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Resource Conservation Challenge U.S. EPA’s National Priority Areas

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  1. Resource Conservation ChallengeU.S. EPA’s National Priority Areas Jon D. Johnston U.S. EPA Region 4 Chief, RCRA Programs Branch

  2. Today’s Purpose Overview of the RCC/FEC

  3. So Far, the Story has been • Focused on hazardous waste • Built the cradle-to-grave system • Permits for facilities largely issued • Corrective action focused on high priority sites • Next, moving to the 2020 Vision: The Unfinished Business of RCRA • Prevent pollution and promote recycling and reuse of materials • Reduce the use of priority chemicals at all life cycle stages • Cradle to Cradle

  4. The “Waste Wheel”

  5. RCC Goals Three goals: • Prevent pollution and promote recycling and reuse of materials • Reduce the use of priority chemicals at all life cycle stages • Increase energy and materials conservation

  6. The Four National Priority Areas • 35% Recycling of Municipal Solid Waste • Beneficial Use of Secondary Materials • Priority and Toxic Chemical Reduction • Green Initiatives - Electronics

  7. Other Priority Areas RCC considered other areas, but they will be handled through their existing national and regional workgroups: • Schools • Green Buildings • Hospitals • Tires

  8. National Priority Area:Priority Chemicals

  9. 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene * 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene ** 2,4,5-Trichlorophenol * 4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether ** Acenaphthene ** Acenaphthylene ** Anthracene * Benzo(g,h,i)perylene Dibenzofuran * Dioxins/Furans Endosulfan, alpha & Endosulfan, beta ** Fluorene ** Heptachlor * Heptachlor epoxide ** Hexachlorobenzene * Hexachlorobutadiene Hexachlorocyclohexane, gamma- (lindane)* Hexachloroethane * Methoxychlor * Naphthalene * PAH Group (as defined in TRI) Pendimethalin Pentachlorobenzene Pentachloronitrobenzene * Pentachlorophenol * Phenanthrene Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Pyrene ** Trifluralin * Cadmium * Lead * Mercury * The Listing of Chemicals Chemicals noted with “*” are considered the 1991 collection of priority chemicals used to define the 2005 GPRA Goal

  10. WMPCs 1991 v 2001 lb Basis 1991 WMPC 2001 WMPC* Pct Chg Alabama 690,208 769,577 11% Florida 213,092 333,331 56% Georgia 492,293 568,191 15% Kentucky 496,569 1,211,085 144% Mississippi 492,009 500,422 2% NorthCarolina 381,160 629,122 65% SouthCarolina 1,677,419 1,862,532 11% Tennessee 85,705 4,112,598 4,699% Region 4 4,528,455 9,986,858 121%

  11. 2001 TRI Data & 2008 Goal State WMPCs 10% Alabama 769,577 76,958 Florida 333,331 33,333 Georgia 568,192 56,819 Kentucky 1,211,085 121,109 Mississippi 500,422 50,042 North Carolina 629,123 62,912 South Carolina 5,062,532 186,253 Tennessee 4,112,598 411,260 Total 13,186,861 Corrected 9,986,861 998,686 Pound basis

  12. Priority Chemical Reduction Goals 1. Substituting for priority chemicals with safer alternatives whenever possible; 2. Minimizing the amount used whenever substitution is not possible; 3. Maximizing recycling whenever minimization or substitution is not possible; 4. Minimizing exposures to toxics, and the volume and toxicity of wastethrough product design.

  13. National Partnership for Environmental Priorities Program • Regional strategies to increase recruitment of NPEP Partners. • Build relationships with existing State Pollution Prevention programs, and develop joint NPEP and State program targeting and recruitment goals.

  14. National Priority Area: 35% MSW Diversion/Recycling

  15. 35% Diversion/Recycling of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)GOALS: • By 2008, increase diversion/recycling of the total annual MSW generated to 35% from 31% in 2002 (GPRA commitment) • Each year through 2008, maintain the national average MSW rate at not more than 4.5 lbs. per person per day (GPRA commitment)

  16. MSWFocus Areas • Paper • Organic Materials • Packaging & Containers

  17. Initial Focus On Selected Sectors/Areas • Schools • Office Buildings • Residential; Multi-Family Dwellings • Landscapers • Food Establishments • Examples: food courts, restaurants, grocers • Recycling-On-The-Go Venues • Examples: shopping centers, ball parks, special events, convenience stores, health clubs, recreation centers

  18. National Action Plan: Avenues, Initiatives & Programs For Success • America’s Marketplace Recycles • Implement recruitment strategy • Recycling-On-The-Go • Launch Program • Utilize other existing programs for outreach, support and potential pilot initiatives • EMS staff, Performance Track staff, enforcement staff • Issue papers and best management practices • Work with schools and hospitals sectors • Greening the Government – lead by example

  19. Focus Areas: • Coal Combustion Products • C2P2 Program • Foundry Sands • Construction and Demolition Debris

  20. National Priority Area: Beneficial Use

  21. National Priority Area:GreeningInitiatives-Electronics

  22. Scope of Action Plan • The RCC National Action Plan addresses environmental concerns along the entire life cycle of electronics, from design, operation, disposition, and disposal of equipment.

  23. Scope of Challenge • 50 million computers will become obsolete each year • 300 million will be obsolete in 2005 • 2 million tons of electronics will be disposed each year • Americans will have disposed of 154 million computers by 2005

  24. Goals and Objectives • Reduce or eliminate higher risk materials in electronics products at the source. • Foster environmentally conscious design manufacturing. • Increase purchasing and use of more environmentally sustainable electronics. • Increase safe, environmentally sound reuse, recycling or disposal of used electronics.

  25. Examples of Projects in Region 4 • Design for Environment • Electronics Toxicity Study • FEC: Govt/Feds • Partnerships with GSA, Region 4, Industry • Plug In-to Ecycling: Public Program • TechBirmingham Collection Event • Dell Collection Event • Kentucky Electronics Workshops

  26. Federal Electronics Challenge DOE P2 Workshop

  27. Topics • FEC Overview • Electronics Recycling using READ contract • Electronics, EMSs and the FEC • Becoming an FEC Partner • Q & A

  28. What is the Federal Electronics Challenge? • The FEC is a purchasing, use, and end-of life management challenge issued for Federal facilities or agencies to: • Purchase greener electronic products • Manage electronic assets in an environmentally sound manner • Receive assistance and network with other agencies to improve current practices

  29. Why are we focusing on electronics? There is no cohesive management system in place in the Federal government to improve the life cycle management practices of electronic equipment and enhance the growth of the infrastructure for the reuse and recycling of obsolete electronics

  30. FEC: Overall Goal • According the FEC Program the overall goal for Partners is: to reduce lifecycle environmental impacts of electronic products.

  31. Memorandum of Understanding • Signed by 12 agencies on 11/15/04 • Affirmed commitment to lead by example in electronics life cycle management • Process for Fed. Elec. Stewardship Summit, first was held in Feb. 2005

  32. Environmental Goals • Reduce the environmental impact of the use and maintenance of electronic equipment. • Reduce life-cycle impacts of electronic equipment through environmentally preferable purchasing. • Conserve and protect resources by increasing materials use efficiency, source reduction, and the recovery infrastructure of electronic equipment. • Reduce the volume and toxicity of electronic equipment waste through environmentally preferable end-of-life management.

  33. Overview of FEC Program • Voluntary program focused on education and recognition • Flexible (lots of choices within parameters) • Valuable network • Individual facility determines its: • Level of commitment • Goal(s) • Life cycle phase(s) on which to focus

  34. Opportunities As a Partner a Facility Can… • Show leadership • Reduce liability • Save money • Protect the environment • Integrate FEC with your existing EMS

  35. Focus on recognition Recognition for all participating facilities • Partner • Bronze • Silver • Gold

  36. Strategic Goals Integration of life cycle phases with higher partnership levels • Acquisition & Procurement, • Operations & Maintenance, • End of- Life

  37. Performance Measures for Partners FEC program will help Partners: • Establish baseline measurements • Develop goals • Use standard reporting mechanisms • Develop Partner Case Studies • Provide environmental benefit conversions

  38. Core focus of FEC = BMPs • How did the FEC Steering Committee develop best management practices? • Working directly with federal procurement officials, property managers, and information technology (IT) staff, • BMPs are outlined in Tools including: • fact sheets, case studies, checklists, sample contract/procurement language, presentations, Q & A’s • http://www.federalelectronicschallenge.net

  39. Sampling of Tools • Acquisition Planning & Procurement Checklist • List of Federal Legislation and Executive Orders relevant to the FEC • FAR Clauses Applicable to Environmental Purchasing • Product Information Sheet • Sample Product Information Sheet from IBM • Environmental Attributes • Using Environmental Attributes to Determine Best Value • Ecolabels • Contract Specifications • Total Cost of Ownership • Energy Conservation with ENERGY STAR® • Executive Order 13123 and You • Checklist for Selection of Electronics Reuse and Recycling Services • Electronics Recycling Facility Audit Checklist • Instructions to Recipients of Donated Electronics • Federal Property Reuse Programs

  40. Electronics Recycling using the READ contract

  41. Recycling Electronics and Asset Disposition (READ) Services Contract OMB designated the EPA as the executive agent for a Government Wide Acquisition Contract (GWAC) to provide the Federal sector with electronics recycling and asset disposition services.

  42. READ GWAC Goals • Provide a contract vehicle for the proper disposition of Federal electronic equipment in an environmentally responsible manner • Ensure security for sensitive electronic data • Create an audit trail of the equipment’s final destination • Maximize potential revenues from electronic equipment

  43. What services does the READ contract include? • Contractors will provide Federal agencies with: • Logistical/Inventory Support • Testing, Auditing and Tracking • Data Security • Valuation Process • Recycling • Management and Technical Support

  44. READ Details • 5-year Period of Performance (thru 12/09) • Fully-competed Multiple Award, Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contracts • Flexible Statement of Objectives (SOO) • Performance Based Task Orders • Complete Small Business Set Aside

  45. EPA READ Contractors: • Supplychain Services Inc.(SSI),Lombard,IL; • Molam International, Marietta, GA; • Asset Recovery Corp, St. Paul MN; • Liquidity Services Inc. (LSI), Washington, DC; • Hesstech, LLC, Edison, NJ; • HOBI International, Battavia, IL; • Global Investment Recovery (GIR), Tampa, FL; Please see www.epa.gov/oam/read for additional facility locations

  46. Electronics, EMSs and the FEC

  47. Why Put Electronics into Your Agencies’ EMSs • Creates way to get MOU/FEC goals met • Gives facility staff support and framework for the work they’ll be doing • Electronics may be responsible for significant environmental impacts for most federal facilities

  48. EMSs and the FEC: a natural fit • According to ISO Standard 14001 the goal of an EMS is: to achieve and demonstrate sound environmental performance by controlling the impact of their activities on the environment. • According the FEC Program the overall goal for Partners is: to reduce lifecycle environmental impacts of electronic products.

  49. Using the FEC approach to meet EMS Objectives The FEC provides tools and assistance to: • meet objectives through specific step by step activities • identify responsibility by building a team and provides access to other federal agencies experiences • develop goals and measure progress by outlining ways to measure, helping establish baselines and providing recognition for improvement