.
  • Non-hazardous, controlled wastes (e.g. paper, plastic) require the use of the transfer note system.
  • Electrical equipment should be taken back to the supplier for disposal.
general farm waste review
General Farm Waste Review
  • Scrap Metals – replacement policy; service & maintenance
  • Fuel oil and lubricants – tank metres; thermostats;
  • Tyres – policy for waste tyres (recycle; send back with fitter; reuse)
  • Packaging (except pesticide and fertiliser) – storage; is disposal a problem.
potential money savings28
Potential Money Savings
  • Scrap Metals – authorised scrap merchant; sell for spare parts;
  • Fuel oil and lubricants – avoid crop drying; better insulation; re-circulate warm air
  • Tyres – avoid keeping used tyres; remoulding / re-treading of tyres
  • Packaging – bulk delivery; better purchase planning; recycling
optimising use of inputs
Optimising Use of Inputs
  • Electricity – Do you monitor energy use?
  • Clean Water – Irrigation; re-use water
  • Nutrients from manures and silage effluent – Manure Management Plan (NVZ); run-off of dirty water; Nutrient Management Planning.
waste minimisation31
Waste Minimisation

Waste Minimisation – Saving Money

  • Farm Case Studies

Waste Minimisation – Business Opportunities

  • Diversification opportunities
opportunities for diversification
Opportunities for Diversification
  • Carrying/transporting waste
  • Waste transfer stations
  • Composting
  • Incineration
waste carrier
Waste Carrier
  • Farmers will not need to register as a waste carrier to be able to carry their own waste to a licensed site for recovery or disposal.
  • If farmers want to carry other peoples’ waste to a licensed site, then they must register as a waste carrier with the Environment Agency.
  • There will be a 6 month transitional period for people wanting to register as a carrier.
types of waste carrier
Types of Waste Carrier
  • Professional Carrier - A waste carrier who carries only agricultural waste will have to be registered as a waste carrier with the Environment Agency, this is free of charge. For example, farm plastic recycling schemes.
  • Registered Carrier - A waste carrier who has registered to carry all controlled wastes and holds a waste carriers licence. This costs £136 for three years with renewal fee of £93.
waste carrier35
Waste Carrier
  • A registration form for a Registered Carrier can be downloaded from the internet:

www.environment-agency.gov.uk/commondata/

  • Or contact the Environment Agency through their enquiries line: 0845 603 3113
waste transfer stations
Waste Transfer Stations

“A waste management facility to which waste is delivered for separation or bulking up before being removed for recovery or landfill.”

Diversification example:

A farmer acts as a collection point for his neighbours’ waste silage plastic. The plastic is brought onto the farm by the producer and is sorted, baled and stored for a maximum of 12 months prior to collection by a recycler.

waste transfer stations37
Waste Transfer Stations

Waste Management Licensing

In order to operate a waste transfer station, the operator must either:

  • Apply for a Waste Management Licence from the Environment Agency, or
  • Register for an exemption from a Waste Management Licence from the Environment Agency

Various requirements for the handling of waste need to be met.

waste transfer stations38
Waste Transfer Stations

Waste Management Licensing Exemptions

  • It is likely that the diversification activities carried out on a farm will be exempt from the Waste Management Licensing Regulations requirements.
  • In the example given, providing that no more than 500 tonnes of plastic is stored at any one time and that it is sent for recovery/recycling, exemption 17 will apply.

Refer to the Waste Management Regulations 1994 (SI no. 1056) for a full list and explanation of exemptions.

Further information can be found at:

www.environment-agency.gov.uk/subjects/waste

waste transfer stations39
Waste Transfer Stations

Other Considerations:

  • Locality and access. Is there a sufficient source of waste in the area? Is the access to the site good enough for delivery of the waste and collection of bulked up waste?
  • Will the wastes to be dealt with vary in availability with the seasons, e.g. waste silage plastic production tends to peak at the end of winter.
  • Capital costs: Equipment such as a baler or compactor will require some investment.
composting
Composting
  • Opportunities exist for farmers wishing to diversify into composting.
    • Providing that no more than 1000 cubic metres of material is being treated or stored at any time, farmers can register for an exemption from the Waste Management Licensing Regulations 1994.
    • If more than 1000 cubic metres of material is being treated or stored at any time, a Waste Management Licence is required from the Environment Agency, and charges will apply.
composting41
Composting

The proposed exemption for sites includes:

  • Certain types of waste to be composted require different levels of design, e.g. green waste could be open air windrow turned without impermeable pavement or sealed drainage, however animal bedding waste would need to be composted on an impermeable and sealed drainage system.
  • Specific information on the composting process is required by the Environment Agency before awarding the exemption
composting42
Composting
  • Other considerations:
    • The more difficult the material, the higher the gate fee for composting the material.
    • A significant investment will be needed in order to set up a viable composting business (particularly if handling the more difficult wastes).
    • Consider the local area: sources of compostable material, sensitive receptors to the operation, planning requirements.
    • Destination of the compost: spread to land (sufficient land bank), sell material off site (high enough quality?).
    • Consider large scale operation - obtain a Waste Management Licence and compost in the region of 10,000 tonnes/annum to justify the capital costs.
incineration
Incineration
  • Farmers may install incineration facilities for their own and other farmer’s wastes
  • This may come under the PPC Regulations
  • Information and application forms are available from the Environment Agency
  • The costs for registration and licensing are likely to be substantial but will depend on the type and amount of waste being incinerated
defra publication
Defra Publication

The

Waste Minimisation Manual

PB4819

Defra Publications

08459 556000

www.defra.gov.uk/environment/waste/topics/agwaste/reduce-waste.pdf

recycling opportunities
Recycling Opportunities
  • Currently somewhat limited, but it is a rapidly evolving industry
  • A number of schemes able to take polyethylene and some take polypropylene
  • Scrap metal
  • Waste oil
  • Waste paper & cardboard
  • Pallets
  • Consider use of take back schemes
  • Waste Recycling Directory www.wasterecycling.org.uk(national)
  • Other websites i.e. www.egeneration.co.uk(local/regional) www.wastepoint.co.uk(national)
maximise recycling opportunities
Maximise Recycling Opportunities
  • Segregate waste by type e.g. plastics, metals, etc
  • Sub segregate each waste type e.g. plastics into polyethylene, polypropylene, etc
  • Store securely and protect from potential contaminants
  • Give consideration to the cleanliness of the ‘waste’
summary of the benefits of waste minimisation
Summary of the Benefits of Waste Minimisation
  • Reduction in wasted resource….....and costs
  • Reduction in landfill space…………and disposal costs
  • Reduction in pollution potential
  • Improved image/competitiveness
  • Legislative compliance

Waste minimisation works

“Saved costs of waste go straight to the bottom line”

finding a home for waste
Finding a home for waste
  • Find a recycler
    • Use the EA’s Waste Recycling Directory

www.wasterecycling.org.uk

    • Use other local and national websites

www.wastepoint.co.uk(national)

www.egeneration.co.uk(local/regional)

  • Take to the recycler/tip…

segregation, access issues….

  • Set up a recycling or collection business