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Transforming Access: how the internet is opening up incredible resources for teaching history. Tom O’Leary Head of Education and Interpretation The National Archives. Cultural Content Providers Why are they valuable for Learning? The role of the internet

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Transforming Access:

how the internet is opening up incredible resources for teaching history.

Tom O’Leary

Head of Education and Interpretation

The National Archives

slide2

Cultural Content Providers

Why are they valuable for Learning?

The role of the internet

Content – ‘Scratching the surface’

slide3

My background

- Teaching

- The National Archives

- Current challenge….

slide4

Definition: What are Cultural Content Providers?

Asset Holders

The Nationals - BM, TNA, ONS, TATE, NPG, IWM, V&A, NMM, to name but a few!

The Locals/regional/other – MOL, BBC, BFI, – and many others!

slide5

Why are they valuable?

Diverse and stimulating collections of material

Unique material

Engagement

Expert curatorial staff

Investigative approach

The list is endless….

slide6

But….what can be the problem?

Many hundreds of thousands of pupils and teachers have and continue to enjoy access to these collections through traditional means. However, only a small proportion of potential users can in reality gain access.

For example The National Archives runs workshops for 8,000 pupils a year. Its learning website receives over 2 million visits in the same time.

So, can the Internet offer a solution?

slide7

Used intelligently it can be the perfect vehicle, it can unlock incredible resources for use by learners

empowers content holders to reach a much wider audience

on-line resources can reduce the amount of teacher preparation

provide a variety of information sources that would either be impossible or too expensive to obtain

offer a degree of student control and interactivity that is difficult to achieve otherwise

permanent and changing displays

curriculum relevant

Mostly free at the point of access

But…Some less than good out there as well!

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My Criteria

Free

Accessible

Making the Internet worth it!

Good Quality

Scholarship, Research

Focused on teacher’s and pupils needs

Structured Learning and Support

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The Learning Curve

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk

Produced by the - The National Archives

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The National Archives administers the public records system of the United Kingdom under the Public Records Acts of 1958 and 1967 for England, Wales and the United Kingdom. It acts as the guardian of the nation's collective memory as revealed in the records of government.

But……its in Kew – London!

Nearly 1000 years of records beginning with Domesday book on 100 miles of shelving

An incredible resource for the study of history

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So, what is the Learning Curve trying to do?

The aim of the Learning Curve is to be nothing less than an electronic field trip to whichever area of the past you are studying. It cannot take you back in time, but it can take you to an archive which will give you and your students a glimpse of what people thought, felt and said at the time of some of the most important events in world history.

The Learning Curve is also an electronic study room. Imagine your students thumbing through Domesday Book or looking at the minutes of government meetings during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Now imagine them doing this with the help of questions and structured activities, which make use of the expertise of archivists who know about documents and sources, and teachers who know about learning.

slide13

So, what is in the Learning Curve?

New navigation and home page

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk

slide14

The Snapshots

The Snapshots are short, easy to use investigations on a variety of History National Curriculum topics. Teacher's notes are included

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Focus Ons

The Focus on.. investigations examine themes in the History National Curriculum. They are designed to develop the skills that pupils need to examine a variety of historical sources. Focus Ons are interactive and include quizzes and activities

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Exhibitions

Based on topics in the History National Curriculum the Exhibitions provide in-depth information, organised into galleries. Each gallery is an investigation into a theme using primary material, linked to an overall question. Interactive tasks and teacher's notes are included.

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Curriculum Online

http://www.curriculumonline.gov.uk/

slide20

The British Museum

http://www.thebritishmuseum.ac.uk/compass/

http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/

http://www.ancientchina.co.uk/

slide21

The 24hr Museum

http://www.24hourmuseum.org.uk/

slide22

Show Me.Uk

http://www.show.me.uk/

slide23

Imperial War Museum

http://www.iwm.org.uk/lambeth/index.htm

slide24

BFI - Screen Online

http://screenonline.org/

slide25

Pathe

http://www.britishpathe.com/

slide26

Andrew Field

http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/

slide28

The Old Bailey

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/

slide29

Tom O’Leary

Head of Education and Interpretation

The National Archives

thomas.oleary@nationalarchives.gov.uk