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Communication Training for Children with Autism. Combining Applied Verbal Behavior and Social-Emotional Approaches. By Tracy Vail, MS,CCC/SLP Let’s Talk Speech and Language Services, Inc. Basic Goals of Teaching. Learning is Fun! Base new learning on old learning

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Communication training for children with autism

Communication Training for Children with Autism

Combining Applied Verbal Behavior and

Social-Emotional Approaches

By

Tracy Vail, MS,CCC/SLP

Let’s Talk Speech and Language Services, Inc


Basic goals of teaching
Basic Goals of Teaching

  • Learning is Fun!

  • Base new learning on old learning

  • Communication is valuable

  • Keep the child successful

  • People are fun to be with!


Learn the child
Learn the Child

  • How does the child respond to a variety of smells?

  • What does the child like to look at?

  • How does the child respond to a variety of touches/textures?

  • How does the child respond to a variety of sounds?

  • How does the child respond to a variety of tastes?


Be a provider of all good things
Be a Provider of “All Good Things”

  • Based on what you learn about the child, provide their favorite things with no demands.

  • Engage the child in play with favorite things. Never let the child play with the items alone.

  • Produce sounds/words consistently while engaging with the toys.

  • Once the child is engaged, he/she is ready to learn!





Teach the child to request
Teach The Child To Request

  • Gives the child the power of communication

  • Teach “I talk, I get”.

  • Replaces maladaptive behaviors

  • Serves as the basis for teaching all other functions of communicating.


Choosing a response form
Choosing a Response Form

  • Vocal- For children who can produce sounds and/or word approximations.

  • Sign Language- For children who can imitate motor movements but aren’t yet talking.

  • Picture Exchange/Object Exchange- For children who are unable to learn signs or used in conjunction with signs.

  • Voice Output Devices- For children with poor motor control and unable to use other methods.








To teach signs
To Teach Signs

  • Provide a great deal of touch during play so the child can tolerate hand over hand prompting.

  • Teach the child to imitate gross motor movements.

  • Say the word when you model the sign, as you prompt the child to produce the sign, and as you give them the item.








Teaching pecs
Teaching PECS

  • Requires two people for initial teaching.

  • Be sure to say nothing before picture is given.

  • Say the name of the item as the child hands you the picture and as you deliver the item.

  • Gradually add in distractor pictures and fade the prompts.




Teach the child to imitate
Teach the Child to Imitate

  • Imitation of motor movements leads to spontaneous imitation of others in the natural environment.

  • Imitation is very important to increase incidental learning.

  • Teach both motor and vocal imitation.



Use mastered requests to teach other functions of language
Use Mastered Requests to Teach other Functions of Language

  • Receptive Responses- Touch, find, get the, give me (child responds to directions)

  • Labels- fill-ins first then ask questions. The child does not get the item for labeling

  • Labels can be taught from requests because the child’s behavior is the same.

  • Most children who learn to request first, will label as they receptively identify objects.








Teach links between words
Teach “Links” between Words

  • Teach features of objects- Adjectives, parts

  • Teach functions of objects- what do we do with things?

  • Teach classes of objects- How can things be grouped?

  • Begin by having the child fill-in the word after you provide the FFC.

  • Then, fill in the FFC when you provide the word.




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