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Risk Management Guide for Student Organizations. What Will I Learn from the Training? Understand the requirements of House Bill 2639 Ability to define risk management Use the risk matrix to identify and manage risk Identify risk in activities planned by organization

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slide2

What Will I Learn from the Training?

  • Understand the requirements of House Bill 2639
  • Ability to define risk management
  • Use the risk matrix to identify and manage risk
  • Identify risk in activities planned by organization
  • Develop methods to manage risk in activities planned by organization
house bill 2639
House Bill 2639

House Bill 2639 or Clay’s Bill was created after Clay Warren, a Texas Tech freshman died in an auto accident in 2002 returning from a fraternity retreat.

HB2639 requires fraternities, sororities, faculty advisors, and other student organizations to attend an annual risk management course each year.

slide5
Risk Management is the process of considering the potential and perceived risk involved in student activities.

It includes monitoring organization activities and taking both corrective action and proactive steps to minimize accidental injury and/or loss.

What is Risk Management?

high risk activities
High Risk Activities

Alcohol and Drugs

Hazing

Sexual Abuse and Harassment

Fire and Other Safety Issues

Travel

Behavior at Parties and Social Events

Others?

risk types
Risk Types

Physical: food poisoning/injury/accident

actions that result from physical injury, trauma or death

Reputation: organization is seen as racist or irresponsible

actions that result in negative publicity for your organization, TSU, your advisor and/or the venue where you are holding event.

Emotional: hazing activities or sexual assault

actions that can cause a participant at your event to feel alienated or negatively impact the feelings of a member or members of the TSU community

Financial: unable to pay bills/members owing dues

actions that negatively impact the fiscal stability of your organization and/or other organizations financially supporting your event

Facilities: property damage/weather/capacity/lack of equipment

situations that limit your event or prevent it from being held

risk management concepts
Risk Management Concepts

Identify risky behavior and activities

Assess the probability of adverse outcomes

Identify and implement ways to manage risk (eliminate or reduce)

Reevaluate activities after the risks have been managed

Georgia Institute of Technology, 2002

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RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE MATRIX

Please feel free to speak to or consult with staff in Student Activities to assist in this risk assessment and insurance management process.

Step One – List all event activities or concerns and identify risks associated with each activity.

Step Two– Use the Matrix to determine the level of risk before applying any Risk Management strategies

Step Three – Brainstorm methods to manage risks. See if you can reduce the probability that something will go wrong.

Step Four – Submit Risk Management Matrix with Activity Permits/Proposal to Student Activities.

NAME OF EVENT:

* Possible risks include: medical emergencies, food poisoning/allergic reactions, damage to University reputation, damage to University property and/or facilities, accidents, injury, and/or death.

**Methods to manage risks may include: purchasing special event liability insurance, arranging for security through TSU PD, traveling with an advisor, rotating drivers, etc.

SERIOUSNESS

I – May result in death.

II – May cause severe injury, major property damage, significant financial loss, and/or result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

III – May cause minor injury, illness, property damage, financial loss, and/or could result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

IV – Hazard presents a minimal threat to safety, health, and well-being of participants.

PROBABILITY

A – Likely to occur immediately or in a short period of time, expected to occur frequently.

B – Probably will come in time

C – May occur in time.

D – Unlikely to occur.

If any special activity score is within the red or yellow the Office of Student Activities must review. The Risk Management & Insurance Matrix must be filed when an Activity Proposal is require.

The form has been provided as an educational tool to help student leaders to develop a process for identifying and discussing potential risk issues. It is intended for use as part of a larger event planning process, and should only serve as a starting point for your discussion on risk management. It is not designed to take the place of a careful review of applicable rules, policies, and laws, or discussion with your advisor. Completion of this form does not imply approval or authorization of your event by Tarleton State University. For more information on event planning, contact Student Activities in the Thompson Student Center.

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EXAMPLE EVENT

Tarleton Camp

Camp for freshman students attending Tarleton State University. Camp is held at off-campus location. Accommodations include bunk-style housing and camp style cafeteria.

Events include travel to and from camp location, Waddle Olympics, brigade races, small group meetings, guest lecturers, services presentations and a dance.

Camp is optional. Students who choose to attend pre-register and pay for the Camp experience.

risks associated with camp
Risks associated with Camp

Physical

Travel to and from camp site; sprain/break at Waddle Olympics; heat related health issues; insect bites; drowning during brigade; slips, trips, falls, weather

Reputation

Injury to camper;

Emotional

Homesickness; roommate issues;

Financial

Damage to camp facilities; camper taken to ER; insufficient participation

Facilities

Liability issues; damage; layout; proper accommodations

Camp Risks

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NAME OF EVENT: Camp

* Possible risks include: medical emergencies, food poisoning/allergic reactions, damage to University reputation, damage to University property and/or facilities, accidents, injury, and/or death.

**Methods to manage risks may include: purchasing special event liability insurance, arranging for security through TSU PD, traveling with an advisor, rotating drivers, etc.

SERIOUSNESS OF RISK

I – May result in death.

II – May cause severe injury, major property damage, significant financial loss, and/or result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

III – May cause minor injury, illness, property damage, financial loss, and/or could result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

IV – Hazard presents a minimal threat to safety, health, and well-being of participants.

PROBABILITY

A – Likely to occur immediately or in a short period of time, expected to occur frequently.

B – Probably will come in time

C – May occur in time.

D – Unlikely to occur.

If any special activity score is within the red or yellow the Office of Student Activities must review. The Risk Management & Insurance Matrix must be filed when an Activity Proposal is require.

The form has been provided as an educational tool to help student leaders to develop a process for identifying and discussing potential risk issues. It is intended for use as part of a larger event planning process, and should only serve as a starting point for your discussion on risk management. It is not designed to take the place of a careful review of applicable rules, policies, and laws, or discussion with your advisor. Completion of this form does not imply approval or authorization of your event by Tarleton State University. For more information on event planning, contact Student Activities in the Thompson Student Center.

step two use the matrix to determine the level of seriousness probability of potential risks
Step Two: Use the matrix to determine the level of seriousness & probability of potential risks
slide16

NAME OF EVENT: Camp

SERIOUSNESS

I – May result in death.

II – May cause severe injury, major property damage, significant financial loss, and/or result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

III – May cause minor injury, illness, property damage, financial loss, and/or could result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

IV – Hazard presents a minimal threat to safety, health, and well-being of participants.

slide17

NAME OF EVENT: Camp

PROBABILITY

A – Likely to occur immediately or in a short period of time, expected to occur frequently.

B – Probably will come in time

C – May occur in time.

D – Unlikely to occur.

slide18

NAME OF EVENT: Duck Camp

High Overall Risk

Moderate Overall Risk

Low Overall Risk

brainstorm methods to manage risk at camp
Brainstorm Methods to Manage Risk at Camp

Find strategies you can apply to reduce the severity of the risk and probability that something will go wrong

Procure Summer Camp insurance for participants providing coverage that included accident, medical and general liability.

Check bus references before booking. (Purchasing Department)

Arrange for medical personnel to be onsite to treat minor issues such as insect bites, sun exposure, sprains, etc.

Monitor developing weather. Identify shelters locations & communicate with participants in case of inclement weather.

Request University counselor attend camp for emotional issues.

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NAME OF EVENT: Camp

* Possible risks include: medical emergencies, food poisoning/allergic reactions, damage to University reputation, damage to University property and/or facilities, accidents, injury, and/or death.

**Methods to manage risks may include: purchasing special event liability insurance, arranging for security through TSU PD, traveling with an advisor, rotating drivers, etc.

SERIOUSNESS

I – May result in death.

II – May cause severe injury, major property damage, significant financial loss, and/or result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

III – May cause minor injury, illness, property damage, financial loss, and/or could result in negative publicity for the organization and/or institution.

IV – Hazard presents a minimal threat to safety, health, and well-being of participants.

PROBABILITY

A – Likely to occur immediately or in a short period of time, expected to occur frequently.

B – Probably will come in time

C – May occur in time.

D – Unlikely to occur.

If any special activity score is within the red or yellow the Office of Student Activities must review. The Risk Management & Insurance Matrix must be filed when an Activity Proposal is require.

The form has been provided as an educational tool to help student leaders to develop a process for identifying and discussing potential risk issues. It is intended for use as part of a larger event planning process, and should only serve as a starting point for your discussion on risk management. It is not designed to take the place of a careful review of applicable rules, policies, and laws, or discussion with your advisor. Completion of this form does not imply approval or authorization of your event by Tarleton State University. For more information on event planning, contact Student Activities in the Thompson Student Center.

determine if you have reached an acceptable level of risk by applying management strategies
Determine if you have reached an acceptable level of riskby applying management strategies

Consider modifying or eliminating activities that have unreasonable risk associated with them.

Remember to consider how the activities relate to the mission and purpose or your organization.

The Risk Management Matrix is available on the Student Activities web site at http://www.tarleton.edu/~stuact/riskmgmt.html

Finally, what have you really changed to make sure risk has been reduced?

alcohol and drugs1
Alcohol and Drugs

Important Definitions

Public Intoxication- Occurs when a person appears in public while intoxicated to the degree that the person may endanger himself/herself or others due to the impairment of mental or physical faculties.

Minor in Possession - A person who is a minor (under 21 years of age) who is found to be in possession on an alcoholic beverage of any kind is in violation.

Minor in Consumption - Minor in consumption is just that! Just taking a sip of one beer violates the law. The only exception to this is if your parent or spouse is with you and giving you the alcohol to consume.

Purchase/Furnish - furnishing alcohol to a minor or providing a place for a minor to consume alcohol

alcohol and drugs2
Alcohol and Drugs

Important Definitions

Driving While Intoxicated - A person is Driving While Intoxicated when having a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 or more while operating a motor vehicle.

Driving Under the Influence - Complete intoxication is not required; the level of alcohol or drugs in the driver's body must simply be enough to prevent him/her from thinking clearly or driving safely. State laws specify the levels of blood alcohol content at which a person is presumed to be under the influence

Possession of Drugs – The offender knowingly and intentionally possess a scheduled drug without a valid prescription in a quantity usable for consumption or sale. The government must prove that the offender knew the drug was a controlled substance and that he or she had either actual possession of it or other control over it, either alone or with another person.

alcohol and drugs3
Alcohol and Drugs

Know the law

Check IDs at the door and use a unique way of identifying those over the legal drinking age, such as with bracelets.

Hire professional security to work the door and check IDs.

Serve non-alcoholic beverages and food.

Set a starting time and ending time for the party and stick with them, limit party to four hours.

Do not permit drinking games

Maintain control of all alcoholic beverages present.

Do not allow glass bottles.

Methods to Manage Risk

alcohol and drugs4
Alcohol and Drugs

Minor in possession

Stop the drinking

Take the appropriate action to deal with the minor in a safe manner

Illegal drugs

Notify authorities for removal of the individual

Ensure the person who is under the influence is properly cared for

Impaired Attendee

Do not allow the person to drive

Seek medical assistance as needed

Do not leave the person alone

What Should You Do?

hazing
Hazing

Hazing - any intentional or reckless act occurring on or off the campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of that student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are students at an educational institution.

  • Law - Tex ED. Code 37.151-156

Important Definition

hazing1
Hazing

Recognition of hazing

Follow the Student Handbook, Charter and/or National Policy

Stand-up for what is right – even if it is against “traditions”

Secret = Hazing

Types of hazing – subtle, harassment, and violent

Methods to Manage Risk

hazing2
Hazing

You see something that looks suspicious or you’re asked to participate in something that seems questionable

Ask questions about what is going on

Would mind you mind if I invite J-TAC to feature this activity/event in the newspaper?

Is there risk of injury or a question of safety?

Can you explain and /or justify the activity to my parents, to a professor, or to a university administrator?

Will the current members of the organization be participating in this activity? If not, why not?

Don’t be afraid to tell the group leader you are uncomfortable with the activities occurring

Report any behavior that is questionable but deemed ‘tradition’ for all new members to the

Office of Student Judicial Affairs

New members are instructed to participate in an activity, how do I know if it is consider hazing?

Any activities created with the intent to humiliate or degrade or demonstrate power over

you is considered hazing (activities below that have been deem as hazing in the courts)

Physical harassment: pushing, cursing, yelling, etc

Forcing or coercing someone to eat or drink against their will

Work parties / clean up for new members only

Conducting any type of "hell week" activities

Forcing or coercing someone to eat or drink against their will

Keeping the date of initiation into the group a secret

What Should You Do?

sexual abuse sexual harassment1
Sexual Abuse-Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Harassment is “unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature…[and]…can include unwelcome sexual advances, request for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Federal law prohibits sexual harassment of college students whether the harasser is an employee or another student.
  • Sexual Abuse – includes a wide range of unwanted sexual behaviors, including: sexual assault/murder, aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault, which can be forced contact or coercive in nature, indecent exposure, obscene phone calls, sexual harassment, voyeurism, frottage, peeping, etc. HB 2639 utilizes the term sexual abuse in an effort to encompass all of the above behaviors. However, for this risk management training sexual assault will be discussed more often.

Important Definitions

sexual abuse sexual harassment2
Sexual Abuse-Sexual Harassment
  • Educate Yourself
  • Look out for your friends
  • Stay in Groups
  • Never be alone with someone you don’t know
  • Never leave your beverage unattended
  • Decide what your limits are and communicate them clearly
  • Learn to be assertive
  • Do not assume anything
  • TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS

Methods to Manage Risk

sexual abuse sexual harassment3
Sexual Abuse-Sexual Harassment
  • Find a safe environment
  • Preserve evidence of the attack
  • Report the attack as soon as possible
  • Seek medical attention
  • Use available support resources

What Should You Do to Help Victims?

  • Let victims make decisions
  • Listen with patience
  • Active Listening
  • Provide victims with information and referrals

What Should You Do?

fire and life safety
Fire and Life Safety

Fire and Life Safety is the process of planning and implementing safeguards to ensure the well being of individuals attending your event.

Important Definition

slide39

Fire and Life Safety

Methods to Manage Risk

  • Ensure that all facilities utilized by your organization meet all fire and health codes and standards. Tarleton’s Office of Student Activities and Office of Risk Management and Safety can assist you with this effort.
  • Post emergency numbers and plans for fire, police, and other emergency services near all phones and exits.
  • Initiate appropriate actions in response to the emergency.
  • Have some method of accounting for attendees at location.
  • Never exceed the posted maximum occupancy of any facility used by the organization.
  • Ensure that all exits remain clear for easy access and escape.
  • Know your evacuation routes in apartments, houses, hotels, conference centers, etc.
  • Ensure that fire extinguishers are available and easily accessible.
  • Report to administration, landlord, etc. defective or inoperable fire protection equipment.
  • Do not tamper with fire protection equipment.
  • The possession and/or use of firearms, other weapons, and/or explosive devices is strictly prohibited on Tarleton’s campus.
  • Educate your members about these policies and confront members who violate it. Report any violations immediately to Student Activities, Judicial Affairs, and or the applicable law enforcement agency.
fire and life safety1

What Should You Do In Case of Fire?

  • Activate the fire alarm system to notify building occupants of the emergency.
  • Notify the University Police or the Fire Department of the fire.
  • Evacuate the building.
  • Remain outside until notified by the fire department the building is safe to re-enter. Do not allow anyone to re-enter a building until cleared by the proper authority.
  • There are several common causes of accidental college fires:
  • Careless smoking
  • Unattended candles, incense, perfume burners
  • Cooking
  • Overloaded extension cords and power outlets
  • Leaves and debris located near buildings
  • Unattended cooking grills
  • Improper use of surge protectors

Fire and Life Safety

fire and life safety2

Fire and Life Safety

What Should You Do in the Event Severe or Inclement Weather Occurs?

If City Tornado Siren sounds travel to the interior of the structure. An interior restroom provides better protection for most buildings.

http://www.tarleton.edu/~safety/guide/guide-inclementweather.html

Know the “Areas of Refuge” in each building on-campus. http://www.tarleton.edu/~safety/emergencyguide.html

Review Tarleton Inclement Weather Policy

http://www.tarleton.edu/~policy/SAP340702InclementWeather.html

Know about Tarleton’s Lightning Detection System

http://www.tarleton.edu/~policy/340701t101.htm

Code Purple

http://www.tarleton.edu/codepurple/

fire and life safety3
Fire and Life Safety

What Should You Do for other Campus Emergencies?

Review and know the following procedures if any of the following occur:

Terrorist/Shooter – follow directions of emergency personnel through Code Purple notifications.

Bomb Threat – review guidance contained in the University Emergency Guide.

http://www.tarleton.edu/~safety/emergencyguide.html

Injury Accident – know basic First Aid protocol

http://www.first-aid-product.com/pgFirstAidGuide.htm#FIRST%20AID%20GUIDE

travel
Travel

University-sanctioned travel occurs when travel meets all of the following conditions:

  • student travel is more than 25 miles from campus
  • to an activity or event that is organized, sponsored by Tarleton and is:
  • funded by Tarleton and using a vehicle owned or leased by Tarleton; or
  • sponsored by a student organization registered at Tarleton.  Social events, sponsored by student organization, are exempt; however, the sponsoring organization is encouraged to file travel forms as a precaution

Campus is defined as the university property or facility that is the location of departure (i.e.: Stephenville, Fort Worth, etc.)

A social event is defined as an activity exclusive of educational purpose and is not required by national, state, or regional affiliation.

Important Definitions

travel1
Travel
  • Consider alternative methods of transportation
  • Anticipate or prepare for emergency expenses associated with travel
  • Transportation in open beds of trucks should be avoided
  • Arrangements for transporting impaired individuals
  • When assigning someone to perform a task involving driving, consider their physical and mental state
  • Length of trip and number of available drivers
  • Your location provides easy ingress and egress
    • Emergency vehicle access
    • Stranding during bad weather

Methods to Manage Risk

travel2
Travel
  • If travel is delayed due to weather, breakdown or other causes – Notify the University and implement contingency plans (identified prior to trip)
  • For medical emergencies – Request medical assistance (normally that involves calling 911)
  • Driver becomes impaired – Delay the departure until driver is no longer impaired or assign the alternate driver. In an emergency, anyone who is a licensed driver may operate the vehicle to ensure the safety of the passengers.
  • Other situations – Seek assistance from the University and local officials as appropriate

What Should You Do?

behavior at parties
Behavior at Parties

Important Definition

An individual members actions can impact an organization’s reputation.

Appropriate behavior at parties should be an expectation of all organizational members.

behavior at parties1
Behavior at Parties

Methods to Manage Risk

  • Communicate organizational and University expectations to members BEFORE there’s a problems
  • Know the law
  • Use good judgment when…
    • Choosing to attend the party/event
    • Posing for pictures which could be posted to social networking sites
    • Staying at the party/event if you detect illegal/risky behavior
behavior at parties2
Behavior at Parties

What Should You Do?

  • A member hosts a party at his/her private residence and underage drinking is occurring.
    • Attempt to stop the consumption by the minor
    • Seek assistance to ensure the safety of the minor
    • If all else fails, report the activity to the local authorities
    • Remove yourself from the situation
  • A member is seriously impaired at a party.
    • Seek assistance to ensure the safety of the member
    • Do NOT leave the member unattended
slide51

Individuals with Disabilities

Under state and federal law and A&M System policy, no individual will be excluded from participation in, or be denied the benefit of, or be subjected to discrimination, based on disability under any system program or activity.

This includes extracurricular programs such as student organizations and club sports and activities. This may mean making reasonable modifications and providing aids and services that are necessary to ensure that qualified individuals with disabilities have an equal opportunity to participate, unless to do so would fundamentally alter the program.

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Individuals with Disabilities

A person with a disability is one who (1) has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; (2) has a record of such an impairment; or (3) is regarded as having such an impairment. A&M System programs and activities will not operate on the basis of generalizations, assumptions, prejudices, or stereotypes about disability generally, or specific disabilities in particular.

If you have any questions or concerns about making accommodations for individuals with disabilities, contact your Section 504/ADA Coordinator.

risk management training
Risk Management Training

Next Steps

Your responsibility now: The officers or advisors receiving the training must:

  • Report the program content at a meeting of the full membership of the recognized student organization
  • Submit to the Office of Student Activities a signed statement saying the report was made
  • Submit to the Office of Student Activities a copy of the meeting agenda or a flyer detailing the topics covered at the meeting
  • Adopt a risk management policy for the organization if a policy is not already in place